How to Make a Remote Shutter Release from a Doorbell [DIY SPECIAL] - Digital Photography School
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How to Make a Remote Shutter Release from a Doorbell [DIY SPECIAL]

In this DIY tutorial Philip Schütz (see his Flickr account here) takes us through the process of making a wireless remote shutter release from a doorbell. NOTE: no responsibility for damage to you, your camera or doorbell will be taken by DPS: proceed with care.

Did you ever want to try wildlife shots, but the animals were scared by your presence? Did you ever want to do self portraits, but your IR remote couldn’t do the job? Real wireless remotes can help you, but they are an expensive piece of equipment. In this tutorial you will learn how to modify a wireless doorbell, that you can get in any home depot store or garage sale, to make your Canon EOS DSLR focus and release the shutter from a great distance.

Finished.jpg

Please note: I do not take any responsibility if your camera and/or you take any damage. Building the wireless control requires a bit of soldering, the soldering iron is hot and if you short?circuit parts you could destroy the doorbell. However, don’t worry if you never used a soldering iron before, if you follow the instructions carefully and handle the soldering iron with care any damage is very unlikely. You don’t have to worry about high voltages or currents, the bell and the camera use only batteries, you should avoid touching any parts anyway unless you have to.

1. What you need

  • A small soldering iron (15 – 25W)
  • Big tweezers or needle?nosed pliers
  • Two pieces of wire, you can cut almost any piece of old wire you have
  • A stereo cable with 2.5mm plug (Or a 2.5mm to 3.5mm adapter and old headphones)
  • A MOC 3020 or MOC 3040 chip, ask the local electronics store, they’ll help you out
  • A wireless doorbell, make sure it has an LED that is lit when the bell rings and a long melody

2. The Bell

At first you should test the bell, the LED has to light up when you press the button, and it is best if the LED stays lit for as long as you push the button on the remote. Open the bell and disconnect the speaker, you don’t want the animals be frightened by the sound, do you? Test the bell again, even if you disconnect the speaker, the LED should still light up.

Now disconnect the LED. If it has high legs, you can just cut if off near the LED, that’s the easiest way. If it is soldered directly to the board, you have to heat the solder spots on the other side of the board with your soldering iron and pull it out.

Take your MOC and look at the top, the legs facing down. There is a little marking, a small circle or a semi?circle imprinted in the case. In the photo below you can see the numbers of the pins I will refer to from now on. On the left side of the MOC between pins 1 and 2, there is a LED, similar to the one you just removed from the bell. The pins 4 and 6 on the right side of the MOC are only connected, if the LED in the left part is lit.

MOC 3020.jpg

It gets a bit tricky now, so be careful. If you have soldered before, you can skip the following section.

Excursus: Soldering

Turn your soldering iron on and wait until it is hot. Meanwhile you take your piece of wire and remove the isolation on the one end. Now wrap the copper core of the wire around the part you want to connect it to. Put some solder on the tip of your soldering iron so it melts.

Now bring the solder onto the connection of the wire and the other part so it flows on the wire and the other part to get a good electrical connection. Repeat until the wire does not move anymore. Use the tweezers or pliers to hold the wire or the chip in place. Pull gently to test the connection.

You have to connect pins 1 and 2 to where the LED was before you cut it out. The anode must be connected to pin 1 and the cathode to pin 2, do not confuse them, it will not work the other way round. You should see which one is which from a small drawing on the board (see photo below). If there is no drawing, well then it is a bit of a guess. I suggest you only connect the wires without soldering until you know if you got it right. You can use two pieces of wire like I did, or you can connect the MOC directly to the board if you know what you are doing.

Diode.jpg

Be careful when soldering: Pins 1 and 2 and the wires on the board must not be connected in any way, don’t use too much solder.

3. The Camera

We will now work with the camera. Plug your 2.5mm cable into the cable release connector of the camera. Now cut the cable at the desired length (I suggest at least 4 inches) after the plug and remove the isolation. You should now see for separate wires, two of which are isolated again and two blank ones. Remove a piece of the second isolation as well. Make sure none of the wires are connected and turn your camera on.

