New Lexar Professional USB 3.0 Dual-Slot Reader Dramatically Accelerates Digital Workflow - Digital Photography School

New Lexar Professional USB 3.0 Dual-Slot Reader Dramatically Accelerates Digital Workflow

How Fast do you want to go, today?

New products are coming out every day. Faster cameras, faster memory cards, faster computers… What is the slowest, most time consuming part of your photography workflow? Please let me know in the comments section of this post from Lexar…

Press Release Starts Here.

Fremont, CA, May 19, 2011 – Lexar Media, a leading global provider of memory products for digital media, today announced the new Lexar® Professional USB 3.0 Dual-Slot Reader, a high-performance card reader that enables professional and advanced amateur photographers and videographers to maximize their workflow with blazing-fast transfer speeds. The reader leverages SuperSpeed USB (USB 3.0)http://www.usb.org/developers/ssusb technology to deliver high-speed performance that supports the latest CompactFlash® (CF) UDMA, Secure Digital Extended Capacity™ (SDXC)**, and SD Ultra High Speed-I (UHS-I) memory cards. The versatile reader is also backwards compatible with standard CF, SD™, and Secure Digital High Capacity™ (SDHC) memory cards and USB 2.0 host devices. For additional information about the Lexar Professional USB 3.0 Dual-Slot Reader, visit www.lexar.comhttp://www.lexar.com

“USB is the most popular connectivity option for PCs, and it’s critical that professional photographers and videographers have convenient and versatile tools to maximize their workflow and fully leverage the performance of their high-speed memory cards,” said Manisha Sharma, director of product marketing for cards, Lexar Media. “The Lexar Professional USB 3.0 Dual-Slot Reader combines extremely fast performance with a versatile, innovative design to provide pro and hobbyist shooters with a reader that dramatically reduces image transfer time. The speed offered by the reader enables users to move large volumes of high-resolution images and HD video faster than ever, allowing them to spend less time at the PC and more time on other activities.”

The Lexar Professional USB 3.0 Dual-Slot Reader features the new SuperSpeed USB 3.0 interface, which operates at 500MB per second; while the Hi-Speed USB 2.0 interface operates at 60MB per second*. The Lexar Professional USB 3.0 Dual-Slot Reader takes advantage of the performance of high-speed cards. Real-world tests prove that today’s high-performance cards can be read more than six times faster with the Lexar Professional USB 3.0 Dual-Slot Reader than with previous generation USB 2.0 card readers, and future high-performance cards are likely to enable an even faster data transfer experience. The reader can transfer content from both SD and CF cards simultaneously, and allows for easy file transfer from one card to another. The USB 3.0 Dual-Slot Reader also features an innovative, pop-up mechanism that lets users close the reader when not in use, protecting it from dirt and debris. Its compact, portable design means users can take it on the go, and its smooth contours help it slip easily in and out of a photo bag or briefcase.

The Lexar Professional USB 3.0 Dual-Slot Reader provides consumers with the quality and reliability they have come to expect from Lexar Media. All Lexar product designs are tested in the Lexar Quality Labs, a group of facilities where all Lexar product designs undergo extensive testing to ensure performance, quality, compatibility, and reliability with more than 800 intended digital devices.

The Lexar Professional USB 3.0 Dual-Slot Reader comes with free, dedicated customer support and a five-year limited warranty. The reader is available now for purchase on www.lexar.comhttp://www.lexar.com, and will be available from leading photo retailers in June, with an MSRP of $49.99

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Sime is the community manager of the dPS Forums and lead blogger in our Cameras and Gear Blog. He's a Melbourne based photographer, www.gtvone.com and please feel free to follow him on Twitter

  • http://www.2pi.info John

    The slowest part for me is getting out and taking good pictures.

    Fast card readers are good, but normal desktop hard drives max out at around 100MB/s sustained transfer, so that will be the limit anyhow if just copying from the card to disk.

  • Nicki Rakitti

    I think to make use of the 3.0 capability, you would either need a new cable and new host adapter or have a motherboard that supports USB 3.0. Personally, my bottleneck happens with slow internet service when trying to upload multiple pictures to my blog, online editor or storage site. Sometimes, my provider’s idea of high-speed feels like a 128mb dial-up modem.

  • http://www.tomaszworek.com/ Tomasz Worek

    “(…) Dramatically Accelerates Digital Workflow”

    Please… no jokes here…. do we really need this? I don’t think so – I recommend to change shooting style instead and don’t use “spray & pray” method.

  • Peter

    I upgraded my motherboard to USB3 when it came on the market. Then I sat back and waited and waited for a USB3 card reader to come onto the market, and at last it’s here, a bit expensive, but then it’s the first so what can you expect.
    I didn’t realise at first that you had to have newer type cards to gain the extra speed, so I googled SD Ultra High Speed-I (UHS-I) memory cards mainly to see how much they cost. I couldn’t find one anywhere, even on Lexar website.
    I then looked up CompactFlash® (CF) UDMA, nothing, but I did notice the prices of their faster cards $230 for 16gb, and it makes me wonder just how much these new cards are going to cost.

