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  1. #1
    shawman is offline I'm new here!
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    Default T2i vs full frame dilemma

    Hi,

    I moved from 35mm years ago to P&S digital and and after playing with a friends digital SLR have decided to set myself up with some new gear. My friend shoots semi professionally and suggested I look into a Rebel T2i as a good all around starter body. After doing some research on this camera I learned about the difference between crop bodies and full frames. I was trying to pick out lenses for the T2i that would transfer to a full frame body if I ever decided to make the change but I am having difficulties with this. If I chose standard EF lenses then I wont be able to get lenses in the right focal lengths that will work for a crop body now. If I chose EF-S lenses then they wont work in the full frame body and I will have to repurchase lenses if I ever make the change to full frame. For a hobbyist that is just looking for quality equipment what would be the best route to go? If I do go with the T2i I was looking at a package deal that would be $550 with the standard kit lens plus an 55-250 for an extra $135. I donít really want the standard kit lens but its basically free with the package. For better lenses I was looking at the EF-S 15-85mm, EF 50mm 1.4, EF-S 10-22mm, and some day down the road a EF 70-200. What would be the best way to go? Thanks

  2. #2
    RichardTaylor is online now dPS +1000 Club
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    I shoot with both Canon full frame and crop bodies.

    It all depends on what you want to shoot and how far you want to take your photography.

    The only problem for EF-s is if that if you want to go real wide that you may need a 12/12-22/24 lens. Otherwise the EF-s kit lens is a 28mm (equivalent) FOV lens at the wide end and there is not really a very fast and very wide lens for crop bodies.

    The Canon 24-70/105 work ok on a crop camera although they are not real wide being ~ 35mm equivalent on the wide end. (I own a 24-105)
    When it comes to the teles I would not get an EF-s (The 70-200/300 and 100-400 work ok on crop bodies and I do own some of these).

    There are some 3rd party alternatives to Canon lenses.

    Keep in mind that it you ever go full frame it may not be a replacement but as well as, so you may still find an EF-s lens handy (especially an ultrawide zoom) and not need buy any replacement lenses.
    Last edited by RichardTaylor; 12-28-2011 at 09:40 AM.

  3. #3
    Tzetsin's Avatar
    Tzetsin is offline dPS +1000 Club
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    Well the best answer would be tailor fit to your budget. If I knew that quality was more important than money, of course I'd just say stick with the L series and forget the Ef-s line. The L line work perfectly with crop sensor cameras, and as long as you understand the focal length conversion are no problem at all.

    Don't think of the crop factor as a Detriment, it actually helps you as much as it hurts. Wide angle lenses may not go as wide, but telephoto lenses will go further, and those lenses cost a lot more. (technicalities aside)

    A really versatile setup is to have one crop body for telephoto work, and a full frame body for wide work. In a general sense, the image sensors of both the 5Dmkii and the t2I deliver very good quality, so there is no need to ditch the t2i when you upgrade to the full frame. Keep it and use that crop sensor to your advantage. on that note, I'd recommend the t3i, or 60d because of the advantages the articulating screen will give you. They cost a fair bit more at the outset, but if you plan on continuing to use it after upgrading to full frame, it makes more sense, and compliments the 5D very well.

    On the other hand, if money is an issue, as it is for most people, then go with the Ef-s lenses. The image quality is more than good enough, especially when just learning. Photographic gear holds it's value very well, when you upgrade to a full frame you'll have to start building your kit over again, but by then you'll have a much better idea of the focal lengths that are most important to you. EF lenses are generally many times more expensive than Ef-s lenses, so getting the lens that works best for you is that much more important, and you'll be in a very good position to make the best choice for yourself.

  4. #4
    Preeb is offline dPS Forum Member
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    As others have said, it all depends on your shooting style and budget and ultimate aim. I considered the full frame option on my first lens purchase, but I've since realized that I don't need it, and don't ever plan to go that route. Therefore, the first lens I bought was the 17-40 f4 L, and I've since sold that and replaced it with the EF-S 17-55 f2.8 IS, which is really a better lens for me, with a larger max aperture and longer reach, with no loss of IQ.

