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Levitation Photography 7 Tips for Getting a Great Image

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Levitation images are magical! They draw the viewer in and make them think about what’s not quite right. If you search the internet for levitation photography, you will find amazing examples. However, levitation photography hasn’t become wildly popular yet. I assume it’s because levitation photography looks really difficult. I think most people would be surprised to learn that in its most basic form, it’s just compositing two or more images in editing software.

Like most portrait photographers, I shoot what I’m good at, and mostly stay inside my little portrait box. Recently, I decided I needed to get my creative juices flowing again and get out of my comfort zone. Levitation photography caught my eye. I learned the basics of how to create such images from posts like this: How to Shoot a Mysterious Levitation Photo.

My first levitation experiment was rough, to say the least. I knew the basics of how to accomplish a levitation photograph, but the images turned out mediocre. The best part though, was coming home after the shoot and writing down all the things I had learned to make my levitation images better for the next time. Below, you’ll see the lessons I learned, so you don’t have to learn the hard way.

Preparing for the Shoot

Tip #1 – Gather Your Equipment

In order to create a levitation photograph, you must have: a camera (that has manual focus capabilities), a tripod, a willing model, a strong fan (if your model has medium to long hair), and something to prop your model up (a stool, chair, or ladder). If you have a camera remote, bring that along too.

Tip #2 – Tell Your Model What to Wear

Clothing can make or break a levitation image.

  • Solid color clothing is best. Prints and patterns can make it difficult if you need to clone out certain parts of clothing or liquefy fabric.
  • Tell your model not to wear a jacket or sweater. Anytime the model lays upside-down, or sideways, the garment should be hanging down. But if he/she is laying on a stool, the jacket won’t be able to naturally hang leaving the image looking less realistic.
  • If you’re going for a feminine levitation shot, long dresses, skirts, or extra flowing fabric can help create the look you’re going for.

Tip #3 – Shoot on a Cloudy Day

Sun and harsh shadows have the potential to create a lot of extra work for you in post-production. Editing out the stools and ladders, yet keeping a realistic shadow of your subject can turn into a job for Photoshop experts.

During the Shoot

Tip #4 – Shoot from a Low Angle

You will want to shoot from a low perspective to give the illusion that your subject is high in the air. However, be mindful of how low you are. If you are lower than the prop your model is standing/laying on, the prop will block parts of his/her body. It is safest to shoot in line with the top of the prop your model is on. Having your model situated at the very front of the prop will also lessen the chance of cutting into the body.

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When I erased the garbage can, parts of the model’s body looks like it went missing since it was hiding behind the garbage can.

Tip #5 – Always Photograph the Empty Background

When preparing to photograph the frames that will create your final levitation image, follow these steps.

  1. Set up your shot with your model in the frame.
  2. Plan the angle you are going to shoot from and set up your camera on the tripod.
  3. When your model is in place, choose the focus point on your subject.
  4. Set your camera to manual focus and don’t touch it!
  5. Take the different shots suggested below, in Tip #6, without moving your focus point or your camera.
  6. After you’re sure you’ve captured all the images you need with your model and props, remove EVERYTHING from the scene. Photograph ONLY the empty background. This is the most important image you will take.

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Tip #6 – Take Multiple Shots to Create One Image

The most basic levitation image is a composition of two or more frames. At the bare minimum, you will need at least a shot of the background and one of the model in that background.

Most great levitation images use a few more frames to add interest and make the final image more provoking. Here is a list of some shots you might want to take all without changing the focus and position of the camera:

  1. Model on the prop(s) – the focus of this shot is on what the arms, legs, and body are doing.
  2. Hair and facial expression – the focus of this shot is to capture the models expression and hair moving like it would naturally if the model was really in that position (floating straight up, blowing behind her, etc.). *Hair dryers and small fans are not strong enough to propel hair in specific directions. The longer and heavier the hair, the more powerful the fan needs to be.
  3. Clothing – the focus of this shot is to capture the movement of the clothing (if needed). If your model is being pulled one direction, what direction should the loose fabric be moving?
  4. Additional props – the focus of this shot is to photograph any extra props you want in the picture (if desired).
  5. Empty background – see Tip #5 above to learn more about the importance of this shot.
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Shot 2 is a perfect example of how a strong fan would have made the shot more realistic with her hair blowing behind her instead of being held up by an assistant. We did not need to photograph additional props for this image, therefore, we did not do a “Shot 4” for this composition.