Cable.jpg

One of the isolated wires connected to either of the blank ones will cause the camera to focus, the other isolated wire connected to a blank one will make the camera focus and shoot. This alone is an improvised cable release, should you ever need one. Now solder one of the blank wires to pin 6 of the MOC and the isolated wire that made the camera focus and shoot to pin *4*, or vice versa, it doesn’t matter here. You can now test it ? press the button of the remote and the camera should take a photo. If the camera focuses but does not shoot, try holding the button of the remote for some time until it does. Nothing happens? Most likely you switched anode and cathode of the LED ? fix that and it should work.

4. The Case

Put everything in the case of the doorbell, make sure nothing is connected to anything it should not be and cut a hole for the wire to the camera. I secured the cable with some tape for strain?relief.

Congratulations, you are done!

Read more from our Cameras & Equipment category.

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  • Philip

    Hi Roma,
    I’m the one who wrote the article. I’ve looked at the cable release of the a230 and the plug doesn’t look very common to me. I guess the only way to build the remote shutter release is buying the cable release an then cutting the cable (even if that hurts) then try to find out which wires need to be connected to make the camera fire. If you know that you can do the rest like explained in the article. The two wires that make the camera fire need to be connected to pins 4 and 6.

  • Sam

    I am still interested in if anyone that has built this unit has the same issue, of the camera not resetting, automatically, after they fire off the first shot.
    Do the manufactured units have the same issue?

    Philip, are you able to answer this, please.

    Thanks

  • http://martybugs.net/blog Martin

    @Sam: if the camera won’t reset after a shot, then it sounds like the remote is holding down contacts closed or something.

    Which camera are you using this with?

  • Sam

    Thanks for the response.

    I am using a Canon 10D.

    I will have to think about how to get the contacts to open up.
    I must admit that I did think about that, at one point, but never tried to solve it. Back to the drawing board.
    My tests with a multimeter do show that it triggers, and then releases, but not all the way, so I will have to check the circuitry, and see where the signal is still holding a charge on the trigger line.

  • Bob

    Hi, thanks for the great tutorial for making a remote. I have a Fujifilm S100FS and want to make even simpler remote, for tripod use. It has a USB connector. Please advise how to wire the USB conector so that the camera shoots. Thanks.

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  • sam

    Okay, I had almost given up on this, but that is not my style.

    I gave it another go, and am happy to report that it works flawlessly now. Not sure what changed.
    I am now using this on a 40D.

    Thanks for this project, and all the help that has been provided, here on the site.
    Great place to be, and have picked up a lot of interesting ideas and tips.

    sam

  • http://SGArts.co.uk Samuel

    Can anyone point out what the purpose and operation of the MOC chip is ? i have googled but cant seem to find out exactly what it does

  • ap

    Images are not working for me on this page. Have they been moved?

    It’s far less helpful without the pictures…

Some older comments

  • ap

    August 7, 2012 03:47 pm

    Images are not working for me on this page. Have they been moved?

    It's far less helpful without the pictures...

  • Samuel

    September 20, 2011 09:05 am

    Can anyone point out what the purpose and operation of the MOC chip is ? i have googled but cant seem to find out exactly what it does

  • sam

    July 20, 2011 10:02 pm

    Okay, I had almost given up on this, but that is not my style.

    I gave it another go, and am happy to report that it works flawlessly now. Not sure what changed.
    I am now using this on a 40D.

    Thanks for this project, and all the help that has been provided, here on the site.
    Great place to be, and have picked up a lot of interesting ideas and tips.

    sam

  • spiritual

    July 20, 2011 02:50 am

    In the Aussie, flexibility increases if?Discover the world, fans out there.?Our spirit knows, the link pointing.Lovingthe ones youd spiritual, and other bells return You will.Uses such as, Zarco quien hab?a.,

  • Bob

    December 10, 2010 09:52 pm

    Hi, thanks for the great tutorial for making a remote. I have a Fujifilm S100FS and want to make even simpler remote, for tripod use. It has a USB connector. Please advise how to wire the USB conector so that the camera shoots. Thanks.

