Mastering Monochrome Mode - Digital Photography School

Mastering Monochrome Mode

Mastering monochrome mode

Andrew S. Gibson is the author of Mastering Photography: A Beginner’s Guide to Using Digital Cameras.

One of the benefits of digital photography that I really appreciate is the ease with which I can convert images to black and white. It was much harder back when I first became interested in photography. I remember wanting to try black and white, and print images in a darkroom, but living in a property with no spare space to build a darkroom meant that it was years before I was able to start learning to print.

Now, black and white is as accessible as switching to your camera’s monochrome mode. Some people still prefer chemical processes, but for the rest of us it means no more darkrooms and no more waiting to process film and make prints. The process is instant. That has opened up black and white photography to many more photographers, which can only be a good thing.

Use Raw

I want to make one thing clear before continuing. You will always get the best results in black and white by using the Raw format and converting your files to black in white in software like Photoshop, Lightroom or a plug-in like Silver Efex Pro 2. But there are still good reasons to switch your camera to monochrome mode for shooting in black and white. Let’s take a look at what they are.

Monochrome mode helps you visualise in black and white.

Mastering monochrome mode

Seeing in black and white is an acquired skill. It takes time to learn how scenes that you are accustomed to viewing in colour translate to black and white.

The benefit of switching to monochrome mode is that the camera displays your photos in black and white on the LCD screen. This helps you see how the scene looks in monochrome.

You can take it further by increasing the contrast or changing the colour filter settings (I’ll cover this below if you don’t know how to do this or why).

The photo above is an example. The colour version is what I would see on my camera’s screen if I set the Picture Style to Landscape. Underneath that is what I would see in monochrome mode.

Monochrome mode helps you take better colour photos.

Mastering monochrome mode

Years ago I read an interview with David Muench in which he described his style as ‘black and white photography in colour’. That statement has always stuck with me.

What did he mean by that? Well, the basis of a good black and white image is tonal contrast – the way that light and dark tones are arranged within the composition.

David Muench’s colour photos rely as much on tonal contrast as they would if he were shooting in black and white. Tones are an important building block in the composition of his images even though he is shooting in colour.

That idea has become the basis of much of my colour photography. I believe that strong colour photography utilises tonal contrast as much as good black and white. That’s why using monochrome mode, and learning to see in black and white will make you a stronger photographer in colour too.

The photo above is a good example of tonal contrast. The two images show how it would look on my camera’s screen in both standard and monochrome Picture Styles. I increased contrast in the monochrome Picture Style as the light was so flat.

Monochrome mode helps you take better black and white portraits

Mastering monochrome mode

I find that models love to see their photos on the camera’s LCD screen during a shoot. If you want to work in black and white, switching to monochrome mode and showing your model the previews in black and white helps them get an idea of how the processed images will come out. If your model gets excited about the results he or she will work harder to create good images.

The example here shows the difference between portrait and monochrome Picture Styles (contrast increased in monochrome mode).

Monochrome mode – what you need to know

Every manufacturer approaches this differently, so check your manual, but the basic idea is the same.

These are the settings you are looking for, by manufacturer:

Canon: Picture Style
Nikon: Picture Control
Sony: Creative Style
Pentax: Custom Image
Olympus: Picture Mode
Sigma: Colour Mode
Fujifilm: Film Simulation

Look for the setting labelled Monochrome (or something similar). Once selected, you should also be able to customise it. My Canon EOS cameras have four parameters you can adjust in Monochrome mode:

Mastering monochrome mode

Sharpness

Ignore this if you’re shooting in Raw, as you can adjust sharpness when processing the image. If you’re using JPEG, be careful not to oversharpen – you can increase sharpness in Photoshop if you need to.

Contrast

The biggest concern many photographers have about using monochrome mode is that the photos often tend to look flat and consequently somewhat boring and inspired. That’s because the camera manufacturer would prefer to give you a flat black and white image by default, in order to retain highlight and shadow detail. The assumption is that you will adjust contrast in Photoshop if you need to.

