Cover Your Eyepiece - Digital Photography School
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Cover Your Eyepiece

Take a look at your DSLR camera strap. If you are using the strap that came with your camera, you might notice a little piece of plastic or rubber on one side of the strap. Have you ever wondered what that was for? (If the answer is “No” then it might still be sitting your camera box!)

That device serves a simple purpose that I’d guess 95% of DSLR photographers never consider. Its sole purpose is to cover the eyepiece on your camera and most photographers have never used it, though it can be useful. Even without using that actual device, covering your eyepiece, when your face is not already covering it, can be helpful to gaining proper exposure.

The problem comes from the fact that your camera’s light meter is deciding what your shutter speed, aperture and other settings will be. If you are shooting in Manual, this will not be an issue. Also, if you are shooting in LiveView, this will also likely not be an issue. And here’s a quick drawing of why and how taken from a post on my blog entitled “How Your Camera Works“. (Red is the sensor, Blue are the shutter curtains, Green is the mirror, Yellow is the aperture, Orange are the lens elements, Purple is the focus screen and Black is the pentiprism).

Light typically comes into your camera from the front lens and does all that fancy bouncing before getting to your eye. Sometimes the light meter in your camera is located just before the eyepiece and sometimes it is located just behind your semi-translucent mirror, if you have such a mirror. Either way, it is located in the light path.

The problem is light can travel in your eyepiece as well as out of it. Now the amount of light hitting your meter is increased, changes your meter settings and thus your exposure settings in Auto, Program, Shutter and Aperture Modes (and likely in the other “Scene” modes as well). This might be only a minor change or something more nefarious.

To demonstrate, I shot some samples in broad daylight to start. The first sample set is with the sun at my back but high in the sky, with the camera and target both parallel to the ground. This is a likely scenario for most shots.

The first shot, with my eye in front of the eyepiece, has settings of ISO 100, f/5.6 and 1/500. The second shot is only slightly off of that when I moved away from the eyepiece; ISO 100, f/5.6 and 1/800.

Next, the same shots except this time I set the camera up so it is directly in line with the sun and the target. The first shot is with my eye in front of the eyepiece, then I am off to the side and finally, in the third image I am standing about one foot behind the camera, shading it but not holding my eye up to it.

The shot data for each image is ISO 100 and aperture of f/5.6. The shutter speeds vary from 1/250 to 1/5000 to 1/500, respectively. This means if the camera is set to expose properly when my eye is in front of the eyepiece, then with direct sunlight hitting the same eyepiece, it will under expose by 4 1/4 stops. Even just standing back from the camera results in a full stop more light being metered.

Finally I took some shots of a cat. His name is Mocha. He’s a cranky cat but once in a while he sits still. This shot is inside with less rigor in regards to the test. There are large windows behind me and the sun is off to the side of the windows. It is a cloudy day with tons off diffused light, also coming in through a skylight. See if you can guess which shot is which.

The data: First shot ISO 2000, f/4.5 and 1/160. Second shot ISO 2000, f/4.5 and 1/1250. That’s a three stop difference in a diffused light situation.

Even if you don’t use the supplied eyepiece cover (which usually requires removing the attached eyepiece), be cautious of the light entering the back of your camera. It could be the reason why some of your photos are coming out dark.

EDIT: As some requested, here is another photographer’s photo of the eyepiece cover I am speaking about. http://www.flickr.com/photos/hpulley/4830737083/ I am traveling at the moment and do not have my cover with me.

Read more from our Tips & Tutorials category.

Peter West Carey is a world traveling photographer who now is spending a large amount of time going back through 6 years of travel photo and processing them like he should have to start with. He is also helping others learn about photography with the free series 31+ Days Of Photography Experiments which builds off of the 31+ Days To Better Photography series on his blog.

  • http://www.edwalkerphotography.com Ed Walker

    I have absolutely no idea what this is about.

    Call me simplistic, but maybe you should take a photo of it so we can see what the hell you are talking about.

