Slow It Down! Shooting At 1/20th Of A Second (With 15 Examples) - Digital Photography School
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Slow It Down! Shooting At 1/20th Of A Second (With 15 Examples)

Take a deep breath. Now let it out slowly.

We’re not in a yoga class, but a nice slow breath and steady shutter release finger will allow you to take your shutter speed to a new low. And by low, I mean slow; 1/20th of a second, for instance. While it is not the slowest shutter speed out there, 1/20th of a second can lead to some interesting effects; from causing intentional blur in waterfalls to allowing for available light shooting situations and increasing depth of field. Then throw in a tripod or solid surface and more options appear.

It’s not a popular shutter speed. You might not even rank it up there in your top ten, if you were forced to rank shutter speed preferences. Yet 1/20th is a fine place to start experimenting, and that’s one reason I like it so. It’s not always about using just 1/20th, but finding a sweet spot around it to capture the mood of a shot. It’s most easily accessed in Shutter Priority Mode (or Time Value Mode) which will allow the camera to choose the appropriate aperture for you, freeing your creative spirit to being playing with light in different ways.

Using Photoshop Lightroom recently I decided to sort by shutter speed (accessed by pressing \ and then choosing Metadata then changing a column to list out shutter speeds) and found I had a decent amount of shots grouped around this shutter speed. A surprising amount. Below are quick tips followed by some of my own shots to help inspire some experimenting on your part with this often ignored shutter speed.

  • Breathe – As mentioned, breath when you shoot. Your body is most relaxed when you exhale and this is a prime time to take a shot.
  • Press Through The Shutter Release – Don’t press down hard on the shutter release, this will cause shake more easily noticed at 1/20th. Press through the button, as if wishing to hit a spot just below the lowest it will go. This helps eliminate the “tap” effect.
  • Brace Yourself – Hold your camera properly. But don’t be too rigid! If you can, brace yourself against a solid object (building, car, lightpost, the ground, etc..).
  • Use A Tripod – They really do help, but I think you already knew this. 1/20th is much easier to achieve if your scene isn’t changing quickly and can allow for tripod use.
  • Practice – Practice – Practice!

[Click on images for larger version]

In The Souq - Fes, Morocco

Past Sunset On The Serengeti - Tanzania

Maui County Fair - Hawaii, USA

Belly Dancers - Costa Rica

Church Details - Malaga, Spain

In The Bar - Washington, USA

Torches At Sunset - Hawaii, USA

Flamingos In Nogorongoro Crater - Tanzania

Dessert! Lahaina Grill - Hawaii, USA

Kayaking The San Juan Islands - Washington, USA

Karen Blixen Museum - Kenya

Campfire At Semiahmoo Resort - Blaine, Washington, USA

Falls - Costa Rica

Kegs Awaiting Beer At Boundary Bay Brewery - Bellingham, Washington, USA

Harness At Piiholo Ranch - Maui, Hawaii, USA

Read more from our Tips & Tutorials category.

Peter West Carey is a world traveling photographer who now is spending a large amount of time going back through 6 years of travel photo and processing them like he should have to start with. He is also helping others learn about photography with the free series 31+ Days Of Photography Experiments which builds off of the 31+ Days To Better Photography series on his blog.

  • http://www.arlenfletcher.com/ Arlen Fletcher

    Good tips and another great article!

    Another tip for handheld shots with slow shutter speeds: If you have enough “body awareness” you can time your shutter release to be between heartbeats – a technique used by snipers to improve accuracy.

  • http://about.me/johncarney John Carney

    Given that most of the examples you’ve given are with a wide angle lens, it’s worth mentioning the old 1-over-the-focal-length rule. You can shoot comfortably up to about 1 divided by the focal length of your lens (in 35mm equivalent). So, 1/20th of a second is only a struggle when your focal length is much over 20mm. I love shooting in low light and at 1/20s, I can get reasonable results at up to about 75mm – or about two stops over the 1/l rule. Beyond that it becomes very, very difficult. So, you should add “choose the shortest lens you can” to the guidelines above :)

