Nikon D600 Review - Digital Photography School
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Nikon D600 Review

There appears to be a move towards increasing the number of camera models with full frame (ie 24x36mm) sensors. Sony, for one, has even released a fixed mirror DSLR model with a full frame sensor.

Nikon D600.jpg

Going back to the film camera days companies just couldn’t leave 35mm alone: Kodak stupidly tried the disk camera taking 11x8mm exposures … and the pictures were woeful!

Then came the 110 format, ballooning up to a magnificent 13x17mm, producing pictures that were a little better but still suffering from a lag in photographic chemistry that continued to produce grainy images.

Earlier, we had seen the 126 format with 28x28mm images. This managed to capture a decent market share.

Another one from the same time was the half frame format (18x24mm) that attracted a decent sector of the buying public and even led to some pretty innovative camera designs, especially from Olympus.

More recently, and just prior to the emergence of digital cameras was the ill-fated APS-C format (25.1×16.7mm). IMHO this format only managed to accelerate the demise of film cameras by confusing the buying public.

So the struggle still goes on. Currently, we are surrounded by compact digital models that have sensors that range all the way down to 11mm and smaller … the size of a fingernail.

These are perfectly capable of making decent and sharp 10x15cm happy snap prints, but little larger due to the emergence of noise in the images.

If you need higher quality digital images you must head north to at least 17mm diagonal sensors or, even better, APS-C sized cameras in the guise of Sony’s NEX (23.4×15.6 mm) and Canon’s EOS-M model (22.3 x 14.9 mm). These not only offer a larger sensor but take you to interchangeable lens land.

So we eventually arrive at full frame sensor territory.

Nikon D600 side.jpg

Nikon D600 back.jpg

Nikon D600 top.jpg

With this model under review, the Nikon D600, we can enjoy full frame CMOS capture and access to Nikon’s famed range of interchangeable lenses.

But … we also get to ‘enjoy’ the pleasures of a full size camera that, when loaded with the review f3.5/24-85mm lens, tipped the scales at a (to me) significant 1.3kg. Out and about, you certainly (and passers-by) know you’re carrying a serious DSLR!

You also get to delight in the costs of full frame lenses which, when they reach the extreme wide or tele ends, tip the dollar scales to an extraordinary level.
Bougainvillea 1.JPG

Cafe and VW Kombi 1.JPG

But, if you want 35mm quality, the D600 is surely the way to go, price and design-wise.

Layout

I found the camera easy to get used to, with external controls sensibly laid out: mode dial on top left, with choice of single or multiple frame capture control made from the concentric ring beneath; at right is the shutter button, video record, exposure correction and metering area nearby. Mode dial is forward of the shutter button. The auto focus/manual button is set into the lens barrel’s left side (viewed from behind).

Front: flash operation and bracketing buttons plus one for AF mode.
At rear left are buttons for menu, choice of picture style, white button, quality/size, ISO setting.

Rear right is where the main command dial is found and the OK button, video/still selector, plus Live View and others.

D600_LCDmenuE1.jpg

Nikon D600 Features

The camera’s 24.3 megapixel CMOS captures a maximum image size of 6016×4016 pixels that can deliver a 51x34cm print made at 300 dpi.

In movies it can record excellent quality, Full HD with 1920×1080 pixels. I have to say that, on my shooting safaris, it was a delight to shoot stills alongside video clips, with the changeover between formats a very simple chore. To record video it was a simple task to tap the red button sited next to the stills shutter button. The only downer was that, while videoing, if I hit the shutter button the video record was interrupted.

In the movie which accompanies this review you may notice some unwanted artefacts, due to the dull day shooting and subsequent necessary lifting of the exposure levels and colour saturation in iMovie software.

Movie wise, uncompressed movie data can be output to an external recorder via the built-in HDMI interface.

The camera is claimed to be the ‘lightest and smallest FX-format (full frame) DSLR camera’ on the market and, if you sit it beside its peers, it certainly echoes that claim.

Smaller it may be but it’s also equipped with the same EXPEED 3 high-speed image-processing engine that’s built into the D4, D800, and D800E Nikon FX-format cameras

I found, in use, that the camera performed very well on low light and gave an outstanding performance with its AF system that tracked subjects with 39 focus points and cross-type sensors that sensed the nine most frequently used focus points at the centre of frame.

Viewing is via the delightful optical viewfinder at the top of the camera or the large 8.1cm LCD screen at rear, activated as a Live View function. I found the former to be excellent in bright light, with the LCD failing badly in the same conditions. Unfortunately, the screen can neither be tilted or swung.

