What Every Photographer Needs to Know About Facebook - Digital Photography School

What Every Photographer Needs to Know About Facebook

A Guest Post by Alison Zarrella – co-author of The Facebook Marketing Book.

2011 is shaping up to be a big year for photography on Facebook. Their New Profile highlights images above practically all else, and allows for some pretty creative customization with images. Facebook has also added the option to upload high resolution photos, and expanded the maximum number of photos in one album from 60 to 200.

Jayden-Tan-Facebook-Profile.jpg

Photography has historically been an area where Facebook excels, and for good reason. They are constantly making tweaks to photo album display settings, creating a simple interface for users to upload and friends to browse. In fact, they’ve been held up as an example as what more traditional photo sites should look to emulate.

Maximize Your Reach

As a person, you’re allowed a Facebook Profile. (Duh, right?) But you can also set up a Facebook Page for your professional photography services. The Page complies with all of Facebook’s stipulations for business and allows anyone to “like” you without the hassle of the friend approval process for a Profile. And a Profile allows you to suggest the Page to friends, manage Events and message people privately to discuss pricing or other private information.

Optimize For Search

Photography websites are almost always beautiful, shining examples of work. But photos and search engines don’t always play nice. A search engine needs plain text words to figure out what your website is about and display it in search results for relevant keywords. So if you have hundreds of images but no descriptions, it’s really hard for Google to tell potential clients that you have amazing portrait packages or special wedding deals.

Facebook albums allow you to easily add captions to every photo without any coding ability. Know your way around HTML? Try your hand at FBML and create custom tabs for each type of photography. You can add lots of gorgeous examples, as well as a few very important keywords.

PhotographyPage.png

Post Media-Rich Status Updates

It’s easy to post a text-based status update on Facebook, and that’s great for asking questions and adding more keywords. But to really stand out in the Newsfeed and show off your stuff, make use of media. Include a photo or link, or post new albums as status updates. And don’t freak out about going overboard. Data has shown that the most successful Pages post less than once a day. Aim to post three to five times a week, and make those posts count!

Create the Perfect Page Icon

Whether you stick with the old look or update to the New Profile, take advantage of customization options. Create a longer icon for both your Profile and your Page. The ideal size is 600 pixels by 200 pixels, where one third (200px by 200px) is your logo. This longer icon gives you space to show off your work while the 200 pixel square logo is perfect for cropping for the Profile or Page thumbnail that shows up next to status updates and in the Newsfeed.

Customize Your Page

Facebook provides lots of native, free applications to help brand your Page. Photos lets you add lots of images, and Notes allows you to write and format lengthier articles than a status update. (A good strategy every once in awhile for showing your photography knowledge as well as image examples.) As mentioned before, Static FBML will give you even more freedom to design your Page and showcase your work.

Get Creative With Content

It may be tempting to constantly post more photos to your Page, and you should, but don’t get stuck in a rut with links to large photo albums. Brainstorm other types of status updates that include relevant photography keywords to get you into Facebook search, and ask people to participate. Encourage engagement with open-ended questions and respond to people on your Page. Your goal should be to drive more engagement on your Page, in the form of comments and “likes” on posts. This will improve your Page score and help people find you more easily. Talk about photography, don’t just show it. Post links to articles you find interesting and really show that you know your stuff.

Alison Zarrella is a social media consultant who has worked with brands of all sizes, ranging from international companies to local businesses. A self-described Facebook fanatic, Alison has over 7 years of experience on the social network and recently co-authored The Facebook Marketing Book with her husband Dan. She can be found on Twitter @Alison, or on her blog AlisonZarrella.com, where she talks about social media marketing, online shopping, and of course, Facebook.

Read more from our Tips & Tutorials category.

Darren Rowse is the editor and founder of Digital Photography School and SnapnDeals. He lives in Melbourne Australia and is also the editor of the ProBlogger Blog Tips. Follow him on Instagram, on Twitter at @digitalPS or on Google+.

  • CS

    One HUGE thing you didn’t mention. Facebook has a right to use any photo on Facebook without your permission because YOU gave them permission to do this when you joined Facebook. If you are a professional photographer then you know that you do not want to give away your professional work for FREE to anyone. And, your kids, family and friends might just pop up in a advertisement, etc. without you giving permission AGAIN because you already gave them permission to use any and all of your uploaded photos. And I’d like to point out that most sites have this fine print.

  • Trep

    Some folks have convinced themselves that they can’t do effective marketing without a FB account. If you’re one of these people, proceed with extreme caution. FB has an established track record of not recognizing the property or privacy rights of any member, photographer or otherwise. I STILL receive contact requests from a FB account I deactivated and asked to have deleted. I was told it might take two weeks for the deletion to take place. That was 4 months ago.

    If the privacy of your personal data or the rights to your images are of any significance to you, I would recommend keeping them off FB. If you’re afraid that you can’t market yourself without without being a FB user, it’s quite possible to set up and use a FB account without providing a single piece of personal data and it’s also possible to post only images which are protected in a way which renders them useless commercially. But this requires that you set up your account in a way which is not at all obvious when walking through FB’s new member process.

    The one thing I absolutely would recommend against putting on FB are images of a personal or private nature, as there is no way to keep that content personal or private once it has been uploaded to FB. You might say “but that’s the whole point of FB, to share my personal life with my friends and family” … and I’d agree with you in so far as saying that this is what most people WANT to do with FB. The reality of FB, however, is that you’re sharing this information not only with your F&F, but with anyone and everyone in the world.

    FB is rapidly becoming a place only safe for very carefully marketing carefully protected images and only that data which you WANT broadcast to the entire world. As a place for sharing personal or commercially viable content, its about as safe as leaving your home unlocked while you spend a month abroad.