  • http://blog.myfotolife.com Leonidas

    nice, i want one

  • http://www.andyphoto.co.uk Andy Mills

    I gave up reading as soon as the word “leverage” popped up. Maybe if I was playing a game of buzzword bingo (I won’t say here what its proper name is) I could continue…

    It can take a while to grab your photos off a card or three, but unless you are one of those that “spray and pray” it shouldn’t be the longest part of your workflow.

    There are also other things to do while the photos transfer (like check emails, making a cup of tea, walking the dog, saving the world), so you don’t have to be sat at your computer twiddling your thumbs while you wait for photos to be transferred.

    And finally, the extra speed of this reader is of no use unless you have a USB 3.0 interface on your computer, which most of us won’t as it’s a fairly recent thing. It would mean opening up your computer and adding a (probably cheap, to be fair) adaptor card – assuming you have a free PCI/PCI-e (or similar) slot available.

  • http://dsdphotography.co.za Dewan Demmer

    I need a new card reader and I happen to have a motherboard that is USB 3.0 capable …. sooo maybe.

  • http://lucascornwell.com Luke

    For anyone who shoots video with an HD-DSLR, does long shoots like wedding or all day commercial sessions…this will be a must! Nothing like getting back to the office and having to transfer 32-64GB over to your machine at 20MBps. With this, it should be at least twice that depending on your card speeds.

  • http://www.bvcphoto.com B

    So not only do ads pop up on the site, but now entire blog posts are ads.

    How much did Lexar pay for this post?

  • http://www.dfindlay.zenfolio.com David

    Phone ringing and music too loud while he was doing his pitch – I’m not sure even he thinks this is a must-have gadget.

  • Jake Townsen

    No doubt this is geared for video professionals and event photog’s that shoot high capacity cards and fill them up. Transferring 64 gig cards can take awhile.

  • http://www.andyphoto.co.uk Andy Mills

    @B

    I did have the pop up, but I did something and I no longer get it. There may be a chance that your computer security software or something is blocking cookies, or the browser, or something,

    Anyway, for someone who goes out in the field with their laptop (with USB 3.0 interface), and has a high MP camera and needs the speed, then this could be a good item to have. But I do think that at $50, it is priced a bit high at the moment, considering that you can get USB 2.0 readers with more card slots (differing types) for less than £15.

    If I were to go out in to the “field” frequently, then I might get this due to its ability to close itself and keep rubbish out when not in use.

  • http://nickerwin.com Nick

    This looks pretty sweet though. I been looking for a new card reader and this might just do the job just fine and I don’t have to worry about getting one for a long time because it has USB 3.0. I might pick one up sometime later this year.. or if there is another one that comes out that is a little bit better. Only time will tell.

  • http://lapagliaphoto.com Scott LaPaglia

    My Mac has a built in card read, not sure what bus it sits on but its fast. I’m more in agreement that you pop in a card, start the transfer, go grab drink. Pop in the next card and check your email lol. Even in the field its not that bad. Finish a card, swap out, and start transferring, but if you need to do that that often get more cards IMHO.

  • Alex Karl

    It’s the perfect tool to gain time when you pre-work your data onlocation or you have a lot of data to load up at home (VDSLR).

    But you need USB 3.0 AND a SSD to load up. Without that it makes no sense.

  • http://www.glamourphotography.co Yucel

    Yeah, My PC only has USB 2.0 and has a card reader, and even some of the faster memory cards can only work in cameras so fast.

    The Delkin UHS-1 Cards work no faster in a Nikon D7000 than a SanDisk UHS-1, which is rated 1/2 the speed and is currently half the price.

    I suspect is due to bus speed limitations of the D7000….

    See my testing of cards, if you like, at http://glamourphotography.co/?p=2552 and perhaps save yourself a few bucks. (UHS-1 cards do work better than Class 6 and 10s in the Nikon, just not any better than each other…)

Some older comments

  • Yucel

    June 13, 2011 10:45 am

    Yeah, My PC only has USB 2.0 and has a card reader, and even some of the faster memory cards can only work in cameras so fast.

    The Delkin UHS-1 Cards work no faster in a Nikon D7000 than a SanDisk UHS-1, which is rated 1/2 the speed and is currently half the price.

    I suspect is due to bus speed limitations of the D7000....

    See my testing of cards, if you like, at http://glamourphotography.co/?p=2552 and perhaps save yourself a few bucks. (UHS-1 cards do work better than Class 6 and 10s in the Nikon, just not any better than each other...)

  • Alex Karl

    May 26, 2011 08:10 am

    It's the perfect tool to gain time when you pre-work your data onlocation or you have a lot of data to load up at home (VDSLR).