There is no CompactFlash card slot but there are twin SD/SDHC/SDXC card slots; the pair can be used in overflow fashion, as sequential backup or separately set up to record JPEG in one and RAW in the other. Mighty handy!

Time lapse menu.jpg

There is a time lapse feature which is one of the options in the movie settings. The camera takes photographs at a preselected interval, with the memory card access lamp lighting up when each shot is captured. The camera then assembles the images and records them as a silent video.
Some pros may scoff but there is an inbuilt flash that has a guide number of 12m at ISO 100. Useful as a fill light.

There is a wireless connection that can download images from an Eye-Fi card or control two external flash units and even operate the camera remotely.

Nikon D600 ISO Tests

Nikon 600D ISO 100.JPG

Nikon 600D ISO 400.JPG

Nikon 600D ISO 800.JPG

Nikon 600D ISO 1600.JPG

Nikon 600D ISO 3200.JPG

Nikon 600D ISO 6400.JPG

All the way to ISO 3200 the D600 took clean shots with very little noise. Only at ISO 6400 was there some evidence of noise but sharpness still held up, making it a very useable setting.

House and flame tree.JPG

Nikon D600 Review Verdict

Quality: excellent (of course!)

Why you would buy the Nikon D600: you want full frame quality at a reasonable price and luggable weight/size.

Why you wouldn’t buy the Nikon D600: no vari-angle screen.

An impressive camera. Should sell in truckloads.

Nikon D600 Specifications

Image Sensor: 35.9×24.0mm CMOS. 24.3 million effective pixels.
Metering: Matrix, centre-weighted, averaging and spot.
Effective Sensor Size: full frame 35.9x24mm CMOS.
A/D processing: 12- or 14-bit.
Lens Mount: Nikon F.
Exposure Modes: Auto, Program AE, shutter and aperture priority, manual.
Shutter Speed: Bulb, 30 to 1/4000 second, Bulb. Flash X-sync: up to 1/200 sec.
Continuous Speed: 5.5fps in FX full frame mode.
Memory: SD/SDHC/SDXC UHS-I compliant cards. Two slots.
Image Sizes (pixels): 6016×4016 to 1968×1112. Movies: 1920×1080, 1280×720 at 24/25/30fps.
Viewfinders: Eye level pentaprism and 8.1cm LCD (921,000 pixels).
File Formats: NEF (RAW), JPEG, NEF (RAW)+JPEG, MPEG4.
Colour Space: Adobe RGB, sRGB.
ISO Sensitivity: Auto, 100 to 6400. With expansion down to ISO 50 and up to 25,600.
Interface: USB 3.0, AV, HDMI mini, DC input, external stereo mic, headphone output, remote.
Power: Rechargeable lithium ion battery, AC adaptor.
Dimensions: 141x113x82 WHDmm.
Weight: Approx. 850 g (with battery and SD card).
Price: get a price on the Nikon D600 body only or with a 24-85mm f/3.5-4.5G ED VR AF-S Nikkor Lens or with 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6G ED Nikkor Lens.

Summary
Reviewer
Barrie Smith
Review Date
Reviewed Item
Nikon D600
Author Rating
4

Read more from our Cameras & Equipment category.

Barrie Smith is an experienced writer/photographer currently published in Australian Macworld, Auscam and other magazines in Australia and overseas.

  • http://tuimages.co.nz Teri

    What’s with the random introduction to the demise of film photography and then veering off into the review? Was interesting enough (I haven’t looked into it at all) but seemed pretty out of place with the review. I would have preferred to see that part removed (or maybe moved to a different article) and having more “reviewing” going on – maybe comparing the D600 to other cameras that people might be moving up from in terms of handling/performance.

  • Manoaboy808

    I can see that sensor smudge problem in your high iso shot. but do not fear, it goes away. you just have to clean it once or twice after the first couple thousand shots.

  • Barrie Smith

    To Teri:
    this is for those who have come into digital photography late and explains why we have many cameras with small sensors and others (and more expensive!) with larger sensors. And the benefits of larger sensors.
    Not everyone has the benefit of a photographic experience and faced the negatives of tiny film frames!
    He who ignores history …

  • George Osborne

    Easy to follow review. The major downside for me is the lack of bracketing range only 3, if you need to do HDR or blending in Photoshop with large light contrast it is a non starter. I would have added the camera to my D300S but for this reason.

  • http://www.vale-images.co.uk Ceri Vale

    To George Osbourne (? really)

    Although I’ve yet to try any HDR work, I would say the camera’s dynamic range is SO impressive 3 bracketed shots will wholly serve your purpose. The amount of highlight and shadow recovery that’s possible is nothing short of astounding.