    As photographers, understanding and controlling the rights to our images is nothing new. This has always best been handled up front, in writing, so that all concerned know what rights they do and do not have to any images created, before the first shot’s been taken. ANY online service that does not grant you the photographer (or, similarly, model or snap-shot-taker) the right to completely control the destiny of your images is asking you to hand over your legal rights as though they were utterly unimportant.

    Would you drop off film to be processed by a lab that considered it their right to redistribute your images to whomever they liked? Would you keep your films or data in the safe deposit box of a bank that felt it their right to share your images with anyone who asked? Then don’t hand over your images to online services that don’t give you total control.

    Yes, folks, we’re going to have to actually start READING those long and boring “terms of service” texts before we click on “I accept”.

  • http://www.robclaytonphotography.co.uk Rob Clayton

    There’s a lot of talk here about Facebook acquiring the rights to any pics posted on its site by its users, and it seems this is putting people off using Facebook as a marketing tool. To me, this seems a bit like cutting your nose off to spite your face. Facebook can be a great (free) way to promote your business, and if your pics are watermarked with your logo/website address, then what difference if anyone else decides to use the image elsewhere?? The worst that they will be doing is promoting your business for you. Not such a terrible thing…..

  • carla

    I have heard Facebook “owns’ Your images once you publish them on your page. is this true?
    How secure are photos on their website if you publish them at a low resolution?

  • Josh

    I agree with the watermark comment made by Rob. I have never had any problems with facebook taking any of my photos and I have been using it as a marketing tool now for three years. Futhermore as time goes on it is proving to be more and more effective. Like Rob said your watermark will only spread your name more. And besides when all is said and done what are the odds your picture it going to show up anywhere, when anyone wishing to purchase a picture does not want it to be watermarked.

    Protect yourself by marketing yourself. A picture is worth a thousand words, but make sure one of those words is your name.

  • Fida

    Does anyone know how to add a “Reviews” tab on your Facebook fan page? It will be greatly appreciated. Thanks!

  • http://www.danfigphoto.com danfigphoto

    Remember, facebook is a public space (heck, the internet is a public space). Nothing private about it. Dont post it if you dont want the world to see it. Once it is uploaded, it is published. period.
    Be professional in everything you post.
    kudos,
    DanFig

  • John Richardson

    Sorry, but Facebook is just not “the place”, not only has it become over commercialized, but the copyright information and the privacy issues make it a bad risk. Stick with a dedicated photo blog.

  • http://www.facebook.com/karvounisphotography Nick Karvounis

    Great Article, I have decided not upload any images but to add them via networked blogs! It works just perfect!

  • http://www.davebrownphotography.com Denver Photography

    You have some really great suggestions here. I like all the stuff about your profile pictures.

  • Edson

    I opt not to post my photography on Facebook simply because their optimization settings really decrease the quality of anything you upload. It’s really not worth sharing on a platform (in my opinion) that does not present your work nicely. Hopefully Facebook improves on this.

  • cheryl

    what is TOS?

  • Marcie

    Cheryl: Terms of Service.

  • http://www.generalcleaningservice.net General

    The apps that allow short code right on a page have been a great tool to add a little more design to facebook

  • http://facebook.com/TerranoPhotography Christina

    I have to side with those on here that seem to be really paranoid. If you put your images on ANY internet based site it can be found, so don’t fool yourselves into thinking your images are safe. I recently googled myself and found out that literally ANYTHING I’d posted was there for the taking, and this was images posted on Flickr, myspace, facebook, digital photographer forums {even password protected ones you register for}, and online gallery space.

    The basis of the story? We’re in a digital world, and that means if you use digital files, then you can possibly lose them if you aren’t careful and are careless. WATERMARK YOUR WORK PEOPLE! Buy a blog template that can keep your images sharp and make them super low res, so that you give NO ONE A REASON TO BE SHADY.

    Sitting here bitching about it, instead of stepping up and making sure your work is safe, is just lazy. Sorry.

  • http://www.channelsteve.com Stephen McGrath

    Christina, you totally missed the point.
    There’s a big difference between stealing and being allowed to use images.
    People who use them from image searches, where the conditions of use are made clear at the source, are stealing. Facebook has the right to use your images because of their terms and conditions.
    It’s THAT which every budding photographer should be aware of. Those of us who know what we’re doing already steer clear of Facebook and other similar hosting options.

  • http://www.bycostello.com bycostello

    facebook is a great tool, but as the others say the t&c are a bit of a worry…

  • http://www.karenskellyphoto.com Photographer Aspen CO

    Unfortunately fb has taken away the ‘suggest to friends’ button. It’s very frustrating because now I have to request to be friends and then send them a message asking them to “like” my page. I don’t think most people read those notes on their friend request because hardly anyone ever goes to my page to like it.

  • http://blog.exposedplanet.com Harry, ExposedPlanet

    Great FB tips, but not for photographers…

    I see I am fortunately not the only one that is concerned, which is good. I have just explained all the terms of service and why it is bad for you to post pictures on Facebook. in detail.

    Just stay away if you are about your photos and even take care with share and like buttons for photography!.

  • http://www.sarinagito.com Sarina Gito || Photographer

    I totally agree with Philbert Photography (thanks for posting)
    I have gotten a lot of work thanks to FB. what i DO do concerning my photos is i watermark them all. and i don’t mind them using it cuz hey ..it’s all low res..they’ll never be able to print to make money off of my photos. and they are all tagged.