  • http://madaboutportraits.blogspot.com/ matabum, MaP blog

    i often use slow shutter when i’m shooting concerts with my 18-70 kit lens (my second and better concert lens is classic nifty fifty). i set my camera to manual, set high iso, slow shutter (for ex 1/20th) and f3.5 (best i can get with this bad lens) and stay like 18-25mm focal lenght. with this settings you cen get some really nice concert pictures that captures movement and atmosphere….

    this is a great example i think:
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/matabum/5337230774/

  • http://mark.s.carroll.angelfire.com/ Mark Carroll

    I routinely shoot at 1/30, but have never tried this slow. I am still on fllm but it should not matter. I use the same techniques that made me an expert shot, and which I leaned through a long time of training on the USMC range at Quantico.

    Breathe deep, let out on half, hold, steady, relax, focus, SQUEEZE the shutter, just like squeezing the trigger on an M14, hint. you should not know exactly when it will fire. Expect good results, Follow through keep pressing after the shutter fires, the same a as good trigger pull. The steady factor is a real aid, when I am in those situations i will try to find a physical object to place the camera against, but you can use your body if done correctly; elbows in close. Help to have a slow heart rate too, mine is typically below 50. This is invaluable in museums where no flash is allowed. Some rifle and pistol steady hold positions work well with a camera when outdoors such as the kneeling, sitting, and prone positions where the camera is supported by bone and ground.

  • ScottC

    Glad to see this article, handheld slow shutter speed shots are a very overlooked technique.

    This one is hand held at 1/6 (though the ISO is very high):

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/lendog64/5430871623/in/photostream/

  • http://www.kerstenbeck.com ErikKerstenbeck

    Hi

    Shooting with such a slow shutter speed handheld is quite challenging.

    I prefer to use a tripod an remote release so I am not worried about jerking the camera. This shot was taken at Seaport Village in San Diego using slow shutter speed, tripod and remote release. Notice how the ocean is nice and smooth!

    Seaport Village, San Diego: http://t.co/3mzFpA1

    Regards, Erik
    Kerstenbeck Photographic Art

  • http://krisskrasowski.blogspot.com/ kriss

    nice photos ant tips that i will use :) Thanx!

  • http://kirantarun.com/lens Kiran

    I must admit I am thankful for this tips. I’ve always struggle taking motion shots – like dancing, fire, fireworks, anything with moving objects! Thanks and I shall try it :)

  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/confusedsam sumit

    Nice article. The past few weeks somehow I have invariably ended up in circumstances where I had to use speed less than 1/20 and though not very comfortable to begin with thanks to the sensitivity to motion, am beginning to love and explore the opportunities that the speed presents. Also allows the beginners (like me) to break away from the regular pattern.

  • WBC

    Nice article and examples, I have to admit that outside of low light, or on a tripod for blur, I have not done much with intentionally going to a slow shutter speed while hand holding… I will have to play with that.

    A quick search on Joe McNally’s video of “Da grip” works pretty well… at least for me it really lets me steady the camera even more, combine it with all the other techniques and you feel rock solid. I also combine this with wrapping my camera strap around my arm, and also once I am ready grabbing my shirt with my free hand and pulling it in more.

    Love your articles!

  • http://photos.rickscheibner.net Rick

    Nice idea. And if you have image stabilization, you should easily be able to handhold that shot and keep still areas reasonably sharp while still capturing whatever movement is taking place.

  • http://www.ScottLarsen.com Scott Larsen

    Great article although I wish you had addressed the shutter speed vs. focal length issue. A clear image at 1/20th is easily attainable at 20mm whereas it’s impossible, without a tripod, at 200mm. Your examples bear this out but I’m afraid some novices will just set their camera to 1/20th and wonder why they can’t get the same results. Thanks for a thought provoking article and some great, illustrative shots. I particularly like the fair shot.

  • http://www.karinpennington.tumblr.comandwww.kpenni.tumblr.com Karin Pennington

    Thanks, I am going to try shooting slower…I’m learning and your photos really help me!

  • http://tombstonetumbleweed.blogspot.com/ doodles

    Your posts help make me a better informed photo taker and for that I thank you. BTW this is the very best site for all things photography I have seen or participated in

  • http://www.teakfurniturenow.com Jim Hughes

    Excellent tips, especially the breathing tip.