  • Peter Williams

    I am fed up reading these glowing reports about the Nikon D600. They do not mention the problem of dust spots and excess oil dots appearing on images after, in my case, the first 100 images taken. I have had two D600′s both with the same issue. Eventually Nikon UK admitted that there was a problem with the sensor which has been much talked about on forums worldwide. How do reviewers never see or mention these issues. Sometimes I wonder how independent these reviews really are.
    Nikon now say that the issue disappears after the first 3000 activations. Is this the new quality standard of Nikon.?
    I reported the problem to one of the UK’s Nikon users publications. They acknowledged the problem in my first e mail but when I suggested the print a comment in their next publication highlighting the issue they did not reply. So much for the independent publisher.

  • Peter Williams

    Actually if you look at the the ISO images in your article you will see the famous dust spots on every image. Dont see you commenting on this in your article. Now the whole world can see what I am talking about. On both my D600′S the spots was appeared in the left hand to middle side of the image as in yours above. Is this the new standard of Nikon ?

  • http://penelopesoasis.com Penelope

    Mine had spots on the sensor…the quality control on this one seems to be a problem for many :(

  • Bob

    Mine, too has spots/smudges on the sensor, very annoying but fixable in Photoshop. Does anyone know if/how Nikon is resolving this issue?

  • Girish

    Doesnt that Orange ever rot? It has been seen in all the reviews on his site :-)

  • http://www.joe-elliott.co.uk Joe Elliott

    I really have been thinking a lot about a camera upgrade the D5100 i have outgrown and the noise at high ISOs can be a nuisance might have a go at this one, thanks for your review…

  • Joven

    @ Peter

    Should the reviewer stone the D600 now when 1) the issue seems to disappear after 1000 shots? What if the issue is resolved in the next month – does that mean the sensor is any less impressive? I have a D600 and spots have been as big of an issue for me as others (over 1,500 shots in), and to be honest, I haven’t been changing my lenses in perfect conditions.

    I’ll clean my sensor around 3K shots and will do so from here on out. It’s like owning a car and being pissed you have to change the tires. Yeah, the original tires aren’t as great as they should have been, and it’ll piss you off, but once you get it squared away, you’re left with a great car. The images and experiences I’ve had with this camera don’t make me miss my D5100.

  • Joven

    correction to previous post:

    the spots HAVEN’T been as big of an issue*

  • anthony

    There is a long discussion about dust and Manu use a rocket blower to get rid of the dust….don’t let that issue judge your buying choice of this camera…..I bought mine 2 weeks ago with a Nikkor 50mm f/1.4 and its a huge upgrade from the D5000…..takes really sharp pictures and wonderful low light

  • http://www.vale-images.co.uk Ceri Vale

    @Peter Williams

    I really am bored reading about dust/oil problems. Yes, they’ve over-oiled some moving parts and yes, there’s excessive dust. I clean the sensor regularly…ergo, I have no problems.

    The machine is a joy to use

  • Peter Gowdy

    You call this a review? Check Thom Hogan for a real review:
    http://www.bythom.com/d600.htm

  • Peter Williams

    My original point was that when you spend 2299 euro on a new camera from a world leader such as Nikon, you expect the quality to be perfect. This was not my experience and others also have found this not to be the case.
    If some people are happy to use photoshop to remove Nikon’s mess that is fine for them. If you think buying a rocket blower is the solution go ahead – ask Santa for one with your new “quality D600″. If you really want to see worse try using HDR – it spurts dozens of black oil specs over the image.
    My issue is I DID NOT GET WHAT I PAID FOR .

    I agree the D600 is an excellent camera producing high quality images with some nice features apart from the dust and oil. I am sure there are some D600′s that have no issue – I had two of them and did’nt want a third.
    I have been a Nikon user for many years having started with a Nikon FM2 moving to a D40 and then to the D90, So I dont take any enjoyment out of being critical regarding Nikon’s quality control. All I want is that reviewers tell the truth and do not mislead people into purchasing something that is effectively faulty.
    I dont think that Canon, Sony or any camera manufacturer in the world would be proud of the pictures above representing a new “perfect” product.
    Despite my D600 issues I remain loyal to Nikon’s technology. I have recently purchased the D800 and am perfectly happy with it. I am sorry but I have no faith in the D600 nor ever will.

    I am surprised that I have had no response from the author of the review, DPS or NIKON.
    I THINK THE REALITY IS THAT NOBODY CARES AND ITS ALL ABOUT SALES NOT QUALITY OR THE CUSTOMER BEING HAPPY.