  • http://saccadics.wordpress.com/2011/06/02/roma-caput-mundi/ Mihai

    good tips ;)
    I, as an M shooter I don’t get this kind of trouble, but on the rarest of occasion when I do shot on auto I’ll keep your tips in mind!

  • http://richardbegone.posterous.com Richard Harrison

    I know exactly what you’re talking about – because I read the manual. But I also shoot almost exclusively on manual so rarely encounter this issue. Good explanation though. Thanks!

    Er, Ed has a point :)

  • http://blogs.gonomad.com/traveltalesfromindia/ Mridula

    Me too had a no idea what that piece attached to the strap was! Thanks for the tip.

  • http://jerodschaefer.com Jerod

    Thanks for this! I know to use the cover or shoot in LV when using a remote but I had no idea it could have that dramatic of an effect!

    BTW – I also have a Siamese named Mocha.

    TFS!

  • English Geek

    No idea why Ed there doesn’t know what you are talking about–this is a great article. I had no idea that light entering through the eyepiece could change anything, so I am very glad to read your article.
    Thanks!

  • James

    Very good article. I have heard of this being an issue, sometimes, but never tested the effects. Have looked into after market eye pieces for my camera but have not taken the plunge yet, mainly because my pics have not been an issue. At least nothing post processing can’t handle, or the recycle bin.. lol!

    Again, thank you for spending the time writing an informative article.

  • retlaw7

    I’m with Ed!

  • http://www.kerstenbeck.com Erik Kerstenbeck

    Hi

    This is a really good explaination why one should take the time either to cover up the eyepiece or use live view. This is super critical when shooting long exposures. Examples would be light trails (night or dusk photography) or trying to get that smokey water look using long expposures or a Neutral Density filter.

    For this shot (around 6 sec) I covered up the eye piece. It takes a bit more time and one more step in the execution, but taking ones time is key to a good shot!

    http://kerstenbeckphotoart.wordpress.com/2011/05/04/smoke-on-the-water/

  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/gipukan Gipukan

    When your shooting infrared with your dslr you need to put it on the viewfinder to not spoil your long exposure time.

  • Lars

    I would also like to know what you’re talking about. I know there was a plastic strip on my camera strap, I removed it because it was in the way. However, I don’t see what that piece of plastic can do that the strap itself can’t. And cover how, apart from badly?

  • http://midnightrook.blogspot.com Jean-Pierre

    I learned this the hard way with my my film camera. Took two or three rolls before I noticed the change in the viewfinder. Helpful article!

  • ScottC

    A very good point (bought my camera used and the eyepeice cover wasn’t delivered!).

    I’ve been using my hand to cover the eyepiece since….

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/lendog64/5380341012/

  • http://www.whitesmotorcycles.com Mike

    Since I do not have the original strap how about posting a photo of what you have described. Thanks

  • http://justanothergirlwithacamera.blogspot.com/ Tiffany in Topeka

    Wow! I haven’t heard this before – thank you SO much!!! I have wondered what that little extra flap was for… I just figured it had something to do with the strap itself. Glad I haven’t decided to do something drastic like get rid of it. I will start using it now! :)

    Thank you for the photo examples and the data – it really drove home the point of how important this is.

    ~Tiffany

  • http://www.livinglikethekings.com Kat @ Living Like the Kings

    I need to go dig through my box… I hope I saved it!

  • http://www.jwmanning.com Jim M.

    I’m not sure I understand the function of the eyepiece cover either. When do I use it? I can’t in normal mode, since it covers my view. When my camera (Sony A330) is in LV mode, it automatically covers it with a curtain.

  • http://thecareyadventures.com/blog Peter West Carey

    I have edited the post to include a link to this photographer’s picture of the cover http://www.flickr.com/photos/hpulley/4830737083/
    I am currently traveling without my cover. I do appreciate irony.

  • http://www.robdphotos.smugmug.com PB PM

    Some higher end cameras have built in eye piece curtain, so much nicer than those rubber or plastic ones that come with entry level cameras.