    I also post to my blog..where i don’t watermark all the images ..either way tho they are all low res.
    Thank you all for posting your two cents . It’s been very informative!!!
    and Philbert..u have some lovely work on your page =) u just got another fan.

    http://www.facebook.com/sarina.gito.photography

  • http://www.lensmankc.com Lensman kc

    Hey thanks for the tips,

    I created a fan page for my photography and that’s awesome…
    I woks for magazine and website company as a photographer and my
    FB page (Amity photography) helps me to promote my self…
    Happy :::::)
    My FB fan page…plz fell free to join and comment…i need it;

    (http://www.facebook.com/pages/Amity-photography/124474844283913)

  • Martin Agency

    I’ve decided to add a Portfolio tab to my page, take a look at it https://www.facebook.com/pages/Martins-Photography-Agency/115975515158077?sk=app_142362325841057

  • Boyet

    Facebook’s photography is mostly for amatuer snapshots and professional sellers. If you want serious critique and comment on your work, avoid FB. Avoid FB because of copyright.

  • http://www.imenk.net/ Enk

    I was going through different tutorials and tips on this site. Suddenly my eyes scrolled down to author bio and what I saw was Darren Rowse. This blog had to be amazing and really useful. I’m your old blogging-tips reader btw! Cheers for the amazing stuff Darren!

  • http://grotonvermontcameras.com mark sumner

    I was in vermont takeing photos for a snowboard contest at stratton mountian i broke the lens i needed the most some one told me bout this older guy that has 3 stores through out new england he is retireing a wealthy man and not going out makeing a profit all items bought are waranted and i think if your camera fell in the water he would replace his prices change depending moods and he always puts somethin in for free i got a telleconverter for free his site is funky but he responds write away on emails sometimes he lets you make the price the guy is everyones friend im glad i got to meet him i feel i should promote him for being so nice its http://www.grotonvermontcameras.com email is how he is doing his orders now no more running to the store he has every dslr brand but not all is up but he had a barn full of nikon fuji canon samsung everything for example a nikon d 300 body sells for 1765 body only his were 1222 yeah if u need somethin its a steal but it makes him happy to make you happy his email write down what you want a contact info he will quote you will like powercord22@yahoo.com

  • celi

    I have a photography fan page and i need help uploading albums! I know how to add wall photos, but albums?? I’m learning fb and need some help.

  • Jvodicka

    Great article, please check out my page at https://www.facebook.com/jvodickaphotography

  • GGP

    What’s wrong with my website. No return visitors. gavingillard.com

Some older comments

  • celi

    February 19, 2012 06:52 pm

    I have a photography fan page and i need help uploading albums! I know how to add wall photos, but albums?? I'm learning fb and need some help.

  • mark sumner

    February 2, 2012 07:04 am

    I was in vermont takeing photos for a snowboard contest at stratton mountian i broke the lens i needed the most some one told me bout this older guy that has 3 stores through out new england he is retireing a wealthy man and not going out makeing a profit all items bought are waranted and i think if your camera fell in the water he would replace his prices change depending moods and he always puts somethin in for free i got a telleconverter for free his site is funky but he responds write away on emails sometimes he lets you make the price the guy is everyones friend im glad i got to meet him i feel i should promote him for being so nice its www.grotonvermontcameras.com email is how he is doing his orders now no more running to the store he has every dslr brand but not all is up but he had a barn full of nikon fuji canon samsung everything for example a nikon d 300 body sells for 1765 body only his were 1222 yeah if u need somethin its a steal but it makes him happy to make you happy his email write down what you want a contact info he will quote you will like powercord22@yahoo.com

  • Enk

    January 8, 2012 12:05 pm

    I was going through different tutorials and tips on this site. Suddenly my eyes scrolled down to author bio and what I saw was Darren Rowse. This blog had to be amazing and really useful. I'm your old blogging-tips reader btw! Cheers for the amazing stuff Darren!

  • Boyet

    December 30, 2011 07:28 pm

    Facebook's photography is mostly for amatuer snapshots and professional sellers. If you want serious critique and comment on your work, avoid FB. Avoid FB because of copyright.

  • Martin Agency

    August 22, 2011 08:52 pm

    I've decided to add a Portfolio tab to my page, take a look at it https://www.facebook.com/pages/Martins-Photography-Agency/115975515158077?sk=app_142362325841057

  • Lensman kc

    July 22, 2011 09:05 pm

    Hey thanks for the tips,

    I created a fan page for my photography and that's awesome...
    I woks for magazine and website company as a photographer and my
    FB page (Amity photography) helps me to promote my self...
    Happy :::::)
    My FB fan page...plz fell free to join and comment...i need it;

    (http://www.facebook.com/pages/Amity-photography/124474844283913)

  • Sarina Gito || Photographer

    June 16, 2011 11:44 pm

    I totally agree with Philbert Photography (thanks for posting)
    I have gotten a lot of work thanks to FB. what i DO do concerning my photos is i watermark them all. and i don't mind them using it cuz hey ..it's all low res..they'll never be able to print to make money off of my photos. and they are all tagged.

    I also post to my blog..where i don't watermark all the images ..either way tho they are all low res.
    Thank you all for posting your two cents . It's been very informative!!!
    and Philbert..u have some lovely work on your page =) u just got another fan.

    http://www.facebook.com/sarina.gito.photography

  • Harry, ExposedPlanet

    June 9, 2011 07:59 am

    Great FB tips, but not for photographers...

    I see I am fortunately not the only one that is concerned, which is good. I have just explained all the terms of service and why it is bad for you to post pictures on Facebook. in detail.

    Just stay away if you are about your photos and even take care with share and like buttons for photography!.