However, increasing contrast in-camera gives you a better preview that can make it much easier to visualise how the scene converts to black and white. Be careful if you’re shooting JPEG, as you won’t be able to pull back any lost shadow or highlight detail in Photoshop.

But if you’re using Raw, you can set the contrast to whatever you want.

One thing to watch out for in Raw: the histogram and highlight alert are generated from the preview you see on the screen. If you increase contrast, your camera may tell you that the highlights are clipped, when the detail is actually there in the Raw file. You more you increase the contrast, the more likely this is to happen.

Filter effect

Before digital, black and white photographers would use coloured filters to alter the tones of their black and white images. Coloured filters make colours corresponding to the colour of the filter lighter, and the opposite colour on the colour wheel go darker.

For example a red filter makes red colours go lighter and blue ones (such as the sky) go darker.

This is how you could use the filters:

Red: Makes blue skies go really dark. Very dramatic, especially if you increase contrast too.

Orange: Makes blue skies go dark, but not as dark as the red filter.

Yellow: Darkens blue skies a little. Also lightens skin tones, and can be good for portraits.

Green: Makes anything green lighter. Often used to lift photos containing a lot of things that are green, such as grass or vegetation.

Mastering monochrome mode

Here’s an example to help you see the effect of using coloured filters. The differences are subtle, but you will see that the sky is darker and the shutters are lighter in the version with the red filter..

Again, if you’re using JPEG select your colour filter carefully, as you can’t change it in post-processing. In Raw it doesn’t really matter, just choose the filter, if any, that gives you a good preview. You can apply any filter setting you want when you process the image.

Toning effect

On my EOS cameras the toning effects are a bit too strong to be effective. Regardless of whether you are using JPEG or Raw you can tone your photos much more efficiently in post-processing anyway. It’s probably best to leave this setting alone.

Raw vs. JPEG

Remember, if you use monochrome mode with JPEG files you will get what you see on the LCD screen – black and white images with whatever sharpening, contrast and filter effect settings you used. That may suit some photographers but I really suggest that you use Raw. That way you have a full colour image that you can process any way you like, including converting to black and white with software that gives a much better result than your camera possibly could.

Mastering Photography

Mastering monochrome mode

My latest ebook, Mastering Photography: A Beginner’s Guide to Using Digital Cameras introduces you to digital photography and helps you get the most out of your camera. It covers concepts such as lighting and composition as well as the camera settings you need to master to take photos like the ones in this article.

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Read more from our Tips & Tutorials category.

Andrew S. Gibson is a writer and photographer living in New Zealand. He is the author of over twenty photography ebooks and he's giving two of them away. Sign up to his monthly newsletter to receive complementary copies of The Creative Image and Use Lightroom Better.

  • Tiago

    Just a recommendation. IF you are serious about black and white, on a budget, get a mirrorless. I have a sony nex for instance, but you could use a fuji, a m43s, etc. You can adapt old lenses to give a very cool old look.
    Also, with a mirrorless (and even with a DSLT, as sony’s cameras with translucent mirror) you can see on the Electronic viewfinder how it will look with Monochrome applied. You put the camera to raw+jpg and the style to black and white/monochrome (with a setting called effects on).
    That way you see through the viewfinder in black and white. You can save the raw and jpg. The jpg will be in black and white, but the raw, even though the preview was saved in black and white, has all the color information.

    And again, if you add a couple of cheap old rangefinder soviet lenses, or some more expensive leica or zeiss for leica (or a voightlander for leica M!) you get a camera with a lot of character for black and white, small, easy to carry, etc (with manual focus of course). I have a soviet one, and a couple of minolta old ones (this are bigger) that give very cool old style look.

  • ScottC

    Great article! I process monochromes in Lightroom and it works nicely.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/lendog64/5185252796/

  • http://bit.ly/oufr4c Gnslngr45

    I like the idea of adjusting the monochrome settings in camera since they will give you a better idea of final result – meanwhile the RAW file is unchanged. Good thought.