  • Sam

    October 9, 2010 12:27 am

    Thanks for the response.

    I am using a Canon 10D.

    I will have to think about how to get the contacts to open up.
    I must admit that I did think about that, at one point, but never tried to solve it. Back to the drawing board.
    My tests with a multimeter do show that it triggers, and then releases, but not all the way, so I will have to check the circuitry, and see where the signal is still holding a charge on the trigger line.

  • Martin

    October 8, 2010 08:42 am

    @Sam: if the camera won't reset after a shot, then it sounds like the remote is holding down contacts closed or something.

    Which camera are you using this with?

  • Sam

    October 8, 2010 06:45 am

    I am still interested in if anyone that has built this unit has the same issue, of the camera not resetting, automatically, after they fire off the first shot.
    Do the manufactured units have the same issue?

    Philip, are you able to answer this, please.

    Thanks

  • Philip

    October 8, 2010 01:33 am

    Hi Roma,
    I'm the one who wrote the article. I've looked at the cable release of the a230 and the plug doesn't look very common to me. I guess the only way to build the remote shutter release is buying the cable release an then cutting the cable (even if that hurts) then try to find out which wires need to be connected to make the camera fire. If you know that you can do the rest like explained in the article. The two wires that make the camera fire need to be connected to pins 4 and 6.

  • roma2509

    September 13, 2010 06:17 am

    Hi.can any body explane how to create a remote shutter release for sony a230?

  • roma2509

    September 13, 2010 06:15 am

    Hi.can any body explane how to create a remote shutter release for sony a230?

  • sam

    August 24, 2010 02:22 am

    For the Canon Cameras, there is software on the disc, that you should have gotten when you purchased the camera, that will allow tethered shooting when connected to the computer, via the USB ports..

  • sam

    August 24, 2010 02:11 am

    Okay, I have built this unit and it kind of works.

    I can fire off one shot, and I get the picture, but, I cannot then fire off another shot, without first disconnecting the cable from the receiver unit, and then reconnecting it.

    Does anyone have the same issue, or does anyone know how to get around this issue by adding another component to the circuit?

  • John

    August 23, 2010 08:02 pm

    Veerendra,

    Very interested in diyphotobits, although having a laptop exposed in a wildlife location is a worry. Have yet to download the program, but will let you know any result with a Canon SLR EOS 450D

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  • tom

    August 18, 2010 08:18 am

    hi pals,

    amazing article.. well, i am looking to freeze high speed action at studio with strove light. but it needs emote shutter release. i got the cheapest solution. i hope it will be safe for my expensive camera... :)

    i'll attached a flash remote trigger at hot shoe and the receiver will attached at strove unit. then i want to attached the dor bel triger to fire my shots at time. is it possible ??

    I am also looking for compatibility of this home made Remote with nikon capture nx pro or some other 3rd party software from my W7 ultimate x64 bit base laptop.

    please clarify... thanks

  • veerendra

    July 27, 2010 11:59 pm

    i needed the remote to make time lapse without disturbing the camera. I found the solution, but it requires a laptop or desktop. a software called diyphotobits. it controls the camera with usb cable, we can set the timing shutter speed, aperture and lots of functions depending upon supported camera.

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  • Vikhyat Puri

    May 21, 2010 06:08 am

    @veerendra
    the Nikon D3000 is compatible with the optional Wireless Remote Control ML-L3. There are two shutter release modes available when using the control: Quick Response mode for immediate triggering of the shutter release and Delayed Remote mode, which delays triggering for two seconds.

    and what you will be making using the servo i guess will be a remote-control servo to physically press the camera’s shutter button. It'll be bulky!