  • http://jyvesphotos.com Yves Jardon

    From the D70 I change to the D90 and now to the D600 with the 24-70 f2.8 lens, and the differences are amazing, D600 is fast and sharp, low noise in high iso, my way to take photos change a lot with more liberty mainly in the control of the depth of field. Yes I had problems of dust, easily remove from the sensor as Ceri Vale says. Some other problems in low light with the auto focus that bother me more, the AF assistant illuminator not seems to be constant, am i the problem or is it the camera?

  • mort sela

    i am using nikon products from the time of film nikkormat ,now with d90 never had a problem but now the question is how a company like nikon releases a camera that is soo good and also so bad,the company has to voluntarily recall all problematic cameras and fix them , it is a bad reputation that can cause many photographers to move away from nikon cameras

  • Manuel Perez

    The d7000 , when it came out was hampered by dust and oil problems , not to mention focusing problems . After a few months the problems seem to have been corrected as the complaining subsided to an occasional grunt . About 7 months after it came out M bought one. It has work perfectly . I have 3 Nikon cameras , D300 , D7000 and the great Nikon film camera , F- 100 . Neither have given me , not even a hiccup and all have worked as intended . Lesson learn , don’t buy as soon as they are introduced . Can Nikon be justified ? Nope . But being a DSLR a complicated instrument problems do come out that are resolved latter down the line .

  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/flowers-of-the-sea/ Eric

    Dust and spots on the sensor are a fact of life, if you ever use your camera. A spot here and there is part of the joys of photography. If it ever shows up in your shot, use the healing brush and/or clone stamp tool to remove it in photoshop.

    No camera, regardless of manufacturer is immune from sensor dust, and they can get spots from day 1. So it is rather difficult to blame the manufacturer, because you can get dust on the sensor as soon as you pop the cap off to put a lens on.

    I have NEVER seen a camera without a bit of sensor dust. So stop griping about something you can’t control, and get out there to take more pictures :)

  • Peter Williams

    Sorry Eric I am not griping. I thought the purpose of this forum was to help each other – it does’nt seem to be the case. I referred in an earlier post about a UK publisher. In fairness to that publisher in the Jan issue, the editor has commented on a letter regarding this issue and admitted that they found (while in time lapse mode) the same area as the images above ” littered with faint spots” on their test D600. N Photo the magazine involved say they are monitoring the situation but at the time of going to print there was no official announcement from Nikon on this.
    This is my final comment on this matter – I am now going to enjoy my fantastic D800. Hope I helped somebody out there.
    Happy Christmas

  • http://na Richard Evans

    I’ve owned D60, several D90s, D700 and await delivery of my D600. The only issue I’ve ever had with any of these were the dust spots with the D700; however, with one trip to the camera store and a professional sensor cleaning, the camera is perfect. Dust on the sensor, while annoying, is really a simple problem with a simple solution.

  • Terry pinfold

    Liked the review and thought the background history gave good context

  • John K

    I’m with Peter on this one. How can he not even bring it up when it is so obviously showing up on the iso shots and making them look terrible? Since no one will address it, I am not comfortable buying this camera, maybe ever…

    People saying the “problem” goes away after a few shots are really just saying the oil/debris goes away. There is still something funky about that mirror box, which wouldn’t make me feel awesome after dropping a several thousand on a body and lenses

  • John K

    I also failed to see where the reviewer explained how this camera was acquired. Was it sent by the company for reviewing purposes? Did he purchase it?

    PS @Eric: I don’t think you fully understand the issue Peter Williams is talking about. It is not merely that the sensor happened to get dusty.

  • http://www.spectrakitchens.carbonemade.com Edgard Vermeulen

    Hi. Got my D600 for 2weeks…great camera but the SPOTS..After 2 weeks of use with the same lens a lot of dusk
    appeared…Took a hdr to show it more clearly.
    O…. Nikon RSA said that they will clean it for 200 euros,and i must pay the post fees.???
    Sorry cant load my foto,got no idea what a image URL is..helpwe are 3rd world

  • Karen

    I tried and returned two of them because of the multiplying oil splatter spots (even without a lens change). Yeah, I know, as Eric says, that sensor spots are a part of dSLR life — but not to that extreme. And paying out $2K for a camera and being expected to have it wet cleaned a few times, or wait 3000 or 10,000 shutter clicks, for it to go away isn’t acceptable. I really hope Nikon gets this straightened out and makes whatever change they need to make, because except for this issue, it was an awesome camera.

  • Paul

    The main issue for me with the D600 is the dense AF points – they need to be more spread apart and there needs to be some focus points near the edges of the frames. Looks like there will still be use for my 7D and potentially the 5D Mark III in a year or two when the price really drops.

