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Thread: AV or Manual

  1. #1
    suvorc is offline Suvobroto Ray Chaudhuri
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    Default AV or Manual

    I have a simple and straight forward question.

    What should be the preferable mode for capturing potraits in normal room lights. By normal room light I mean may be a tube light.

    If so what would be the settings.

  2. #2
    khiloa is offline dPS Forum Member
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    If you're going to be shooting under steady lighting and not moving or changing around much, I would say manual mode dialed in to exactly the look you want.

    Portraits are often shot at a large aperture (low f number) to separate the subject from the background. A good starting point would be to use a large aperture and adjust the ISO and shutter speed as necessary. Being indoors with typical lighting, you'll probably need a fairly high ISO, maybe 1600 or even more depending on how bright the lights are.
    Last edited by khiloa; 11-08-2012 at 06:20 PM.

  3. #3
    idcanyon is offline dPS Forum Member
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    In generally my advice is to always use AV unless it isn't working for you. AV works just as well or better almost all of the time for most of us. If you are in M mode and are using the camera's meter to set the exposure then you are usually wasting your effort.

    Use M mode if you are are not going to use your camera's meter to determine your exposure, such as when using external manual flash or when setting a fixed exposure for a series of shots that need to be absolutely consistent, such as for a panorama. Also use M if you are in an environment where the meter is regularly being fooled and AV is not giving you good results.

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    rspears's Avatar
    rspears is offline The Wedding Guy
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    I'd respectfully disagree with idcanyon. It may be a matter of preference, and as Bryan Peterson says in his book "Understanding Exposure" (great book by the way) The best settings to use are the ones that will give you the correct exposure.

    I tend to use Manual when I'm in situations where I control the light (or flash) and the ambient light is not changing. If I'm in a situation where I'm changing locations quickly or the light is changing (like at a wedding) then I'm likely to be in Aperture Priority mode. Then I only have to change my aperture settings for when I want to manipulate the depth of field.

    so to answer the original post question, an indoor portrait session with natural light, I would be in manual mode. The settings I usually use in a portrait session are going to be from f5.6 to f8 because that's the "sweet spot" for most of my lenses where I get the sharpest picture, then I'll adjust my shutter speed and ISO to the correct exposure
    Rich Spears www.rspearsphotography.com
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    I see/hear both sides, but I'm going to side with "canyon". Respectfully (truly) disagreeing with the respective disagree...

    Quote Originally Posted by rspears View Post
    ...the best settings to use are the ones that will give you the correct exposure.
    Av mode will give a correct exposure in most conditions. Also, Av mode will help by selecting the shutter that corresponds to the meter. By hitting the exposure with a touch of EC up or down, you can get any exposure that you like. The very first exposure will still be "in the ballpark" even in a worst case situation.

    The OP is asking a question that suggests not a lot of experience just yet with all aspects of exposure. Starting with manual will require a certain level of proficiency or experience and will probably start with unusable exposures at first.

    Personally, I would most likely be in manual. But, I'm almost always using lights (which I control) and drawing from experience.

    But regarding the aperture selected, I totally agree that something in the area of f/5.6 is going to be a good place to start.
    Dave.
    It's not even about the pictures; it's about the memories and communication.

  6. #6
    STROKER ACE is offline I'm new here!
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    I based my thoughts on your question ; I would shoot in Program. The camera computer is faster than you can adapt, adjust and move on. This gives you the advantage to crop, look for a better expression, and in general take better photographs, should the camera decide you need more light, your wink light will auto flash. If it is a portrait setting try to use a tri-pod you will look more pro and the subject will feel more important. It is hard to hand hold a telephoto lens at F-4 @ a 15th.For portraits I always tell others to try a pistol grip camera mount like a Manfroto brand grip and I like to recommend a black tri-pod so you cannot see your own reflection in glasses of the subject. This info can save you from buying equipment that you may regret later, and remember it only cost 80% more to go first class . Stroker Ace

  7. #7
    TylerRandall's Avatar
    TylerRandall is offline PhotoShoots
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    I would go with manual. I tend to always shoot in Manual because I like to tell myself when my exposure is correct. It gives you more versatility in your shots and honestly isn't that hard. I would go with a high aperture (around 1.8-2.8) and a shutter speed that matches your focal length to compensate for motion blur. Just adjust the ISO accordingly.
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  8. #8
    cocuyo is offline I'm new here!
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    Quote Originally Posted by suvorc View Post
    I have a simple and straight forward question.

    What should be the preferable mode for capturing potraits in normal room lights. By normal room light I mean may be a tube light.

    If so what would be the settings.
    Nobody touched it yet.

    Tube light comes in many different flavours. There is no WB setting in the camera that is sure to get it right, so you have to set it to the actual lighting situation.

    Skilled photographers tend to shoot RAW under most circumstances, for the ease of correcting white balance in post production. If you are unfamiliar with RAW, it might be the time to start using it, or you'll have to tame your camera's white balance beforehand.

    Standard procedure is using a white reference, a known neutral white reference and shoot it or set the camera with it in the same light as taking the photos, but if you don't have any, in many cases the ceiling beside the FL tube may work for setting it. Then you use instructions per your camera's manual to measure and set white balance. It is the setting with two wedges pointing toward each other, with a ball between. Your manual will tell you how to use the feature.

    Other advice above is useful. Either A mode or P mode will do if you don't want to set manually. You may set ISO manually to a suitable value or set your camera to Auto-ISO.

  9. #9
    MattEthan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cocuyo View Post
    Nobody touched it yet.

    Tube light comes in many different flavours. There is no WB setting in the camera that is sure to get it right, so you have to set it to the actual lighting situation.
    I agree, the tube light will give you some real problems, not only in WB, but also directionality.

    For my two cents - if you're worried about shooting Manual, then shoot Av, I personally find P useless, and Tv for very specific situations.

  10. #10
    marry9091 is offline I'm new here!
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