    Flickr:
    http://bit.ly/oufr4c

  • Tod

    In my mind digital black and white will never replace the film version. Ive just started playing with film black and white and i feel it gives a more organic look

  • http://blogs.gonomad.com/traveltalesfromindia/ Mridula

    I am somehow more partial to color!

    http://blogs.gonomad.com/traveltalesfromindia/

  • Kishore Jothady

    May be I belong to old analog era (I started photography more than 55 years ago and used to carry on my own processing with trusted Kodak D76 and D123 for papers), but digital images come nowhere near the photographs shot on films and printed on silver halide papers – whatever the digital freaks may say.

  • Titilola Popoola

    Maybe someone can help me with something. I found this setting on my Nikon D5100 and i was blown away. However, when I took shots in this mode and brought them into Lightroom…….LR immediately converted (or rather displayed for me) the color version! Am I missing something?

  • https://marius-fotografie.blogspot.com marius2die4

    Depending on subject, You can chose B&W or standard processing. Here is one example
    http://marius-fotografie.blogspot.ro/2013/06/dealuri.html

  • Kate

    I have an olympus om d em5 – the black and white art film setting in filters is so good and gritty that it makes your teeth slam shut in a crocadile smile of pure satisfaction. As an earlier comment advised, the jpeg is saved as b and w and the raw retains all the colour info which is a brilliant option to have in camera.

  • http://www.dangling-thoughts.com Nitesh

    Great Article by Andrew Gibson!! I like his blog and kind of detail he provides for portraits.

    I like doing portraits, mostly street shots, in Black and White using my D5100. I usually keep the dual-save settings of in-camera JPG processing to monochrome in addition to RAW and usually get good results with JPG. But in cases where I feel unsatisfied, I post-process colored RAW to get what I like. This helps me a most of the time. For portraits I usually keep orange filter while converting to monochrome. Lightroom4 gives richer BnW conversion as compared to Silver Efex plugin in my Aperture.

    But taking black and white pics of nature is a challenge as nature is all about colors. Flower macros look gorgeous in black and white as in macros the tones have usually 2 or 3 different colors. Here is the macro shot of one flower that I recently took and post processed the RAW to BnW.

    http://www.dangling-thoughts.com/2013/09/a-thoughtful-mind.html

    (PS:You can ignore the philosophy.)

  • artlover

    How can I learn about your drawings?

  • http://harjeevchadha.wordpress.com/ Harjeev S Chadha

    Great Article Andrew.
    I shoot in RAW and tried experimenting with this technique but found that when I import the images in LR, the effects tend to go away, which I understand is basically the purpose of shooting in RAW but still.
    After a bit of searching on the internet I discovered that if I import the images in DPP (I’m a Canon User) the effect remains. Could you please share if there is any way to retain the effect in RAW in LR without having to go to DPP.
    I know that we can create the same effect in PP in LR but is there any workaround to have the same on import itself.
    Cheers

  • http://www.andrewsgibson.com/blog/ Andrew S. Gibson

    As far as I know you can’t – Lightroom works differently to DPP and doesn’t attempt to translate the settings that DPP recognises into their Lightroom equivalents.

    But there is a way to do what you want. Create a black and white Develop Preset in Lightroom (which could be as simple as just setting Treatment to Black & White in the Basic Panel) and then you can apply that preset to your Raw files when you import them. Or you could use one of Lightroom’s built-in Black & White Presets. You can choose a Develop Preset in the Apply During Import panel when you import your Raw files.

  • http://harjeevchadha.wordpress.com/ Harjeev S Chadha

    Thanks Andrew. Will try and do the same on import by applying a preset on import itself. I too am not too fond of DPP and like to have all my pictures and settings in one place,ie LR.
    Cheers

  • Lisa Moyer

    I have really benefited from your insights into Lightroom. Thxs!