  • David

    With slow shutter speeds I find that pressing the button with the second section of my index finger gives a smoother action than with the end of the finger.

  • http://flickriver.com/photos/rickyliew/ RickyLiew

    Perhaps one should consider to use mirror lock up feature available in most of the SLR nowadays for slow shutter hand held shooting. I know you gotta hang on a while after the first press on the shutter before you second pressed on the shutter, it really shortened the response time between the shutter open and the time you pressed the shutter. I have tried this on several slow shutter shots like 1/20th and it works very fine for me!

  • Scott Lewis

    I’ve found that giving up caffeine has improved my slower shutter speed shooting. Still, the basics of breathing and how to work that shutter release button need a lot of practice. Any kind of shooting whether with weapon or camera is more accurate with the techniques you mention. In pistol shooting a common quote is “slow down to go fast”. When speed AND accuracy matter, taking just enough time to do it right is the winning combo. The photographic equivalent isn’t so much about aim as it is steadiness but it amounts to the the same thing.

  • http://www.ihatepapyrus.info/blog/ Zak

    Awesome tips. But…how is it that even though you take amazing pictures and clearly have strong artistic sensibilities, you still use Papyrus font on all of your images? I don’t mean to be rude, but I’ve noticed it in each of your posts and I’m puzzled. It’s widely regarded as one of the most badly misused and abused fonts in existence, so much that even when used legitimately it turns people away in horror at its awfulness. I would strongly suggest finding a less conspicuous font.

  • http://flickr.com/photos/salver sal Vera

    WOW!! I just shoot with the breath tip,amazing results,,thanks,thanks

  • http://www.kerstenbeck.com Erik Kerstenbeck

    Hi

    Here are two more views of Seaport Village in San Diego taken from different perspectives and times of day but with slow shutter speeds. The slow shutter smooths out the waves on the San Diego Bay

    Seaport Village II: http://t.co/Xeb4Agb

    Seaport Village III: http://t.co/ItIGH2R

    Regards, Erik
    Kerstenbeck Photographic Art

  • af

    I particularly like the kegs, but find myself wondering if this particular shot would really look any different if shot at 1/100. Ditto the saddlery.
    Interesting post.

  • Carlos

    A feature that some cameras have that might be helpful in avoiding shaking the camera is a shorter countdown like 2 seconds.

  • Mike Thorsen

    Just a note: equine accessories are known as “Tack”.

  • Matt

    SInce dPs is an educational resource, and I’m a learner, I’d like to propose an answer @Af (Without EXIF) I can just guess you’d be losing Depth of Field and natural light feel… faster shutter would require larger aperture, higher ISO or more light (AKA Flash). Isn’t 1/20 v 1/100 over 2 stops less light that would have to be picked up somewhere.

  • Trep Ford

    The name of this article caught my eye, as I’ve also recently found myself quite surprised to find how often I use this and similar speed settings, compared to what I would have guessed. Now, with that said, I should add that I use this speed range a lot MORE now that all my cameras have built in image stabilization (IS). In the “old days”, before IS and its brothers and sisters, low speeds worked best for me with a tripod, as my choice of subjects tended to keep either me or the subject moving. But now that IS is built into everything I own, I find that if I follow the kind of advice Peter gives here, I do quite well in this speed range. And, depending on the subject, if there is just a bit of blur, it can often be quite charming.

    In general, I used to avoid shooting at speeds less than the focal length of the lens I was using. 1/250th for 200, 1/125th for 100, 1/60 for 50, etc. This worked very well for me when I was off a tripod and did not yet have IS. Then, one day, I was looking at the data for some shots I’d taken during a day trip with my newer gear and saw how many great shots were made at really low speeds compared to what I was used to. Who knew?

    Shooting with my wife also helped me. While I was always pretty patient when working with models, I tended to get rushed when shooting on day trips or when traveling. My wife taught me (by example) to take more time with ALL my subjects, which tends to slow down the pace, add to body and hand stability, add maturity to shot selection and lots of other good things which supported shooting at lower speeds.