  • Pete

    I have to admit to never having been a fan of Nikon cameras, not for any good reason, just the way the menu’s worked, and the perverse way the lens comes off. Perhaps just the same reason I’ve always used macs rather than windows.
    However having been a long time Olympus user from the OM2 onwards through three compact digitals and three DSLR’s, I decided that for me, the 4/3 format was dead in the water, and decided to go full frame, the D600 being the camera of choice, it seemed to tick all the boxes.
    I was just about to buy one on Amazon when I started to read the reports of dust and oil spots, and when people I knew who had bought them experienced the problem, I’ve reluctantly put my purchase on hold.
    However, I have been amazed to read the defence of this by camera users who postulate that it’s a “fact of life with a DSLR” Not with an Olympus DSLR it isn’t! I’ve never cleaned the sensors on any of mine, and the two I still have are spotless after many thousands of shutter actuations and hundreds of lens changes. I’m really beginning to wish that I’d not sold my (superb) Olympus lenses, and just bought an E5.
    I would really love to get a D600, but who in their right mind spends £1500 on piece of camera equipment with a known fault like this? With “brand new” used ones selling on ebay for £1100 there are unhappy bunnies out there!

    It wouldn’t be so bad if Nikon would put their hands up and admit the fault, but by not doing so, there must be many people such as myself who want to make the jump to full frame who will never make the change to Nikon, and become Sony or Canon users.
    Let’s hope that after six months or so, new cameras being sold don’t suffer from this apparently to Nikon “non existent” problem, and we’ll all be happy.

  • http://www.jufarhad.tumblr.com ju farhad

    nikon d600 is good its iso up to12000 and some function are like canon eos 5d mark 2

  • rl

    I got this camera despite the reports about the spots, thinking it may be a minority of cameras. Unfortuantely I got spots on mine too. That in itself does not bother me. What has bothered me greatly is the way Nikon is responding to *my* problem. I posted a few photos here:
    http://rlahiri.posterous.com/how-to-lose-customer-loyalty-lesson-from-niko#!/
    Please ignore the diatribe before the pictures, but I will say that Nikon has lost a loyal fan in the process.

  • Paul

    Hey RL,

    OMG, those aren’t dust spots, you’ve captured three UFOs!!!!! :-)

    In seriousness, at this grade of camera, such spots are unacceptable. Admittedly if you had not drawn arrows to indicate their location, I would not have noticed. But again, at this grade of camera, there should be no such issues.

    Rgds

    Paul

  • Chetan K Jain

    What about the (in)famous green tinge which many users have reported? I almost got this one, but now waiting if Nikon will patch it in the next firmware fix … any users experience this? observations??

  • Pete

    Sorry Nikon, can’t wait for you to fix this, or answer my email asking for reassurance, just bought a 6D, the start of a new system! ………How much more business will they loose before acknowledging and fixing this problem.

  • Joven

    Congrats, I hear the 6D is a great camera. The question is why you felt the need to come and tell everyone about your purchase? Maybe I shoot wide open too frequently, or maybe I just don’t shoot in enough bright areas to see issues with dust/oil, and I’ve had 16×20 made already.

  • Joven

    Chetan, The camera does have an odd white balance out of the box, but nothing that can’t be corrected in the camera settings, at least for me (fine tune the WB to M1 on the color temp chart).

  • Robin Gobi

    I have this Camera . I had two service for oil dots in the sensor But i still have the problem. Nikon have been Doing big mistake to Nikon fans.

    I’m very disappointed with Nikon‘s D600. So many D600 owners dot oil dots issues even two thousands Sutter count. The local dealers are not well responsible.

    Why don’t Nikon replace the camera or refund the money? I’m Waiting Nikon what’ll do for these issues in D600??!

Some older comments

  • Joven

    January 18, 2013 12:55 pm

    Chetan, The camera does have an odd white balance out of the box, but nothing that can't be corrected in the camera settings, at least for me (fine tune the WB to M1 on the color temp chart).

  • Joven

    January 18, 2013 12:49 pm

    Congrats, I hear the 6D is a great camera. The question is why you felt the need to come and tell everyone about your purchase? Maybe I shoot wide open too frequently, or maybe I just don't shoot in enough bright areas to see issues with dust/oil, and I've had 16x20 made already.

  • Pete

    January 18, 2013 06:30 am

    Sorry Nikon, can't wait for you to fix this, or answer my email asking for reassurance, just bought a 6D, the start of a new system! .........How much more business will they loose before acknowledging and fixing this problem.

  • Chetan K Jain

    January 17, 2013 02:19 am

    What about the (in)famous green tinge which many users have reported? I almost got this one, but now waiting if Nikon will patch it in the next firmware fix ... any users experience this? observations??