  • Photographer Aspen CO

    June 3, 2011 01:39 pm

    Unfortunately fb has taken away the 'suggest to friends' button. It's very frustrating because now I have to request to be friends and then send them a message asking them to "like" my page. I don't think most people read those notes on their friend request because hardly anyone ever goes to my page to like it.

  • bycostello

    February 26, 2011 12:05 am

    facebook is a great tool, but as the others say the t&c are a bit of a worry...

  • Stephen McGrath

    February 19, 2011 12:46 pm

    Christina, you totally missed the point.
    There's a big difference between stealing and being allowed to use images.
    People who use them from image searches, where the conditions of use are made clear at the source, are stealing. Facebook has the right to use your images because of their terms and conditions.
    It's THAT which every budding photographer should be aware of. Those of us who know what we're doing already steer clear of Facebook and other similar hosting options.

  • Christina

    February 16, 2011 01:53 am

    I have to side with those on here that seem to be really paranoid. If you put your images on ANY internet based site it can be found, so don't fool yourselves into thinking your images are safe. I recently googled myself and found out that literally ANYTHING I'd posted was there for the taking, and this was images posted on Flickr, myspace, facebook, digital photographer forums {even password protected ones you register for}, and online gallery space.

    The basis of the story? We're in a digital world, and that means if you use digital files, then you can possibly lose them if you aren't careful and are careless. WATERMARK YOUR WORK PEOPLE! Buy a blog template that can keep your images sharp and make them super low res, so that you give NO ONE A REASON TO BE SHADY.

    Sitting here bitching about it, instead of stepping up and making sure your work is safe, is just lazy. Sorry.

  • General

    February 11, 2011 02:48 am

    The apps that allow short code right on a page have been a great tool to add a little more design to facebook

  • Marcie

    February 9, 2011 05:42 am

    Cheryl: Terms of Service.

  • cheryl

    February 9, 2011 03:22 am

    what is TOS?

  • Edson

    February 8, 2011 05:38 pm

    I opt not to post my photography on Facebook simply because their optimization settings really decrease the quality of anything you upload. It's really not worth sharing on a platform (in my opinion) that does not present your work nicely. Hopefully Facebook improves on this.

  • Denver Photography

    February 8, 2011 04:46 pm

    You have some really great suggestions here. I like all the stuff about your profile pictures.

  • Nick Karvounis

    February 7, 2011 09:56 pm

    Great Article, I have decided not upload any images but to add them via networked blogs! It works just perfect!

  • John Richardson

    February 6, 2011 05:13 pm

    Sorry, but Facebook is just not "the place", not only has it become over commercialized, but the copyright information and the privacy issues make it a bad risk. Stick with a dedicated photo blog.

  • danfigphoto

    January 27, 2011 07:22 am

    Remember, facebook is a public space (heck, the internet is a public space). Nothing private about it. Dont post it if you dont want the world to see it. Once it is uploaded, it is published. period.
    Be professional in everything you post.
    kudos,
    DanFig

  • Fida

    January 24, 2011 01:23 am

    Does anyone know how to add a "Reviews" tab on your Facebook fan page? It will be greatly appreciated. Thanks!

  • Josh

    January 22, 2011 02:54 pm

    I agree with the watermark comment made by Rob. I have never had any problems with facebook taking any of my photos and I have been using it as a marketing tool now for three years. Futhermore as time goes on it is proving to be more and more effective. Like Rob said your watermark will only spread your name more. And besides when all is said and done what are the odds your picture it going to show up anywhere, when anyone wishing to purchase a picture does not want it to be watermarked.

    Protect yourself by marketing yourself. A picture is worth a thousand words, but make sure one of those words is your name.

  • carla

    January 22, 2011 02:59 am

    I have heard Facebook "owns' Your images once you publish them on your page. is this true?
    How secure are photos on their website if you publish them at a low resolution?

  • Rob Clayton

    January 22, 2011 02:53 am

    There's a lot of talk here about Facebook acquiring the rights to any pics posted on its site by its users, and it seems this is putting people off using Facebook as a marketing tool. To me, this seems a bit like cutting your nose off to spite your face. Facebook can be a great (free) way to promote your business, and if your pics are watermarked with your logo/website address, then what difference if anyone else decides to use the image elsewhere?? The worst that they will be doing is promoting your business for you. Not such a terrible thing.....

  • Trep

    January 22, 2011 02:17 am

    Some folks have convinced themselves that they can't do effective marketing without a FB account. If you're one of these people, proceed with extreme caution. FB has an established track record of not recognizing the property or privacy rights of any member, photographer or otherwise. I STILL receive contact requests from a FB account I deactivated and asked to have deleted. I was told it might take two weeks for the deletion to take place. That was 4 months ago.

    If the privacy of your personal data or the rights to your images are of any significance to you, I would recommend keeping them off FB. If you're afraid that you can't market yourself without without being a FB user, it's quite possible to set up and use a FB account without providing a single piece of personal data and it's also possible to post only images which are protected in a way which renders them useless commercially. But this requires that you set up your account in a way which is not at all obvious when walking through FB's new member process.

    The one thing I absolutely would recommend against putting on FB are images of a personal or private nature, as there is no way to keep that content personal or private once it has been uploaded to FB. You might say "but that's the whole point of FB, to share my personal life with my friends and family" ... and I'd agree with you in so far as saying that this is what most people WANT to do with FB. The reality of FB, however, is that you're sharing this information not only with your F&F, but with anyone and everyone in the world.

    FB is rapidly becoming a place only safe for very carefully marketing carefully protected images and only that data which you WANT broadcast to the entire world. As a place for sharing personal or commercially viable content, its about as safe as leaving your home unlocked while you spend a month abroad.