  • veerendra

    March 30, 2010 02:53 am

    I'm in electronics field, i'm good with soldering iron. I have Nikon D3000, it doesn't have cable release option(i think because i searched manual and web also). it has only usb port and AV port. I wanted to trigger the shutter by a servo, with a micro controller(i wanted to do time lapse with my cam) and i'm thinking to add a rf module to it to control wireless and with micro controller timer also.

  • Madhav

    March 29, 2010 02:26 pm

    Veerendra:

    I use a canon rebel XT and it has an remote control jack. The circuit worked just wonderful. If you are comfortable with the soldering iron and electronics, you would immediately see the simple, easy and sure to work circuitry.

    Go ahead, build one, there is joy in Doing it Yourselves, that beats the readymade, off the shelf product purchases.

  • John

    March 28, 2010 10:15 pm

    Veerendra
    I use a Canon Digital SLR EOS 450D, bought with 2 interchangeable lenses. The camera has a Remote Control Jack into which the doorbell output is connected by cable.and 3.5mm plug. Love your name!!!
    John

  • veerendra

    March 28, 2010 05:07 pm

    what camera u used for this ?

  • Amando

    January 1, 2010 05:28 am

    Very good idea, i myself am hacking a wireless door bell, but to send bit streams, and information :) i could very much use one of these as i'm trying to become a sports photographer, this would be handy to take photos of myself whyle riding, snowboarding etc.

  • sebastian

    October 11, 2009 01:59 am

    Hello . i'm from Romania .
    What about triggering a flashgun with that metode.
    How fast is ? i'm worry about sincronization time 1/60minimum.
    thx!

  • John

    October 10, 2009 04:44 pm

    I agree that the DIY project was a great contribution. I have made up the DIY project and it works well! In choosing a doorbell system there were several choices, the cheapest had no LED, but the next cheapest did and was quite satisfactory. I have a nocturnal possum coming to my feeding table and I have ordered a beam-break system to detect its presence and I will need to interface this to the doorbell shutter system. I think my only concern will be the width of the pulse out of the beam-break system, wide enough to trigger the doorbell sytem and hence the c amera shutter. I may have to fatten the pulse, either by increasing the RC time constant or interfacing an intermediate pulse width conversion.

  • Madhav

    October 10, 2009 02:07 am

    A great contribution.

    For rest of you guys, who feel that they might damage the cam, rest assured.

    On the other hand, you are here by your own choice, if you are not confident of being able to DIY, then dont build one. Your suggestions of IR based systems or other stuff available at cheaper prices are unwarranted. If you can appreciate, good, if not , go elsewhere.

  • John

    October 4, 2009 12:16 pm

    I have had discussions about that aspect, but the conclusion was that any movement in the vicinity of the target area could trigger the camera shutter. A beam break system can be concentrated on the area of interest more accurately.

  • Brian

    October 4, 2009 02:08 am

    Hi,
    Has anyone made similar device but using a movement sensor as used in home alarm systems and outdoor security lights? now that would be useful for catching wildlife shots etc
    great site!
    Brian

  • John

    September 18, 2009 11:16 am

    There is a possum here in South Australia that comes regularly each night in the early hours to take its bread from a feeding table at my home. I would like to have an automated shutter release activated by the animal breaking an IF or similar beam.
    Do you have or know of a beam-breaking system that can be allied to your wireless remote DIY?

  • Martin

    July 12, 2009 03:33 pm

    @nalfonso: The MOC is an optocoupler, and it's purpose is to ensure the two sides if the circuit are electrically isolated - ie, the electronics of the doorbell are not directly connected to the electronics of the camera, but use a optical signal.

    @Ashfaq: as far as I can tell, the Kodak z8612 doesn't have any connectivity options for an external shutter release. If you wanted to use an external shutter release, one option is to open up the case, and wire in your own socket for an external shutter release, wiring it in parallel with the camera's shutter release button.

    Alternatively, you could use a remote-control servo to physically press the camera's shutter button. That's how KAP (kite aerial photography) hobbyists typically remotely trigger their cameras. Google for "kap shutter release servo" for more info and photos of people's rigs.

