Interview with Photographer Thomas Hawk - Digital Photography School

Interview with Photographer Thomas Hawk

In this video Marc Silber from SilberStudios interviews photographer Thomas Hawk about how he goes about his photography.

Take home lesson: carry your camera everywhere – Thomas does and as a result he’s on his way to publishing his goal of 1,000,000 photographs in a lifetime!

If you enjoyed this article, you might also like...

Darren Rowse is the editor and founder of Digital Photography School and SnapnDeals. He lives in Melbourne Australia and is also the editor of the ProBlogger Blog Tips. Follow him on Instagram, on Twitter at @digitalPS or on Google+.

  • Pongo

    Hawk seems to be confusing quantity with quality. Other than taking lots of shots, there’s nothing really there but a lot of expensive equipment. The true turning point in his career, as far as I can tell, was when he began to get attention for being thrown out of museums and other places for taking pictures.

  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/mistersimbol Ricster

    Great video! Now i understand how Thomas publishes a new photo almost every day! He’s an awesome photographer and he is really filling up his work on Flickr. Cool!

  • czed

    how lame is this…

  • Peter

    pretty basic information…but still inspirational….thank you DPS…

  • http://www.lexansystems.com Christopher

    I noticed in the beginning he had a lens mounted in reverse for macro work.

  • Chris

    Actually, there is a difference between taking 1000 shots and 100 shots.

    1. Equipment wear. Cameras have a shutter cycle rating for a reason. If you shoot more shots than necessary, you needlessly accelerate your camera’s inevitable failure. That’s OK, though, if you’re making enough money to replace or service your camera body(s) on a regular basis.

    2. The real killer is the extra time required to sort the photos. If you have nothing else to do, that’s OK. But in the time it takes you to sift through 1000 photos, you could have done some more useful things. Like go out and shoot a fresh subject. Or recharge some batteries. Or clean your lenses. Or talk to your kids.

    I really despise the message that digital photography frees shooters from the tryanny of darkroom costs. I did a job last week for a client who just needed a headshot for a promo poster. Simple stuff. Less than 36 frames later, we had the headshot and three variations. Before I left the location, I had four image selections (more than the client needed) ready to go, enhanced and burned to disc. The client was amazed. He told me how the last time a photographer did this job he shot about 200 frames. I explained I used to shoot film and it remains a habit to take more time setting the shot up and less time clicking the shutter.

    I’m not saying everyone should work this way. I’m not trying to paint myself as a model of efficiency. It just irks me no end that the message that shooting quantity to deliver quality is worth pursuing. I believe it is helping turn noob photographers into monkeys.

Some older comments

  • Chris

    August 7, 2009 09:19 am

    Actually, there is a difference between taking 1000 shots and 100 shots.

    1. Equipment wear. Cameras have a shutter cycle rating for a reason. If you shoot more shots than necessary, you needlessly accelerate your camera's inevitable failure. That's OK, though, if you're making enough money to replace or service your camera body(s) on a regular basis.

    2. The real killer is the extra time required to sort the photos. If you have nothing else to do, that's OK. But in the time it takes you to sift through 1000 photos, you could have done some more useful things. Like go out and shoot a fresh subject. Or recharge some batteries. Or clean your lenses. Or talk to your kids.

    I really despise the message that digital photography frees shooters from the tryanny of darkroom costs. I did a job last week for a client who just needed a headshot for a promo poster. Simple stuff. Less than 36 frames later, we had the headshot and three variations. Before I left the location, I had four image selections (more than the client needed) ready to go, enhanced and burned to disc. The client was amazed. He told me how the last time a photographer did this job he shot about 200 frames. I explained I used to shoot film and it remains a habit to take more time setting the shot up and less time clicking the shutter.

    I'm not saying everyone should work this way. I'm not trying to paint myself as a model of efficiency. It just irks me no end that the message that shooting quantity to deliver quality is worth pursuing. I believe it is helping turn noob photographers into monkeys.

  • Christopher

    June 26, 2009 02:46 am

    I noticed in the beginning he had a lens mounted in reverse for macro work.

  • Peter

    June 21, 2009 11:25 pm

    pretty basic information...but still inspirational....thank you DPS...

  • czed

    June 21, 2009 08:19 pm

    how lame is this...

  • Ricster

    June 21, 2009 03:43 pm

    Great video! Now i understand how Thomas publishes a new photo almost every day! He's an awesome photographer and he is really filling up his work on Flickr. Cool!

  • Pongo

    June 21, 2009 12:18 pm

    Hawk seems to be confusing quantity with quality. Other than taking lots of shots, there's nothing really there but a lot of expensive equipment. The true turning point in his career, as far as I can tell, was when he began to get attention for being thrown out of museums and other places for taking pictures.

Receive a FREE SAMPLE of our Portrait Photography Ebook

  • Guaranteed for 2 full months
  • Pay by PayPal or CreditCard
  • Instant Digital Download

Receive a FREE SAMPLE of our Portrait Photography Ebook

  • Guaranteed for 2 full months
  • Pay by PayPal or CreditCard
  • Instant Digital Download

Receive a FREE SAMPLE of our Portrait Photography Ebook

  • Guaranteed for 2 full months
  • Pay by PayPal or CreditCard
  • Instant Digital Download

Sign up to the free DPS PHOTOGRAPHY COURSE

  • Guaranteed for 2 full months
  • Pay by PayPal or CreditCard
  • Instant Digital Download

GET DAILY free tips, news and reviews via our RSS Feed

Sign up to the free

DPS PHOTOGRAPHY COURSE

  • Guaranteed for 2 full months
  • Pay by PayPal or CreditCard
  • Instant Digital Download

GET DAILY free tips, news and reviews via our RSS Feed

Sign up to the free

DPS PHOTOGRAPHY COURSE

  • Guaranteed for 2 full months
  • Pay by PayPal or CreditCard
  • Instant Digital Download
Today’s Deal: 365 days of professional photography training – Save $60VIEW DEAL
DPS NEWSLETTER
DPS NEWSLETTER
DPS NEWSLETTER

DPS offers a free weekly newsletter with: 
1. new photography tutorials and tips
2. latest photography assignments
3. photo competitions and prizes

Enter your email below to subscribe.
Email:
 
 
Get DAILY free tips, news and reviews via our RSS feed