    As photographers, understanding and controlling the rights to our images is nothing new. This has always best been handled up front, in writing, so that all concerned know what rights they do and do not have to any images created, before the first shot's been taken. ANY online service that does not grant you the photographer (or, similarly, model or snap-shot-taker) the right to completely control the destiny of your images is asking you to hand over your legal rights as though they were utterly unimportant.

    Would you drop off film to be processed by a lab that considered it their right to redistribute your images to whomever they liked? Would you keep your films or data in the safe deposit box of a bank that felt it their right to share your images with anyone who asked? Then don't hand over your images to online services that don't give you total control.

    Yes, folks, we're going to have to actually start READING those long and boring "terms of service" texts before we click on "I accept".

  • CS

    January 21, 2011 11:57 pm

    One HUGE thing you didn't mention. Facebook has a right to use any photo on Facebook without your permission because YOU gave them permission to do this when you joined Facebook. If you are a professional photographer then you know that you do not want to give away your professional work for FREE to anyone. And, your kids, family and friends might just pop up in a advertisement, etc. without you giving permission AGAIN because you already gave them permission to use any and all of your uploaded photos. And I'd like to point out that most sites have this fine print.

  • Peant

    January 21, 2011 11:06 pm

    Behind the scenes.
    Giving content to facebook means giving power to them as well. 6 new facebook accounts are registert every second, making 500.000 accounts A DAY at the moment. To facebook every user has a vlaue of 100 US$. Not only facebook, but other companies are specialiesed on scanning all the useres information, collect and cluster them. This companies sell this information to other companies, and you (or mainly your ip-adress, intelligent connected with technical stuff like cookies your browser accepts from other pages like amzon etc.) will let you get advertising depending your interrests*. This might not cause freightness to you, but what if this kind of information will be put in the wrong hands? Should your boss know, where you had been in your sparetime or that you bought a new car? Should your future boss see your last party pictures? Should your jealous colleague (and you even might not know, because he is smiling to you all day) how your children look like?

    Bad things often started harmless in history, until they had been misused!
    Reaserch, think and decide carefully before you blindly start to put your pictures (or any content) at social networks, etc (like this post ;-)

    I am aware of that post, but It is a social responsibility to tell

    [*Source: DER SPIEGEL, leading news-magazine in Germany]

  • sunscapes

    January 21, 2011 03:51 pm

    Once you've tagged a photo or someone else has tagged themselves, it shows up in their photo albums on their FB page... and when you delete that photo, it IS NOT deleted from those people's FB photos.. it's still on FB, until they delete it also. So, you may delete it, but if they don't delete also, it's still there making the rounds.

    I don't know what they've recently done, but I get all kinds of thumbnails from everyone that knows my friends too. When you click on Photos, you get a page of thumbs of everyone else's photos. It's confusing at least.

  • Lorbie

    January 21, 2011 01:34 pm

    about property rights..

    puting a watermark accross your image is always a good practice.

    :D

    although, never post a high resolution photo in the web.
    (this applies to any sites, even your own..) :D

  • Bellarina

    January 21, 2011 12:57 pm

    I highly suggest that if you use FB that you watermark everything - over the main section of the photograph especially of children. I recently know of a business page that had a photo of her daughter copied and used to create a fake profile overseas. I have now limited what photos I post to my business page and watermark boldly over all images.

  • JT

    January 21, 2011 12:12 pm

    I recall facebook serving notice that any photographs posted on the site were the property of facebook. I promptly deleted all the shots I have posted and I have not posted one since. I've heard they have rescinded this policy but I don't trust them.

  • Robert

    January 21, 2011 11:43 am

    Something you all should be aware of when using Face Book or anything else there are groups out there that go to any photo sharing sites and copy the photos of kids...then post them in a web site like http://imgsrc.su/
    and make comments that PREDICTORS make. The owner of that photo has no clue this is going on.
    We as photographers need to take a stand against this Remember guilty by association.

    Check out the listed web site put kids...girsl...boys...tweens..facebook and you see the comments.If you see one of your
    photos have it removed! This puts us as photographers in a pinch do we password the sites we use or leave it to public access

  • Kathie Roettger

    January 21, 2011 10:00 am

    Private messages are private, but if you send a message to more than one person and one person clicks reply and replies, then all other people that were sent the initial private message can see the reply.

  • Beebs

    January 21, 2011 08:01 am

    Re the T&C of facebook relating to property rights of your photos
    1.For content that is covered by intellectual property rights, like photos and videos ("IP content"), you specifically give us the following permission, subject to your privacy and application settings: you grant us a non-exclusive, transferable, sub-licensable, royalty-free, worldwide license to use any IP content that you post on or in connection with Facebook ("IP License").

    "SUBJECT TO YOUR PRIVACY AND APPLICATION SETTINGS": means that FB (and apps) can only use your photos if you have given them permission to do so in your privacy settings (e.g. with everyone, friends of friends, friends only, or other)

  • Dave

    January 21, 2011 07:48 am

    I don't see any information on Apples Aperture 3 in your tutorials or tips?

  • Jeff

    January 21, 2011 07:30 am

    Watermark well. Watermark in a way this difficult to crop off and lower the opacity a bit so that it is not too obstuctive. I'm currently working on this.

    Whether you use FB might just depend on your market and type of photography. I do mostly portrait photography. With over 300 sessions I've had only one client prefer to not have any images posted on FB, and I always ask. I am sharing ownership of these lower resolution and watermarked photos, but I get great PR, instant feedback, and plenty of business off of it as well.

    Now, if my business were in landscapes, it would be a different story altogether.