  • Davy Dash’e

    …awesome!!! i have l added a skill in my photography..thanks!

Some older comments

  • Nitesh

    September 28, 2013 11:04 pm

    Great Article by Andrew Gibson!! I like his blog and kind of detail he provides for portraits.

    I like doing portraits, mostly street shots, in Black and White using my D5100. I usually keep the dual-save settings of in-camera JPG processing to monochrome in addition to RAW and usually get good results with JPG. But in cases where I feel unsatisfied, I post-process colored RAW to get what I like. This helps me a most of the time. For portraits I usually keep orange filter while converting to monochrome. Lightroom4 gives richer BnW conversion as compared to Silver Efex plugin in my Aperture.

    But taking black and white pics of nature is a challenge as nature is all about colors. Flower macros look gorgeous in black and white as in macros the tones have usually 2 or 3 different colors. Here is the macro shot of one flower that I recently took and post processed the RAW to BnW.

    http://www.dangling-thoughts.com/2013/09/a-thoughtful-mind.html

    (PS:You can ignore the philosophy.)

  • Kate

    September 27, 2013 06:30 am

    I have an olympus om d em5 - the black and white art film setting in filters is so good and gritty that it makes your teeth slam shut in a crocadile smile of pure satisfaction. As an earlier comment advised, the jpeg is saved as b and w and the raw retains all the colour info which is a brilliant option to have in camera.

  • marius2die4

    September 27, 2013 06:17 am

    Depending on subject, You can chose B&W or standard processing. Here is one example
    http://marius-fotografie.blogspot.ro/2013/06/dealuri.html

  • Titilola Popoola

    September 26, 2013 04:30 am

    Maybe someone can help me with something. I found this setting on my Nikon D5100 and i was blown away. However, when I took shots in this mode and brought them into Lightroom.......LR immediately converted (or rather displayed for me) the color version! Am I missing something?

  • Kishore Jothady

    September 25, 2013 02:08 am

    May be I belong to old analog era (I started photography more than 55 years ago and used to carry on my own processing with trusted Kodak D76 and D123 for papers), but digital images come nowhere near the photographs shot on films and printed on silver halide papers - whatever the digital freaks may say.

  • Mridula

    September 24, 2013 08:15 pm

    I am somehow more partial to color!

    http://blogs.gonomad.com/traveltalesfromindia/

  • Tod

    September 24, 2013 07:48 am

    In my mind digital black and white will never replace the film version. Ive just started playing with film black and white and i feel it gives a more organic look

  • Gnslngr45

    September 24, 2013 12:37 am

    I like the idea of adjusting the monochrome settings in camera since they will give you a better idea of final result - meanwhile the RAW file is unchanged. Good thought.

    Flickr:
    http://bit.ly/oufr4c

  • ScottC

    September 23, 2013 08:09 pm

    Great article! I process monochromes in Lightroom and it works nicely.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/lendog64/5185252796/

  • Tiago

    September 23, 2013 09:11 am

    Just a recommendation. IF you are serious about black and white, on a budget, get a mirrorless. I have a sony nex for instance, but you could use a fuji, a m43s, etc. You can adapt old lenses to give a very cool old look.
    Also, with a mirrorless (and even with a DSLT, as sony's cameras with translucent mirror) you can see on the Electronic viewfinder how it will look with Monochrome applied. You put the camera to raw+jpg and the style to black and white/monochrome (with a setting called effects on).
    That way you see through the viewfinder in black and white. You can save the raw and jpg. The jpg will be in black and white, but the raw, even though the preview was saved in black and white, has all the color information.

    And again, if you add a couple of cheap old rangefinder soviet lenses, or some more expensive leica or zeiss for leica (or a voightlander for leica M!) you get a camera with a lot of character for black and white, small, easy to carry, etc (with manual focus of course). I have a soviet one, and a couple of minolta old ones (this are bigger) that give very cool old style look.

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