  • Paul

    January 14, 2013 07:54 pm

    Hey RL,

    OMG, those aren't dust spots, you've captured three UFOs!!!!! :-)

    In seriousness, at this grade of camera, such spots are unacceptable. Admittedly if you had not drawn arrows to indicate their location, I would not have noticed. But again, at this grade of camera, there should be no such issues.

    Rgds

    Paul

  • rl

    January 14, 2013 06:44 am

    I got this camera despite the reports about the spots, thinking it may be a minority of cameras. Unfortuantely I got spots on mine too. That in itself does not bother me. What has bothered me greatly is the way Nikon is responding to *my* problem. I posted a few photos here:
    http://rlahiri.posterous.com/how-to-lose-customer-loyalty-lesson-from-niko#!/
    Please ignore the diatribe before the pictures, but I will say that Nikon has lost a loyal fan in the process.

  • ju farhad

    January 3, 2013 01:10 am

    nikon d600 is good its iso up to12000 and some function are like canon eos 5d mark 2

  • Pete

    January 2, 2013 09:40 am

    I have to admit to never having been a fan of Nikon cameras, not for any good reason, just the way the menu's worked, and the perverse way the lens comes off. Perhaps just the same reason I've always used macs rather than windows.
    However having been a long time Olympus user from the OM2 onwards through three compact digitals and three DSLR's, I decided that for me, the 4/3 format was dead in the water, and decided to go full frame, the D600 being the camera of choice, it seemed to tick all the boxes.
    I was just about to buy one on Amazon when I started to read the reports of dust and oil spots, and when people I knew who had bought them experienced the problem, I've reluctantly put my purchase on hold.
    However, I have been amazed to read the defence of this by camera users who postulate that it's a "fact of life with a DSLR" Not with an Olympus DSLR it isn't! I've never cleaned the sensors on any of mine, and the two I still have are spotless after many thousands of shutter actuations and hundreds of lens changes. I'm really beginning to wish that I'd not sold my (superb) Olympus lenses, and just bought an E5.
    I would really love to get a D600, but who in their right mind spends £1500 on piece of camera equipment with a known fault like this? With "brand new" used ones selling on ebay for £1100 there are unhappy bunnies out there!

    It wouldn't be so bad if Nikon would put their hands up and admit the fault, but by not doing so, there must be many people such as myself who want to make the jump to full frame who will never make the change to Nikon, and become Sony or Canon users.
    Let's hope that after six months or so, new cameras being sold don't suffer from this apparently to Nikon "non existent" problem, and we'll all be happy.

  • Paul

    December 31, 2012 05:51 pm

    The main issue for me with the D600 is the dense AF points - they need to be more spread apart and there needs to be some focus points near the edges of the frames. Looks like there will still be use for my 7D and potentially the 5D Mark III in a year or two when the price really drops.

  • Karen

    December 30, 2012 04:21 am

    I tried and returned two of them because of the multiplying oil splatter spots (even without a lens change). Yeah, I know, as Eric says, that sensor spots are a part of dSLR life -- but not to that extreme. And paying out $2K for a camera and being expected to have it wet cleaned a few times, or wait 3000 or 10,000 shutter clicks, for it to go away isn't acceptable. I really hope Nikon gets this straightened out and makes whatever change they need to make, because except for this issue, it was an awesome camera.

  • Edgard Vermeulen

    December 29, 2012 04:51 am

    Hi. Got my D600 for 2weeks...great camera but the SPOTS..After 2 weeks of use with the same lens a lot of dusk
    appeared...Took a hdr to show it more clearly.
    O.... Nikon RSA said that they will clean it for 200 euros,and i must pay the post fees.???
    Sorry cant load my foto,got no idea what a image URL is..helpwe are 3rd world

  • John K

    December 28, 2012 10:46 pm

    I also failed to see where the reviewer explained how this camera was acquired. Was it sent by the company for reviewing purposes? Did he purchase it?

    PS @Eric: I don't think you fully understand the issue Peter Williams is talking about. It is not merely that the sensor happened to get dusty.

  • John K

    December 28, 2012 10:35 pm

    I'm with Peter on this one. How can he not even bring it up when it is so obviously showing up on the iso shots and making them look terrible? Since no one will address it, I am not comfortable buying this camera, maybe ever...

    People saying the "problem" goes away after a few shots are really just saying the oil/debris goes away. There is still something funky about that mirror box, which wouldn't make me feel awesome after dropping a several thousand on a body and lenses

  • Terry pinfold

    December 28, 2012 08:23 pm

    Liked the review and thought the background history gave good context

  • Richard Evans

    December 26, 2012 04:33 am

    I've owned D60, several D90s, D700 and await delivery of my D600. The only issue I've ever had with any of these were the dust spots with the D700; however, with one trip to the camera store and a professional sensor cleaning, the camera is perfect. Dust on the sensor, while annoying, is really a simple problem with a simple solution.