    Jeff

  • Bryan

    January 21, 2011 07:08 am

    As a relatively new photographer, I am all about letting Facebook or anyone else use my images. Yes, I'd like proper credit but I don't know too many people making huge amounts of money off selling their photos. I want my image out there to build my reputation. Besides, life is about tradeoffs. You aren't paying for Facebook so you should expect that there would be limitations on rights. If it were a paid service it would be an entirely different ballgame.

  • eric epie

    January 21, 2011 06:45 am

    Too bad you did not mention what's the best image size or resolution to look good on Facebook without sacrificing detail and quality, is there a minimum standard resolution for a 4x6 photo?

  • Gerry S

    January 21, 2011 06:16 am

    @ Stephen M- Exactly. This is where this article lost any credibility. Even with the updates, Facebook is far from excelling at photography.
    ===================
    Stephen McGrath Says:
    January 15th, 2011 at 2:34 am

    “Photography has historically been an area where Facebook excels…”
    What planet are you on?!!!

    Read more: http://www.digital-photography-school.com/what-every-photographer-needs-to-know-about-facebook#ixzz1BbXh9Q00

  • Kseniya Bulavko

    January 21, 2011 06:14 am

    I have the same problem, April. Same with sharing - when I try to share my website's new contest it wants to do it on my personal page and I can't find a way to change it...

  • Stephen F.

    January 21, 2011 06:08 am

    I always resize images before adding them to my Photography page. I never post anything over 1024 pixels at 96 dpi... I also use a program called Visial Watermark. It can resize and watermark 1 or 1000 pics and save them with a new file name or into another folder, ready for upload. As long as you don't post super high res images you should be ok. yes people will download them for wallpaper and probably share them with friends. But you always have your advertising built in... Mostly I post pics from group shoots... So clients pics won't be seen online... Unless they specifically want a digital version... More money for your wallet...

    Maybe adding a copyright blurb small on the bottom will help too... I really don't think Facebook will use my images. But if they do i want them to send me more fan base... So best to be FB search able...

  • Tallulah

    January 21, 2011 05:49 am

    The sad fact is that uploading photos to the internet makes them fair game for theft. Even if you watermark them, or sign them, or put them to the lowest resolution, from what I've been discovering from reading other's experiences, there will be someone out there who can steal and alter them. Even if you disallow copying of them, someone can use the snipping tool in Win 7 and get that photo.

    That has been my big concern with uploading my photos to places like Facebook (FB) and Flickr, and even my own website. I am not in the process of lowering the resolution of any of my photos, unless they are on my online shops, where I have to keep the resolution high for reproducing. It is a pain to do this, and unbelievably time consuming because I am on dial up (don't ask... it's my only option).

    I do have a FB page for my gallery, for the sole purpose in catching the attention of the millions of FB users, most of which will not have heard of me.... yet. ;-) I do not store large quantities of photos there. The plan is to upload one small image on a regular basis, to catch the attention of readers, to draw them to my website. It's early days yet, so I am not sure how useful this will be. Nothing ventured, nothing gained.

    @ solomon: if you want to build a website, you might want to look into Wordpress or Tabulas. My site is actually my blog on Tabulas. When I got the blog, years ago, Tabulas had two memberships: paid and free. I got a paid site. I have unlimited photo storage there. Now, I think Tabulas is all free... for now. Last week it was suggested that I look into WordPress as a website option, and I will give that a look too. I could still use Tabulas as my photo storage and blog, but create a website presence using WordPress, as apparently it allows for more creative layouts. Tabulas does too but I am not skilled at that. As for using FB, I would try it as a teaser for your website. Keep in mind that FB had millions of potential buyers... if you can catch their interest. I started a Page, not a separate FB account, just to make it easier for me to flit between the gallery page and my personal FB page.

    You would need to buy a domain name (check GoDaddy.com for that) and park it at your blog site.

    My site: www.gallerielyonesse.com
    My Gallery FB: http://www.facebook.com/talliebear#!/pages/Gallerie-Lyonesse/127714033928634

  • John Parli Photo

    January 21, 2011 05:31 am

    Regarding 'tagging'... do know that if you tag a photo of someone it will show on their page but if you have them tag the photo themselves it goes to everyone of their friend's news feeds. Just an fyi to anyone interested.

    Take Care!

  • Kenton Elliott

    January 21, 2011 05:26 am

    Definitely worth reading:
    http://www.businessinsider.com/10-reasons-to-delete-your-facebook-account-2010-5

  • Jonatahn

    January 21, 2011 05:07 am

    @amanda: There is no such thing as true right click protection for photos anywhere on the web. Anyone can disable javascript, which will stop such protection from working. Anyone can go to their browser's internet cache and copy the image from there. There are menus in browsers that give access to the source or elements used on the page, including the url of the images. They could even do a Print Screen of the browser window.

    Watermarking will deter in some cases, but if you don't want your image downloaded, the only real protection is not to upload it to the web!

  • Philbert Photography

    January 20, 2011 08:41 am

    There seems to be alot paranoid photographers here...let me add my spin to this conversation.

    If Facebook wants to use one of my Images (that I watermark) they can go right ahead.. free advertising. I dont post EVERY blasted thing but what I do post I am aware of the TOS.

    I had 5000+ friends I cleaned house, my Fan page I has 4500+ and counting everyday I make money and became known faster because of FB and use it to that advantage.

    What each of you who bitching forget is that for every friend a person who likes your page there's a chance that one of there friends will see your work. Everyone that does will appreciated and want to know who you are.

    If I shoot a popular model they usually have 4000+ or more friends I post a image and tag them .... some of them contact me for shoots some I would never meet other wise. I cant pay for that and its FREE!