    Great stuff, Peter. Keep ‘em coming.

  • http://www.singaporegrooms.com Singapore wedding photography

    tried 1/20th sec with flash? came up with pretty interesting photos…going try it at lower speed next.

  • Rob

    With Image Stabilization or Vibration Reduction for the Nikon users out there with me, this definitely helps with the lower shutter speeds where you want to capture the lighting without blur, but sometimes I turn it off to get the absolute desired blur that I want. Regardless, low shutter speeds such as 1/20 sec are fun to experiment with and bring a whole new sense of life to portraits & landscapes. Great subject to bring up!

  • http://thecareyadventures.com/blog Peter West Carey

    af, They had to be shot at 1/20th because of low light in both of those cases. If I went up to 1/100th or so, I’d be losing more than two stops of light and the aperture was already open all the way. I didn’t want higher ISO so there you have it.

  • Justin Donie

    Peter, love your stuff! Thanks for all you do for us here. Glad to see someone from our region contributing so much.

  • PhilR

    Nice article, and clicked through to some excellent links on your site – cheers! :-)

  • marietta

    heading for the Smokies and will try 20 even without a tripod…mine’s a heavy one and I cant always carry it near the falls…usually use 15 for water…this will be a fun adventure…loved the softness of unlikely subjects thank you ! marietta

  • http://www.espionaj.com Janice Ng

    Does this work for point and shoot as well?

Some older comments

  • Janice Ng

    March 19, 2011 12:45 am

    Does this work for point and shoot as well?

  • marietta

    March 9, 2011 12:37 am

    heading for the Smokies and will try 20 even without a tripod...mine's a heavy one and I cant always carry it near the falls...usually use 15 for water...this will be a fun adventure...loved the softness of unlikely subjects thank you ! marietta

  • PhilR

    February 20, 2011 08:31 am

    Nice article, and clicked through to some excellent links on your site - cheers! :-)

  • Justin Donie

    February 19, 2011 12:12 pm

    Peter, love your stuff! Thanks for all you do for us here. Glad to see someone from our region contributing so much.

  • Peter West Carey

    February 19, 2011 08:22 am

    af, They had to be shot at 1/20th because of low light in both of those cases. If I went up to 1/100th or so, I'd be losing more than two stops of light and the aperture was already open all the way. I didn't want higher ISO so there you have it.

  • Rob

    February 19, 2011 03:02 am

    With Image Stabilization or Vibration Reduction for the Nikon users out there with me, this definitely helps with the lower shutter speeds where you want to capture the lighting without blur, but sometimes I turn it off to get the absolute desired blur that I want. Regardless, low shutter speeds such as 1/20 sec are fun to experiment with and bring a whole new sense of life to portraits & landscapes. Great subject to bring up!

  • Singapore wedding photography

    February 18, 2011 07:48 pm

    tried 1/20th sec with flash? came up with pretty interesting photos...going try it at lower speed next.

  • Trep Ford

    February 18, 2011 09:10 am

    The name of this article caught my eye, as I've also recently found myself quite surprised to find how often I use this and similar speed settings, compared to what I would have guessed. Now, with that said, I should add that I use this speed range a lot MORE now that all my cameras have built in image stabilization (IS). In the "old days", before IS and its brothers and sisters, low speeds worked best for me with a tripod, as my choice of subjects tended to keep either me or the subject moving. But now that IS is built into everything I own, I find that if I follow the kind of advice Peter gives here, I do quite well in this speed range. And, depending on the subject, if there is just a bit of blur, it can often be quite charming.

    In general, I used to avoid shooting at speeds less than the focal length of the lens I was using. 1/250th for 200, 1/125th for 100, 1/60 for 50, etc. This worked very well for me when I was off a tripod and did not yet have IS. Then, one day, I was looking at the data for some shots I'd taken during a day trip with my newer gear and saw how many great shots were made at really low speeds compared to what I was used to. Who knew?

    Shooting with my wife also helped me. While I was always pretty patient when working with models, I tended to get rushed when shooting on day trips or when traveling. My wife taught me (by example) to take more time with ALL my subjects, which tends to slow down the pace, add to body and hand stability, add maturity to shot selection and lots of other good things which supported shooting at lower speeds.