  • Peter Williams

    December 22, 2012 10:29 am

    Sorry Eric I am not griping. I thought the purpose of this forum was to help each other - it does'nt seem to be the case. I referred in an earlier post about a UK publisher. In fairness to that publisher in the Jan issue, the editor has commented on a letter regarding this issue and admitted that they found (while in time lapse mode) the same area as the images above " littered with faint spots" on their test D600. N Photo the magazine involved say they are monitoring the situation but at the time of going to print there was no official announcement from Nikon on this.
    This is my final comment on this matter - I am now going to enjoy my fantastic D800. Hope I helped somebody out there.
    Happy Christmas

  • Eric

    December 22, 2012 05:13 am

    Dust and spots on the sensor are a fact of life, if you ever use your camera. A spot here and there is part of the joys of photography. If it ever shows up in your shot, use the healing brush and/or clone stamp tool to remove it in photoshop.

    No camera, regardless of manufacturer is immune from sensor dust, and they can get spots from day 1. So it is rather difficult to blame the manufacturer, because you can get dust on the sensor as soon as you pop the cap off to put a lens on.

    I have NEVER seen a camera without a bit of sensor dust. So stop griping about something you can't control, and get out there to take more pictures :)

  • Manuel Perez

    December 21, 2012 04:33 pm

    The d7000 , when it came out was hampered by dust and oil problems , not to mention focusing problems . After a few months the problems seem to have been corrected as the complaining subsided to an occasional grunt . About 7 months after it came out M bought one. It has work perfectly . I have 3 Nikon cameras , D300 , D7000 and the great Nikon film camera , F- 100 . Neither have given me , not even a hiccup and all have worked as intended . Lesson learn , don't buy as soon as they are introduced . Can Nikon be justified ? Nope . But being a DSLR a complicated instrument problems do come out that are resolved latter down the line .

  • mort sela

    December 21, 2012 03:49 pm

    i am using nikon products from the time of film nikkormat ,now with d90 never had a problem but now the question is how a company like nikon releases a camera that is soo good and also so bad,the company has to voluntarily recall all problematic cameras and fix them , it is a bad reputation that can cause many photographers to move away from nikon cameras

  • Yves Jardon

    December 21, 2012 02:50 pm

    From the D70 I change to the D90 and now to the D600 with the 24-70 f2.8 lens, and the differences are amazing, D600 is fast and sharp, low noise in high iso, my way to take photos change a lot with more liberty mainly in the control of the depth of field. Yes I had problems of dust, easily remove from the sensor as Ceri Vale says. Some other problems in low light with the auto focus that bother me more, the AF assistant illuminator not seems to be constant, am i the problem or is it the camera?

  • Peter Williams

    December 21, 2012 10:57 am

    My original point was that when you spend 2299 euro on a new camera from a world leader such as Nikon, you expect the quality to be perfect. This was not my experience and others also have found this not to be the case.
    If some people are happy to use photoshop to remove Nikon's mess that is fine for them. If you think buying a rocket blower is the solution go ahead - ask Santa for one with your new "quality D600". If you really want to see worse try using HDR - it spurts dozens of black oil specs over the image.
    My issue is I DID NOT GET WHAT I PAID FOR .

    I agree the D600 is an excellent camera producing high quality images with some nice features apart from the dust and oil. I am sure there are some D600's that have no issue - I had two of them and did'nt want a third.
    I have been a Nikon user for many years having started with a Nikon FM2 moving to a D40 and then to the D90, So I dont take any enjoyment out of being critical regarding Nikon's quality control. All I want is that reviewers tell the truth and do not mislead people into purchasing something that is effectively faulty.
    I dont think that Canon, Sony or any camera manufacturer in the world would be proud of the pictures above representing a new "perfect" product.
    Despite my D600 issues I remain loyal to Nikon's technology. I have recently purchased the D800 and am perfectly happy with it. I am sorry but I have no faith in the D600 nor ever will.

    I am surprised that I have had no response from the author of the review, DPS or NIKON.
    I THINK THE REALITY IS THAT NOBODY CARES AND ITS ALL ABOUT SALES NOT QUALITY OR THE CUSTOMER BEING HAPPY.