    Stop griping about the TOS and use FB the way it supposed to be used and benefit for it.

    http://www.facebook.com/philbertphotography

  • Solomon

    January 18, 2011 01:52 pm

    Well up until just now I had my mind made up to start a FB for my photography only, it'd be something until I could build an actual web page but I now have to rethink that idea. I have a friend who has done it and to my knowledge hasn't had any issues. I Watermark my photos and thought that would be enough. Maybe back to the drawing board.

  • April

    January 18, 2011 01:54 am

    I have a Photography Fan page on FB.
    I want to know how to leave a comment on someone elses site and it be from my fan site and not from my personal site. (I've joined some groups, but when I comment it comes from my personal site)

    also... how can you get more fans then just your friends? How do you invite strangers?
    -Thanks

  • Brian

    January 18, 2011 01:45 am

    Gotta echo what Jason said about tagging. To me, that's the most important part about using Facebook to share images...

    I don't have a separate photography Facebook page, but I do share a lot of pictures. I'm in charge of the yearbook at the high school I teach at, and I routinely post some of our pictures to Facebook so the kids can see/comment on them. I almost never publish the images to my own newsfeed; I just tag the people in the pictures. This makes the images appear in the newsfeeds of those people, which lets all of their friends see the pictures. For better or worse, I get tons of friend requests because of this.

    I suppose this might be more problematic if you're sharing pictures of clients and you're not friends with them to tag them... but I would think it would be easy enough to get the cilents to tag themselves. People like to have their pictures tags; my kids do it all the time if I forget to tag them or if I'm not friends already to do it.

  • CASELAT

    January 17, 2011 06:42 am

    This doesn't seem to mention how annoying it is to get 100 page like requests a day for JOHN DOE PHOTOGRAPHY.

    Personally I stay away from facebook for this sort of thing because it's more an annoyance than anything else. Also because of the fact that just because someone goes and buys a DSLR at Costco doesn't mean you should feel the urge to start up a "Photography" page. But I rant... I'm normally not this cynical but it has gotten under my skin recently haha.

  • marcus

    January 17, 2011 04:00 am

    @Geren, I would report that to Facebook; it's not supposed to work that way. I've never seen a private message sent between any of my friends, nor have I had any of my friends report that they've seen any messages that I've sent. I've seen plenty of wall posts that looked like they meant to be sent as private messages, though. I've also seen people reply to mass messages as though there were only two parties to the conversation. If the message says "Between Some Friend and You" then only the two of you should be able to see it. If it says "Between Some Friend, Some Other Friend, Yet Another Friend, and you" then all of those people listed see every reply to the message. In essence, you're only option is to reply all, or another way to think of it, as a private discussion thread for the listed parties.

  • Geren W. Mortensen, Jr.

    January 16, 2011 07:27 pm

    @TJ: I've had supposedly private messages (sent using the send message) function seen by mutual friends.

  • Geren W. Mortensen, Jr.

    January 16, 2011 07:26 pm

    @Marcus: That's not been my experience.

  • Jason St. Petersburg Photographer

    January 15, 2011 07:25 pm

    That is a good stat to know about how many posts per week are optimum. I am always trying to be conscious of not flooding people's streams with posts, and always try to do the media status type update mentioned above. By unofficial observation I seem to add about 3-5 new people that like the page per week.

    http://www.facebook.com/jasoncollinphotography

    My profile photo is currently close to the 200x600 size. I have started to use the @FACEBOOKNAME system of tagging in status updates. For example if someone is in the photo I would use the @ system and also if a particular venue is in the photo, I first "like" that venue's page then use the @ system in my status post which makes the post also appear on the venue's wall.

  • Metacowboy

    January 15, 2011 07:07 pm

    Sorry but ther are some points that don't work "Optimize For Search" you will never find a photo on Facebook even not on a search engine as all Facebook pages are for robots No Follow no index .
    Its true foe your own webpage but not on Facebook images . Since Facebook Groups are gone even sharing a photo with a bigger community make no sense as if you share on a business page with a link it will count as spam . The only way to spread photos wide is with a app that get feeder the picture form your webspace .
    And as mentioned already you lose the rights on the picture as soon there are on Facebook .
    most film stuff similar licence problems get embedded same is possible with photos on a bigger scale.

  • Jen

    January 15, 2011 06:34 pm

    I agree with reena, photographers need to understand the TOS before deciding to upload to facebook. They will probably never sub-license your content or even use it, but you're giving them the rights, so you need to be aware of that. Especially if you are involved with any stock photography agencies.

    TJ - private messages are private, Geren is wrong.

  • TJ McDowell

    January 15, 2011 05:04 pm

    Geren,
    Are you talking about posting on someone else's wall or are you talking about the Send Message functionality? I would have thought the Send Message was indeed a private message. Has anyone else had experience with this?

  • j

    January 15, 2011 03:51 pm

    What's fairly evident in front of a judge is the fact that you've handed over all image rights to FB once you've agreed to the ToS. Watermark unapologetically.

  • Marcie

    January 15, 2011 03:29 pm

    I've read that Facebook is doing away with FBML. Is this true? Because it sounds like a perfect solution to adding customized content to pages.

    Also, I'm pretty sure FB allows only one account per email. I don't know if it matters whether the account is personal or business, but if you're setting up a second one, it's a good idea to use a different email.

  • Sharon

    January 15, 2011 03:16 pm

    I would like to learn more about how images can be copied from Facebook, and what can be done to stop that. With the opportunity to display high-res photos, it will be important to keep some control over copyrighted images. -- Sharon

  • Kiff Backhouse

    January 15, 2011 03:10 pm

    I think there is always something to worry about when your profession is all about licensing the rights to images and here you are just giving them to someone else to make use of as they wish, to alter as they wish and to pass on to any other business partner they wish.