After the Shoot

Tip #7 – Putting the Images Together

Many levitation photographers use Adobe Lightroom and Photoshop to create their final images. Regardless of your software choice, it is recommended to first color correct the series of shots so they are all the same. Lightroom has a great “sync” feature to make sure the exact same settings are applied to the entire series of images.

Next, open the images in an editing software like Photoshop. Start with the empty background image. Next, add in the main image of your model as a layer with a “Reveal All” mask. Simply use a black paintbrush on the mask to remove the props supporting your model. The end of this article describes each step in more detail. Repeat those steps for each frame you’d like to add. Finally, you can merge your layers and put the finishing touches on your final image. Then voila, you have a gorgeous piece of levitation art.

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1 – Empty background shot is the bottom layer, with the model image above it. 2 – Select the model image and go to “Layers”> “Layer Mask” > “Reveal All”. 3 – Select the paintbrush, make sure it is black. 4 – Simply brush over the props that you don’t want to show in the final image.

Creating levitation images lets your fantasies become “realities”. Don’t let the laws of physics prohibit you from creating true art For more inspiration, check out these great levitation images to see what is possible. You’ll be amazed.

Your Turn

Have you tried creating a levitation photograph? What was your experience? Do you have any additional tips that would help those getting started? Let us know in the comments. Also, feel free to include a link in the comments to your levitation work. We’d love to see what you create!

Read more from our Tips & Tutorials category

Danielle Ness has recently moved to Maui, Hawaii and just launched Simply Maui Photography. When she's not photographing portraits in Maui, HI, she's traveling the world or floating in the ocean with her husband. You can also connect with Danielle on Instagram and Facebook.

  • Shutterbug

    I have been wanting to try an elevation shot for ages but on a rural property with no handy models, and spouse always working intestate, it was difficult to figure out what to do. But on a wet morning today I gave myself a task of mastering it using a garden stool and a doll. When I got rid of the stool she looked like she was sitting on the grass. So then I had to use the quick selection tool to copy her and go back to my original background and paste her elsewhere. Thanks for your very helpful info which I used to guide me. Now all I want is a real model!

  • Now our dream to fly can be achieved with photoshop, and these are few stunning examples of levitation photography

  • ashmund

    heres my first try =)

  • Arch

    My first attempt, lots of fun and can’t wait to do more.

  • ?ukasz Grzegorek

    Some time ago.

  • abdullah

    its amazing!! iam going to try that and ill show you the results soon 😉

  • Camera Man
  • Southocean

    Well this is my 3rd or 4th attempt xD

  • Nicole Lucas Dawson

    This was my second try at levitation photography. Not a very good edit. I’m still learning Photoshop and Lightroom.

  • Krisztián Korhetz

    Here’s my first levitation photo, just completed. It was very funny during processing… thank you for the guide! 🙂

  • TR Young

    Great tips! I made my first attempt at a levitation shot last night. It’s a simple shot, with only 2 images used to create, but I liked it. I need to shoot at an angle that better shows separation between my model and the ground; I figured that out afterward, but I still was happy with the outcome. Now I’m ready to do more!

  • CF

    A band photo shoot I recently did.

  • John Truman

    I did this for a client. Like a year ago.

    http://www.TrumanArts.com

  • Annija

    Made this as my homework at photo school last year.

  • Cecilia Svensson

    Done a few “simple” version of levitation photos, this was my first try simulating floating in water. Love this genre! 🙂

  • Vladimír Ková?ík

    hI and how about this one…

  • Michael Rodo

    Did this one a few years ago…. cool school & staff.
    https://goo.gl/photos/y57rvkrmapJjYR87A

  • Jackie Rose

    This is simply amazing!!!

  • Jackie Rose

    You cant really tell shes levitating. If you had gotten all of her body then that would’ve made this picture great!

  • TR Young

    I did get all of her body. Under the picture it reads, “View More” and you have to click there to see the entire photograph.

  • TR Young

    I did get all of her body. Under the picture it reads, “See More” and you have to click there to see the entire photograph.

  • TR Young

    Look down just below the picture. It says, “see more”. Click there, and you will see the entire photograph. 🙂

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