  • Ashfaq

    July 11, 2009 10:09 pm

    Any idea how can this stuff be implemented in a Kodak (EasyShare z8612 IS)?

  • Nalfonso

    July 11, 2009 10:03 am

    What is the fuction of the MOC? Thanks-

  • CheekyGeek

    July 10, 2009 11:37 pm

    This is great. Just what I need for pole photography!

  • Victor W.

    June 27, 2009 09:28 am

    I think it's brilliant that someone wants to take the time and effort to put together such a DIY project. Simple enough for anyone that knows the hot end of a soldering iron from the other to construct and so cheaply too. Why build one when you could just buy it? How about the satisfaction of actually putting the thing together and it works. You could set the camera up next to a bird table and push the button to grab the shot, those birds won't be coming anywhere near whilst you're stood there and doesn't require an expensive telephoto either. Or how about a self portrait as you walk off into a woodland or other scenery press the button and get a shot of the most willing able and cheap model, (yourself), walking off into that scene. All without fiddling about with an IR trigger that has to be pointed at the camera and out of direct sunlight or a cheap fleabay trigger that doesn't. Great work on the share Philip, I'm sure there's many people that will gain the satisfaction of such a device.

  • NIX74

    June 26, 2009 10:19 pm

    Is not a bad idea to remote trigger the camera this way. It is running on RF, so no worry about blockage. IR on the other hand need to face the remote directly to the camera. Anything blocking in front will not work.

    However, what's the true application of this device, I'm still have no clue. Most of the time remote trigger are used to prevent camera shake during shutter movement or self portrait.

    Also it is applicable for Canon Camera, what about Nikon, Sony, Pentax and Olympus ? does it worh the same ?.

  • Harry Joseph

    June 26, 2009 06:21 am

    Fascinating ! Something to do on a rainy day, but couldn't you just buy a remote they are not that expensive.

  • Andy

    June 26, 2009 03:11 am

    If I needed a wireless remote, I would go buy one ...simple as that. What I really like about this article is the fact that it can be done...whoda thunk it? A doorbell? I guess my mind dosen't run in those directions, but I think it's pretty cool that other people's do. Seems pretty creative & out of the box to me.

  • Heather

    June 25, 2009 04:50 am

    I think this is brilliant! I love all sorts of DIY ideas, even if I don't actually put them to use. I personally just ordered a radio remote off ebay for $25 but it's from China and I'm not holding out super-high hopes for the quality. If it ends up not-so-great I'll be giving this a whirl!

  • MeiTeng

    June 24, 2009 01:42 pm

    I would rather spend on a wireless remote. I am not a DIY expert.

  • Philip Schütz

    June 23, 2009 07:34 am

    @alberto
    I wasn't trying to attack you, sorry if it seemed like that :) Triggering from across town is really, well, useless I agree with that. I've heard some people complaining that their IR only works if they hold it in front of the camera where the sensor is and can't use it from behind (unless there is a super-reflective surface near the camera).
    I can understand that it seems like a lot of cost and work to build this, but it the costs were less than 10€ (doorbell and cable from eBay, MOC from electronics store), and it took me about 2hrs to build it and I'm no expert in soldering either ;)

    @reddy
    You won't lose your camera unless you place the hot soldering iron directly on it ;) Seriously, even if you short-circuit something, worst thing that can happen is that your camera keeps taking photos until you pull the plug of the remote

  • reddy

    June 23, 2009 04:28 am

    NO, Thank you, I aint no expert with that kind of stuff and I just bought me a brand new camera. I wont take the chance so I bought the remote shutter release under Aputure Pro Coworker and it works greatly. It only cost me 30 bucks. Good Luck to anyone who gonna take the risk and you lose your camera. Ya be suck if ya take the chance.
    By the way, I got the Nikon D200 camera and it hasnt become popluar like they did before. I've took mine camera and it hasnt show any problem this far. I really love this camera so much. I dont see any problem with grainy or anything like this. Mine picture has come out purfecttttttt......