    But you need USB 3.0 AND a SSD to load up. Without that it makes no sense.

  • Scott LaPaglia

    May 25, 2011 06:11 pm

    My Mac has a built in card read, not sure what bus it sits on but its fast. I'm more in agreement that you pop in a card, start the transfer, go grab drink. Pop in the next card and check your email lol. Even in the field its not that bad. Finish a card, swap out, and start transferring, but if you need to do that that often get more cards IMHO.

  • Nick

    May 25, 2011 12:48 pm

    This looks pretty sweet though. I been looking for a new card reader and this might just do the job just fine and I don't have to worry about getting one for a long time because it has USB 3.0. I might pick one up sometime later this year.. or if there is another one that comes out that is a little bit better. Only time will tell.

  • Andy Mills

    May 25, 2011 04:44 am

    @B

    I did have the pop up, but I did something and I no longer get it. There may be a chance that your computer security software or something is blocking cookies, or the browser, or something,

    ---

    Anyway, for someone who goes out in the field with their laptop (with USB 3.0 interface), and has a high MP camera and needs the speed, then this could be a good item to have. But I do think that at $50, it is priced a bit high at the moment, considering that you can get USB 2.0 readers with more card slots (differing types) for less than £15.

    If I were to go out in to the "field" frequently, then I might get this due to its ability to close itself and keep rubbish out when not in use.

  • Jake Townsen

    May 25, 2011 03:46 am

    No doubt this is geared for video professionals and event photog's that shoot high capacity cards and fill them up. Transferring 64 gig cards can take awhile.

  • David

    May 25, 2011 03:41 am

    Phone ringing and music too loud while he was doing his pitch - I'm not sure even he thinks this is a must-have gadget.

  • B

    May 25, 2011 03:39 am

    So not only do ads pop up on the site, but now entire blog posts are ads.

    How much did Lexar pay for this post?

  • Luke

    May 25, 2011 12:04 am

    For anyone who shoots video with an HD-DSLR, does long shoots like wedding or all day commercial sessions...this will be a must! Nothing like getting back to the office and having to transfer 32-64GB over to your machine at 20MBps. With this, it should be at least twice that depending on your card speeds.

  • Dewan Demmer

    May 24, 2011 11:31 pm

    I need a new card reader and I happen to have a motherboard that is USB 3.0 capable .... sooo maybe.

  • Andy Mills

    May 24, 2011 10:35 pm

    I gave up reading as soon as the word "leverage" popped up. Maybe if I was playing a game of buzzword bingo (I won't say here what its proper name is) I could continue...

    It can take a while to grab your photos off a card or three, but unless you are one of those that "spray and pray" it shouldn't be the longest part of your workflow.

    There are also other things to do while the photos transfer (like check emails, making a cup of tea, walking the dog, saving the world), so you don't have to be sat at your computer twiddling your thumbs while you wait for photos to be transferred.

    And finally, the extra speed of this reader is of no use unless you have a USB 3.0 interface on your computer, which most of us won't as it's a fairly recent thing. It would mean opening up your computer and adding a (probably cheap, to be fair) adaptor card - assuming you have a free PCI/PCI-e (or similar) slot available.

  • Leonidas

    May 24, 2011 10:09 pm

    nice, i want one

  • Peter

    May 24, 2011 07:20 pm

    I upgraded my motherboard to USB3 when it came on the market. Then I sat back and waited and waited for a USB3 card reader to come onto the market, and at last it's here, a bit expensive, but then it's the first so what can you expect.
    I didn't realise at first that you had to have newer type cards to gain the extra speed, so I googled SD Ultra High Speed-I (UHS-I) memory cards mainly to see how much they cost. I couldn't find one anywhere, even on Lexar website.
    I then looked up CompactFlash® (CF) UDMA, nothing, but I did notice the prices of their faster cards $230 for 16gb, and it makes me wonder just how much these new cards are going to cost.

  • Tomasz Worek

    May 24, 2011 05:26 pm

    "(...) Dramatically Accelerates Digital Workflow"

    Please... no jokes here.... do we really need this? I don't think so - I recommend to change shooting style instead and don't use "spray & pray" method.

  • Nicki Rakitti

    May 24, 2011 03:28 pm

    I think to make use of the 3.0 capability, you would either need a new cable and new host adapter or have a motherboard that supports USB 3.0. Personally, my bottleneck happens with slow internet service when trying to upload multiple pictures to my blog, online editor or storage site. Sometimes, my provider's idea of high-speed feels like a 128mb dial-up modem.

  • John

    May 24, 2011 03:20 pm

    The slowest part for me is getting out and taking good pictures.

    Fast card readers are good, but normal desktop hard drives max out at around 100MB/s sustained transfer, so that will be the limit anyhow if just copying from the card to disk.

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