  • Peter Gowdy

    December 21, 2012 12:24 am

    You call this a review? Check Thom Hogan for a real review:
    http://www.bythom.com/d600.htm

  • Ceri Vale

    December 20, 2012 07:08 pm

    @Peter Williams

    I really am bored reading about dust/oil problems. Yes, they've over-oiled some moving parts and yes, there's excessive dust. I clean the sensor regularly...ergo, I have no problems.

    The machine is a joy to use

  • anthony

    December 20, 2012 01:57 pm

    There is a long discussion about dust and Manu use a rocket blower to get rid of the dust....don't let that issue judge your buying choice of this camera.....I bought mine 2 weeks ago with a Nikkor 50mm f/1.4 and its a huge upgrade from the D5000.....takes really sharp pictures and wonderful low light

  • Joven

    December 20, 2012 11:16 am

    correction to previous post:

    the spots HAVEN'T been as big of an issue*

  • Joven

    December 20, 2012 11:15 am

    @ Peter

    Should the reviewer stone the D600 now when 1) the issue seems to disappear after 1000 shots? What if the issue is resolved in the next month - does that mean the sensor is any less impressive? I have a D600 and spots have been as big of an issue for me as others (over 1,500 shots in), and to be honest, I haven't been changing my lenses in perfect conditions.

    I'll clean my sensor around 3K shots and will do so from here on out. It's like owning a car and being pissed you have to change the tires. Yeah, the original tires aren't as great as they should have been, and it'll piss you off, but once you get it squared away, you're left with a great car. The images and experiences I've had with this camera don't make me miss my D5100.

  • Joe Elliott

    December 20, 2012 09:15 am

    I really have been thinking a lot about a camera upgrade the D5100 i have outgrown and the noise at high ISOs can be a nuisance might have a go at this one, thanks for your review...

  • Girish

    December 20, 2012 08:08 am

    Doesnt that Orange ever rot? It has been seen in all the reviews on his site :-)

  • Bob

    December 20, 2012 05:07 am

    Mine, too has spots/smudges on the sensor, very annoying but fixable in Photoshop. Does anyone know if/how Nikon is resolving this issue?

  • Penelope

    December 20, 2012 01:28 am

    Mine had spots on the sensor…the quality control on this one seems to be a problem for many :(

  • Peter Williams

    December 20, 2012 01:19 am

    Actually if you look at the the ISO images in your article you will see the famous dust spots on every image. Dont see you commenting on this in your article. Now the whole world can see what I am talking about. On both my D600'S the spots was appeared in the left hand to middle side of the image as in yours above. Is this the new standard of Nikon ?

  • Peter Williams

    December 20, 2012 01:10 am

    I am fed up reading these glowing reports about the Nikon D600. They do not mention the problem of dust spots and excess oil dots appearing on images after, in my case, the first 100 images taken. I have had two D600's both with the same issue. Eventually Nikon UK admitted that there was a problem with the sensor which has been much talked about on forums worldwide. How do reviewers never see or mention these issues. Sometimes I wonder how independent these reviews really are.
    Nikon now say that the issue disappears after the first 3000 activations. Is this the new quality standard of Nikon.?
    I reported the problem to one of the UK's Nikon users publications. They acknowledged the problem in my first e mail but when I suggested the print a comment in their next publication highlighting the issue they did not reply. So much for the independent publisher.

  • Ceri Vale

    December 19, 2012 09:18 pm

    To George Osbourne (? really)

    Although I've yet to try any HDR work, I would say the camera's dynamic range is SO impressive 3 bracketed shots will wholly serve your purpose. The amount of highlight and shadow recovery that's possible is nothing short of astounding.

  • George Osborne

    December 19, 2012 07:04 pm

    Easy to follow review. The major downside for me is the lack of bracketing range only 3, if you need to do HDR or blending in Photoshop with large light contrast it is a non starter. I would have added the camera to my D300S but for this reason.

  • Barrie Smith

    December 19, 2012 11:16 am

    To Teri:
    this is for those who have come into digital photography late and explains why we have many cameras with small sensors and others (and more expensive!) with larger sensors. And the benefits of larger sensors.
    Not everyone has the benefit of a photographic experience and faced the negatives of tiny film frames!
    He who ignores history …

  • Manoaboy808

    December 19, 2012 10:48 am

    I can see that sensor smudge problem in your high iso shot. but do not fear, it goes away. you just have to clean it once or twice after the first couple thousand shots.

  • Teri

    December 19, 2012 10:46 am

    What's with the random introduction to the demise of film photography and then veering off into the review? Was interesting enough (I haven't looked into it at all) but seemed pretty out of place with the review. I would have preferred to see that part removed (or maybe moved to a different article) and having more "reviewing" going on - maybe comparing the D600 to other cameras that people might be moving up from in terms of handling/performance.

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