  • oliverignacio

    covering the eyepiece is very important when doing long exposures. this is the only time when I cover the eyepiece

  • oliverignacio

    … and btw, I don’t use the black rubber… I just use handkerchief or something that is easy to place and remove on the eyepiece

  • Becster

    went straight out to the shed… yes sure enough there is was being neglected in the camera box… thank you!

  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/dlthibo/ Dennis Thibodeaux

    I read about this in my manual when I first received my camera. The problem I have is I have to take the normal soft rubber guard that stays over the eyepiece off to use the temporary eyepiece cover. So when I take long exposures I make sure and find a way to block any light entering the eyepiece.

  • Barry Scully

    Did anyone notice that in the bunny diagram the light tracings from the feet and head of the bunny end up not tracing to a right side up bunny in the viewfinder?

    Good article, I have been asked why I was covering up the viewfinder quite a few times in the last year or so.

  • Steve (oz_ollie)

    Good article and good reminder to use “Live View” tomorrow morning when I head out before dawn to shoot the lunar eclipse! Good to some photos that are great demonstrations of the author’s points.

  • http://www.metarazzi.com Jeff Carter

    Back in the mid-80′s when I got my first SLR (Canon T-70), indeed there was one of these rubber covers on the camera strap. I knew what it was as soon as I saw it and thought to myself “bonus!” Alas, I’ve never used one. I shoot in manual when doing portraits and when in aperture priority I usually have my eye behind the eyepiece and will use exposure compensation as necessary (or will adjust my RAW images in post-edit).

    Kudos to you for bringing this up! It’s something that is not usually pointed out in detail in user manuals or by mentors and easily gets overlooked, especially by beginners. I imagine that the eyepiece shutter will become standard on dSLRs.

  • http://www.lafango.com/epk/fortunato_uno fortunato_uno

    First let me ask, Whats with the hair cut? :-)

    Ok enough sillyness. I wanted to mention, I actually do my initial setting using the light coming threw the eye piece. I know that sounds wierd. What I do when I come to an event that I might have differing light, is to hold the camera away from me to get the initial setting. I know the light comes in from the eye piece, so I use the ambiant light to give me a basic metering for the general surroundings. I’l make some tweeks while I shoot, but usually only minor ones. I don’t know if that works when not shooting in manual, but it works.

  • Flo

    This is especially valuable advice if you shoot infra red. The light coming in the eyepiece will create a hot spot right smack dab in the middle of the IR image and ruin the shot.

  • http://www.bvcphoto.com B

    Just so I understand the article, all of the test shots were done in a mode other than manual? Aperture priority I guess? And those were the shutter speeds the metering program chose?

    What I really don’t understand is the frist pair of examples, 1/500 sec to 1/800 sec is around 2/3 of a stop less exposure, but if anything the second image looks a bit lighter.

  • Tiberman Sajiwan Ramyead

    Even as a beginner I couldn’t agree more with Peter’s advice and tips. In fact when shooting on the beach under bright early morning sunlight, along with the gorgeous colours which my little island home (Mauritius) offers, I have ended up with shots lacking luminance. Last week I used the viewfinder cap – it made a difference. The eye next to the viewfinder may still allow light to creep in.

  • jeorf

    Wow, thanks for this. Mine’s in my box. It would be lovely if it can go on the strap. Pretty much if I’m not holding the camera up to my eye I’m using live view or manual but I will definitely keep this in mind.

  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/photoskipper/ Photoskipper

    most of DSLR did not come with the eye-piece cover any more. My 6 years 300D (Rebel), 4 years old 5D and 2 years old 5D MkII has no eye-piece cover. I am using the old piece from 15 years old film SLR.
    Majority of causal shooters do not aware the importance of the cover piece as they shoot with their eyes on the eye-piece. Once they use Bulb, remote shutter or timer, they will appreciate the use the eye-cover.

  • E Wheeler

    I use soft dark foam that usually comes with computer equipment. I cut out small rectangles that are a little larger than the viewfinder to hold it in place. Once the shot is setup, I just pop it in the viewfinder and all is right with the world. :) I keep a small zip-lock bag of them in my camera bag. I tried using the cover on the strap but found it to be to much of a hassle.