  • Alberto

    June 23, 2009 03:49 am

    as i said....r u gonna trigger ur camera from the other side of town? for what most people do the regular IR is enough...or even a wired remote. I was just posting this cuz if u pay attention some people were asking for an alternative as they own nikon cameras. It's a good tutorial but most people would rather spend money and time on something else. i wasn't trying to raise hell!

  • Philip Schütz

    June 23, 2009 02:57 am

    @alberto

    Are you sure you didn't see the IR remote? This one is more than IR, which can be only triggered from the front of the camera and to limited distances. The wireless doorbell can be triggered from all around the camera, without seeing it and from far greater distances, which depends on the doorbell. The one I used can do up to 120 metres.
    I saw a wireless remote you can buy in a brochure today, which cost 49€, and it wasn't even a Canon one.

  • Alejandro

    June 23, 2009 12:53 am

    I'd rather spend my DIY time to make something else which is actually productive...

  • Philip Schütz

    June 22, 2009 06:37 pm

    @Victor W.: You are right, your help was awesome, sorry I didn't mention it in the first place, but better late than never:

    I would also recommend visiting Victor W.'s photostream and www.theinvertedimage.com where you can find more interesting DIY stuff by Victor W.

  • Martin

    June 22, 2009 12:56 pm

    @alberto: if you want to trigger your camera from the other side of town, Robert Benson made a 20-mile remote using two-way radios.

    His original post on it appears to be offline, but here's a google cache version of it.

  • Alberto

    June 22, 2009 11:46 am

    Well done but is it really worth the money/time? For nikon, just buy the Nikon wireless remote (if you have a D80, D40 etc...). On amazon is about 10-12 dollars and it work fine. It's not like u r going to trigger ur camera from the other side of town....

  • Martin

    June 22, 2009 10:43 am

    The article mentions using a 2.5mm stereo plug for connecting to the camera.
    However, that will only work with the Canon 300D/350D/400D/450D/1000D cameras, as well as the Pentax K100D/K110D, *istDS/*istDS2, *istDL/*istDL2 and K10D cameras.

    Canon 20D/30D/40D/50D/5D/1D cameras use the proprietary N3 connector, which cannot be purchased as a bare connector.

    The cheapest option for getting an N3 connector is to buy a cheap wired remote (I bought this one) for about USD$5 or so, cut off the N3 connector for use with a DIY remote, and discard the rest of the remote.

    As an alternative to making your own wireless remote using a doorbell, you can buy them cheaply. I have a number of Phottix remotes, including the Phottix Cleon II (review here), and the Phottix Plato (review here).

  • Darren Rowse

    June 22, 2009 09:43 am

    yep - you can get wireless remotes relatively cheaply - but as with most DIY projects part of the reason people like them is for the challenge of constructing something for themselves. If it's not for you - that's fine, but I'm sure there's some DIY lovers out there who will be loving this one.

  • Vilmis

    June 22, 2009 08:37 am

    From what distance this remote will work ?

  • Victor W.

    June 22, 2009 08:32 am

    Glad that I was able to help you so much with this project including the interfacing to the opto-triac.

  • Victor W.

    June 22, 2009 07:35 am

    Great work Philip! Good cheap alternative to a commercial wireless remote and so simply done.

  • Jason Miller

    June 22, 2009 06:37 am

    What about Nikon, does this work with their Cameras as well, or only Canon?

  • MacGyverr

    June 22, 2009 05:10 am

    Wow! This is very helpful and economical solution. Thanks =)
    I just have one question. What kind of cable should I use for the EOS 50D?

  • Peter

    June 22, 2009 04:36 am

    hmmm...an inovative invention, but no thanks...i'll spend $20 for a wireless remote...

    not sure i want to go though all that trouble... = )

  • Paw Larsen

    June 22, 2009 02:23 am

    Not to undermine the article, but the Aputure Pro Coworker remote shutter can be bought at www.linkdelight.com for less than $25.00. For someone like me whom never had much succes with the soldering iron, the very small extra cost is worth it.

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