    Don't you think that is a pretty big gamble to take?

    Me? I think i'll make everything I post to any site I don't control as small as possible and with a pretty hefty watermark...

  • Mario

    January 15, 2011 02:37 pm

    Some new changes are coming to facebook. They will no longer allow tabs or Photo's above 520 px.

  • Andrei

    January 15, 2011 01:58 pm

    do you think it's a best idea to promote your photography through facebook?

  • Rasmus Vedel

    January 15, 2011 10:42 am

    Something completely different, this is regarding Jayden Tan's "Stuck in Facebook" - how'd he do that?

    I mean, I understand that the five pictures way on top is the most recently tagged, and the three lower ones is a recent upload. But.. That little icon next to the recent upload isn't at all the same as his profile picture.. How!?

  • Matjaž

    January 15, 2011 10:24 am

    Marcus, the problem lies in "you grant us a non-exclusive, transferable, sub-licensable, royalty-free, worldwide license to use any IP content that you post on or in connection with Facebook"

    Where does it show that they're using ads next to your IP? And even if, this means that they can use my image(s) as banners (ads, billboards...) over and over again, wherever they please? F*** no.
    Just because they haven't used it yet, doesn't mean that they won't.

    In my mind, the best advice for photographers who want to use FB to promote their work - make sure that it has visible watermarks or logos, lower the resolution as much as possible ....

  • gina

    January 15, 2011 04:24 am

    Last I checked, anyone who has ability to see a pic can simply copy and paste the content elsewhere. Isn't that a concern for photographers?

  • marcus

    January 15, 2011 03:45 am

    reena, there's been much made of the Facebook ToS, I don't think there's much to worry about with the deletion clause. It seems fairly evident to me that their business model is based on selling ads to put next to your IP, not in sub-licensing your content.

  • marcus

    January 15, 2011 03:36 am

    Geren, that's only true if you post to someone's wall. If the message is sent as a message, it's only visible to the sender and the recipient(s).

  • LookingThroughLenses

    January 15, 2011 03:30 am

    So as a developing photographer, I've created my Facebook Page along with my website. I also have a Flickr account. I haven't shared any photos on my Fan Page, primarily because I was concerned about protecting my property. As I'm sure you all are aware, Flickr helps protect it, and I can add the disclaimer to my website. Does anyone else use all three mediums (Facebook, website, Flickr), or some combination thereof - and if so where do you publish new content - in all places?

  • Reena

    January 15, 2011 02:48 am

    The one thing that really bothers me about posts like this is that they always seem to gloss over the Terms of Service of Facebook. Perhaps we should have a post specifically about this.

    From the Facebook Terms of Service:
    For content that is covered by intellectual property rights, like photos and videos ("IP content"), you specifically give us the following permission, subject to your privacy and application settings: you grant us a non-exclusive, transferable, sub-licensable, royalty-free, worldwide license to use any IP content that you post on or in connection with Facebook ("IP License"). This IP License ends when you delete your IP content or your account unless your content has been shared with others, and they have not deleted it.

    The part that bothers me the most is:
    you grant us a non-exclusive, transferable, sub-licensable, royalty-free, worldwide license to use any IP content that you post on or in connection with Facebook

  • Stephen McGrath

    January 15, 2011 02:34 am

    "Photography has historically been an area where Facebook excels..."
    What planet are you on?!!!

    Furthermore, the only thing a photographer needs to know about Facebook is, DON'T!
    Quite simply, you put your photos on Facebook, you don't own them anymore. 'Nuff said.

  • Amy

    January 15, 2011 02:10 am

    Geren, there are controls you can use to limit who can see posts and links, including, "friends only" and "specific people."
    My question, though, is about the ability for people to download your posted images - since you can't turn that off. Are the business FB pages different, or do people still have the option to download high resolution copies of your image? I am careful about posting any of my pics online (at any site) since I seem to find people taking my photos and posting them as their own or changing the color tone and re-posting on other sites. I think it's kind of tacky to put a huge watermark on every photo but is that what you would recommend on these public sites?

  • Martin

    January 15, 2011 02:07 am

    Why I do not post my photos to Facebook. From their Terms section:

    1. For content that is covered by intellectual property rights, like photos and videos ("IP content"), you specifically give us the following permission, subject to your privacy and application settings: you grant us a non-exclusive, transferable, sub-licensable, royalty-free, worldwide license to use any IP content that you post on or in connection with Facebook ("IP License"). This IP License ends when you delete your IP content or your account unless your content has been shared with others, and they have not deleted it.

  • Amanda Botterweckhttp://amandasphotocreations.smugmug.com/

    January 15, 2011 01:48 am

    Are they going to create some kind of "right click" protection for those large res photos?

  • Alan Reinhold

    January 15, 2011 01:29 am

    This is all nice and all, but before you put any copyrighted material on the site, be sure to read the Terms of Service: (Excerpt from Facebook TERMS of service under section 2. Sharing Your Content and Information)

    Sharing Your Content and Information

    You own all of the content and information you post on Facebook, and you can control how it is shared through your privacy and application settings. In addition:
    For content that is covered by intellectual property rights, like photos and videos ("IP content"), you specifically give us the following permission, subject to your privacy and application settings: you grant us a non-exclusive, transferable, sub-licensable, royalty-free, worldwide license to use any IP content that you post on or in connection with Facebook ("IP License"). This IP License ends when you delete your IP content or your account unless your content has been shared with others, and they have not deleted it.

  • Geren W. Mortensen, Jr.

    January 15, 2011 12:43 am

    One thing you should know about "private" messages on facebook -- they're not entirely private. Messages between friends are also visible to mutual friends.

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