    Now I have what I consider a nearly ideal kit on a crop body for my photo needs (see my signature). I have 3 EF-S lenses and one "L" lens. I have a second "L" on order (100mm f2.8 L Macro), and then I'm turning off the cash flow and staying with what I have. All are highly rated lenses, regardless of the model.
    Rick

    Canon 60D; EF-S 10-22 f3.5-f4.5 USM; EF-S 17-55 f2.8 USM; EF-S 60mm f2.8 Macro; EF100mm f2.8 L IS Macro USM; EF 70-200 f4 L IS USM + 1.4x II TC --- Soon to have: Fuji Finepix XP 200 Waterproof

  5. #5
    Doug Pardee is offline Not photogenic
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    My recommendation is to forget about full-frame until you're ready to do full-frame ó if you ever are. An awful lot of fairly serious amateurs are looking the opposite direction now, to the new breed of smaller non-SLR cameras with interchangeable lenses. Full-frame will never be inexpensive, and for most kinds of photography, smaller cameras can do just as good a job.

    But let's say you do go full-frame in the future. What are you going to do with your APS-C equipment? Sell it? So sell the EF-S lenses with it. Also, resale prices on decent lenses are surprisingly high, so you could dispose of them separately if you wanted to. Problem solved.

    Bear in mind that a modern full-frame DSLR demands quality lenses. If you put an inexpensive full-frame lens on a full-frame DSLR, you'll quickly find out the limitations of that lens. Personally, if I were thinking Canon full-frame, I'd also be thinking of nothing less than L lenses for it.

    Buy lenses for the camera you have now. That's my advice, worth every penny you paid for it.

  6. #6
    shawman is offline I'm new here!
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    I do have 35 mm experience and that is what is causing me the dilemma. I know what size lens will give me certain results so going with the crop body I have to convert the size to 35 mm equivalent. My budget is around $2,000 to start so for right now the full frame option just wont work. I am now just not sure if I get the longer reach of the 15-85 or the faster 17-55. If I do the 17-55 that will leave a hole when I upgrade down the road to the 70-200. Thanks for all the great info everyone!

  7. #7
    Preeb is offline dPS Forum Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by shawman View Post
    I do have 35 mm experience and that is what is causing me the dilemma. I know what size lens will give me certain results so going with the crop body I have to convert the size to 35 mm equivalent. My budget is around $2,000 to start so for right now the full frame option just wont work. I am now just not sure if I get the longer reach of the 15-85 or the faster 17-55. If I do the 17-55 that will leave a hole when I upgrade down the road to the 70-200. Thanks for all the great info everyone!
    I can tell you from experience that the 15 mm from 55 to 70 isn't a huge deal. I did add the 60mm, but that was as much for the macro as for filling a gap. 15 mm is a much bigger void at the wide end. I find that by far my most used lens is the 17-55.
    Rick

    Canon 60D; EF-S 10-22 f3.5-f4.5 USM; EF-S 17-55 f2.8 USM; EF-S 60mm f2.8 Macro; EF100mm f2.8 L IS Macro USM; EF 70-200 f4 L IS USM + 1.4x II TC --- Soon to have: Fuji Finepix XP 200 Waterproof

  8. #8
    Doug Pardee is offline Not photogenic
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    Quote Originally Posted by shawman View Post
    I do have 35 mm experience and that is what is causing me the dilemma. I know what size lens will give me certain results so going with the crop body I have to convert the size to 35 mm equivalent.
    That's the least of your problems. You'll very quickly learn to make the conversions, then to think directly in terms of the APS-C focal lengths. If you can't make this simple transition, you've got a lot of rough road ahead of you!

    Nowadays we almost all use zoom lenses anyway, so it really doesn't much matter. I rarely give any thought to what focal length I'm using. I just zoom in or out to achieve the framing that I want.

  9. #9
    veritasimagery is offline I'm one of "those" people
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    I would agree with Tzetsin on the recommendation to look beyond the T2i to the T3i or even the 60D. Not only will you gain the articulated screen that is very handy, but you also gain wireless flash built-in. And since the T3i is only around $100 US more than the T2i in a great deal.

    As far as going full frame, you won't regret spending on the EF and EF-L lenses, whether you upgrade to full frame or not.
    Kevin
    Canon EOS 60D, Canon EOS T3i, Canon A-1, Canon AE-1 Program, Various lenses
    http://500px.com/VeritasImageryNW/photos
    http://veritasimagerynw.smugmug.com/

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