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Thread: Base Hit

  1. #1
    JKK
    JKK is offline dPS Forum Member
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    Default Base Hit

    One from last year, this was shot through the fence.




    Thanks for looking any advice to help me improve would greatlt be appreciated.
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  2. #2
    windrider86's Avatar
    windrider86 is offline Super Moderator
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    To get the most from the critique section you'll need to include more info. What you need can be found within the critique section rules/guidelines. Thank you in advance for editing your post!
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  3. #3
    Rich_macabre is offline I'm new here!
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    I'm still new but if you don't mind a noob's input. I'd say work with composition a bit more. I know its an action shot and that can be hard to plan but in my opinion, too much is being cut off. The catcher is being cut out, as well as the bat and the gentleman in the back. I think one thing that might help this picture is to crop the catcher out, what that would do is un-cente the batter making it a bit more appealing visually. One thing I learned is you never want the subject or any strong horizon lines to be centered.

  4. #4
    Walkere is offline I'm new here!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rich_macabre View Post
    I'm still new but if you don't mind a noob's input. I'd say work with composition a bit more.
    I'd agree. It seems like the technical stuff is fine (no motion blur, in focus, close proximity to the fence blurs out the chain link, exposure is fine). But you're gonna get a much better shot if you compose it differently.

    Try moving to the other side of the plate. This will allow you to see the batter's face, and create a more appealing image. Since most batters are righty, I like the stake out a spot on the first base sideline so that I can see the player's face instead of their back.

    Lower the camera some. You don't need all the extra space up top, and you could benefit from seeing the batter's feet and/or home plate. Try moving the camera to the left some (to focus on the batter and pitcher) or move to the right some (to get the batter and the catcher). As it is, both the catcher and the pitcher are there... but neither one really seems like a part of the photo.
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  5. #5
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    FJH
    FJH is offline Midlife Crises Maniac
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    I agree with the other posts.

    One thing I'd like to add .... in baseball if you are allowed to, go to the edge of the backstop by 1st or 3rd base. I used to do this with a video camera when my boy was little. The major benefit is, you'll get stronger images that are keepers.
    It's always a good idea to ask the umpire & both managers before the game.

    Keep the dust out of your camera & anticipate the action.
    Who knows, you may wind up being the team photographer. Watch Out For Flying Baseballs = Stay Alert
    Last edited by FJH; 02-24-2012 at 10:22 AM.

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