    Great stuff, Peter. Keep 'em coming.

  • Matt

    February 18, 2011 08:22 am

    SInce dPs is an educational resource, and I'm a learner, I'd like to propose an answer @Af (Without EXIF) I can just guess you'd be losing Depth of Field and natural light feel... faster shutter would require larger aperture, higher ISO or more light (AKA Flash). Isn't 1/20 v 1/100 over 2 stops less light that would have to be picked up somewhere.

  • Mike Thorsen

    February 18, 2011 05:04 am

    Just a note: equine accessories are known as "Tack".

  • Carlos

    February 18, 2011 04:12 am

    A feature that some cameras have that might be helpful in avoiding shaking the camera is a shorter countdown like 2 seconds.

  • af

    February 17, 2011 10:57 am

    I particularly like the kegs, but find myself wondering if this particular shot would really look any different if shot at 1/100. Ditto the saddlery.
    Interesting post.

  • Erik Kerstenbeck

    February 17, 2011 02:19 am

    Hi

    Here are two more views of Seaport Village in San Diego taken from different perspectives and times of day but with slow shutter speeds. The slow shutter smooths out the waves on the San Diego Bay

    Seaport Village II: http://t.co/Xeb4Agb

    Seaport Village III: http://t.co/ItIGH2R

    Regards, Erik
    Kerstenbeck Photographic Art

  • sal Vera

    February 15, 2011 05:35 pm

    WOW!! I just shoot with the breath tip,amazing results,,thanks,thanks

  • Zak

    February 15, 2011 02:06 pm

    Awesome tips. But...how is it that even though you take amazing pictures and clearly have strong artistic sensibilities, you still use Papyrus font on all of your images? I don't mean to be rude, but I've noticed it in each of your posts and I'm puzzled. It's widely regarded as one of the most badly misused and abused fonts in existence, so much that even when used legitimately it turns people away in horror at its awfulness. I would strongly suggest finding a less conspicuous font.

  • Scott Lewis

    February 15, 2011 01:49 am

    I've found that giving up caffeine has improved my slower shutter speed shooting. Still, the basics of breathing and how to work that shutter release button need a lot of practice. Any kind of shooting whether with weapon or camera is more accurate with the techniques you mention. In pistol shooting a common quote is "slow down to go fast". When speed AND accuracy matter, taking just enough time to do it right is the winning combo. The photographic equivalent isn't so much about aim as it is steadiness but it amounts to the the same thing.

  • RickyLiew

    February 14, 2011 12:59 pm

    Perhaps one should consider to use mirror lock up feature available in most of the SLR nowadays for slow shutter hand held shooting. I know you gotta hang on a while after the first press on the shutter before you second pressed on the shutter, it really shortened the response time between the shutter open and the time you pressed the shutter. I have tried this on several slow shutter shots like 1/20th and it works very fine for me!

  • David

    February 14, 2011 09:22 am

    With slow shutter speeds I find that pressing the button with the second section of my index finger gives a smoother action than with the end of the finger.

  • Jim Hughes

    February 14, 2011 05:02 am

    Excellent tips, especially the breathing tip.

  • doodles

    February 14, 2011 04:47 am

    Your posts help make me a better informed photo taker and for that I thank you. BTW this is the very best site for all things photography I have seen or participated in

  • Karin Pennington

    February 14, 2011 04:40 am

    Thanks, I am going to try shooting slower...I'm learning and your photos really help me!

  • Scott Larsen

    February 14, 2011 04:25 am

    Great article although I wish you had addressed the shutter speed vs. focal length issue. A clear image at 1/20th is easily attainable at 20mm whereas it's impossible, without a tripod, at 200mm. Your examples bear this out but I'm afraid some novices will just set their camera to 1/20th and wonder why they can't get the same results. Thanks for a thought provoking article and some great, illustrative shots. I particularly like the fair shot.

  • Rick

    February 14, 2011 04:18 am

    Nice idea. And if you have image stabilization, you should easily be able to handhold that shot and keep still areas reasonably sharp while still capturing whatever movement is taking place.

  • WBC

    February 14, 2011 04:08 am

    Nice article and examples, I have to admit that outside of low light, or on a tripod for blur, I have not done much with intentionally going to a slow shutter speed while hand holding... I will have to play with that.

    A quick search on Joe McNally's video of "Da grip" works pretty well... at least for me it really lets me steady the camera even more, combine it with all the other techniques and you feel rock solid. I also combine this with wrapping my camera strap around my arm, and also once I am ready grabbing my shirt with my free hand and pulling it in more.

    Love your articles!

  • sumit

    February 14, 2011 03:52 am

    Nice article. The past few weeks somehow I have invariably ended up in circumstances where I had to use speed less than 1/20 and though not very comfortable to begin with thanks to the sensitivity to motion, am beginning to love and explore the opportunities that the speed presents. Also allows the beginners (like me) to break away from the regular pattern.

  • Kiran

    February 14, 2011 03:49 am

    I must admit I am thankful for this tips. I've always struggle taking motion shots - like dancing, fire, fireworks, anything with moving objects! Thanks and I shall try it :)

  • kriss

    February 14, 2011 03:00 am

    nice photos ant tips that i will use :) Thanx!

  • ErikKerstenbeck

    February 14, 2011 02:28 am

    Hi

    Shooting with such a slow shutter speed handheld is quite challenging.

    I prefer to use a tripod an remote release so I am not worried about jerking the camera. This shot was taken at Seaport Village in San Diego using slow shutter speed, tripod and remote release. Notice how the ocean is nice and smooth!

    Seaport Village, San Diego: http://t.co/3mzFpA1

    Regards, Erik
    Kerstenbeck Photographic Art

  • ScottC

    February 14, 2011 02:13 am

    Glad to see this article, handheld slow shutter speed shots are a very overlooked technique.

    This one is hand held at 1/6 (though the ISO is very high):

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/lendog64/5430871623/in/photostream/

  • Mark Carroll

    February 14, 2011 01:54 am

    I routinely shoot at 1/30, but have never tried this slow. I am still on fllm but it should not matter. I use the same techniques that made me an expert shot, and which I leaned through a long time of training on the USMC range at Quantico.

    Breathe deep, let out on half, hold, steady, relax, focus, SQUEEZE the shutter, just like squeezing the trigger on an M14, hint. you should not know exactly when it will fire. Expect good results, Follow through keep pressing after the shutter fires, the same a as good trigger pull. The steady factor is a real aid, when I am in those situations i will try to find a physical object to place the camera against, but you can use your body if done correctly; elbows in close. Help to have a slow heart rate too, mine is typically below 50. This is invaluable in museums where no flash is allowed. Some rifle and pistol steady hold positions work well with a camera when outdoors such as the kneeling, sitting, and prone positions where the camera is supported by bone and ground.

  • matabum, MaP blog

    February 14, 2011 01:38 am

    i often use slow shutter when i'm shooting concerts with my 18-70 kit lens (my second and better concert lens is classic nifty fifty). i set my camera to manual, set high iso, slow shutter (for ex 1/20th) and f3.5 (best i can get with this bad lens) and stay like 18-25mm focal lenght. with this settings you cen get some really nice concert pictures that captures movement and atmosphere....

    this is a great example i think:
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/matabum/5337230774/

  • John Carney

    February 14, 2011 01:31 am

    Given that most of the examples you've given are with a wide angle lens, it's worth mentioning the old 1-over-the-focal-length rule. You can shoot comfortably up to about 1 divided by the focal length of your lens (in 35mm equivalent). So, 1/20th of a second is only a struggle when your focal length is much over 20mm. I love shooting in low light and at 1/20s, I can get reasonable results at up to about 75mm - or about two stops over the 1/l rule. Beyond that it becomes very, very difficult. So, you should add "choose the shortest lens you can" to the guidelines above :)

  • Arlen Fletcher

    February 14, 2011 01:29 am

    Good tips and another great article!

    Another tip for handheld shots with slow shutter speeds: If you have enough "body awareness" you can time your shutter release to be between heartbeats - a technique used by snipers to improve accuracy.

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