  • Rodney Davis

    I find it particularly useful when doing self portraits using the camera’s self-timer. Depending on the situation, sometimes I don’t want to use live view before running back into the scene. If you’re shooting in RAW and there’s lots of daylight, you can always adjust things later, but why not get as perfect a shot as possible anyway. When lighting conditions are less than optimum, its even more useful.

  • http://www.whitepetal.co.uk Paul

    Interesting article, not something most of us would consider?

  • http://schwarzenfeldphotography.com/ Paul vS

    You could cover it with your thumb and dial in the AE-lock in case you need to take your thumb away.

  • neuroanatomist

    I use a BlackRapid strap, and consequently my eyepiece covers are not conveniently attached. However, it’s not a big deal to me. In situations where my eye is not blocking the light entering the viewfinder, the camera is on a tripod. So, I simply hang the lens cap over the rubber eyecup, and that deos the trick.

  • Wendy

    yes, I thought it was very ironic that you write this article, then go travelling without your cover!
    I read my manual when I got my camera, so I knew about this, but I never use it as I rarely shoot in anything but manual. I still appreciate the explanation and the sample shots, it’s an easy thing to overlook unless you use it often.

  • Hugo

    I encountered this very problem today while shooting. At first i was using the eye-piece, I then decided to try the live-view mode, shooting the exact same subject from the same position and wondered why the heck my camera was changing the exposure settings! Thanks for the info!

  • wal

    i used to use that eye pice.. but the hassle of using it, just outweigh the functionality of it… better use in manual or.. use your face to cover the viewfinder.

  • Julie brown

    Thanks so much for the eyepiece article. I never knew that.

  • http://www.cindi-withaneye.com cindi with an eye

    HOLY COW, I never knew that this happened in auto mode. So good to know. Thanks for the examples of each exposure as well I wouldn’t have thought it made such a difference!

  • mark

    id left mine back in the camera box! but found that a spare SD card slotted nicely into the cup to do the same job! not much use for compact flash users tho! ;-)

    mark

  • Viraj

    Would holding a flashlight or a laser pointer to the eyepiece while exposing cause any cool effects (or even just better exposure in low light situations?)

  • Tiberman Sajiwan Ramyead

    Hi E Wheeler – I now improvise in the same manner, except that the foam has been cut out of my wife’s jewelry box! She hasn’t noticed yet.

  • http://www.fuzzypig.com George Johnson

    I knew exactly what you were talking about but I’ve never seen such a vivid example of the difference it makes! I only use manual when I need bulb for the ultra long exposures of sea, all other times I use aperature priority, easy to get lazy and say you’ll fix it later. I use a very large eye cup that moulds to my eye when I look through, I think I might follow one of the previous posters and cut out some small bits of black foam to push into the eye-cup from now on, stop some of that light leaking in!

  • http://guillermodelamaza.com Guillermo de la Maza

    That’ll prolly be the case with Canon, Minolta (Sony?) and maybe other brands, but none of my nikons have the viewfinder cover attached to their straps. If you decide to cover them up, you gotta replace the viewfinder’s rubber eyepiece with the provided accesory.

    I’ve found it best to use my black wallet to cover it instead!

  • David Ziff

    Why don’t you have to cover the viewfinder when in live view? Isn’t the light still leaking in through the viewfinder whether in live view or not?

Some older comments

  • David Ziff

    May 9, 2012 07:43 am

    Why don't you have to cover the viewfinder when in live view? Isn't the light still leaking in through the viewfinder whether in live view or not?

  • Guillermo de la Maza

    July 17, 2011 06:11 am

    That'll prolly be the case with Canon, Minolta (Sony?) and maybe other brands, but none of my nikons have the viewfinder cover attached to their straps. If you decide to cover them up, you gotta replace the viewfinder's rubber eyepiece with the provided accesory.

    I've found it best to use my black wallet to cover it instead!

  • George Johnson

    July 8, 2011 11:01 pm

    I knew exactly what you were talking about but I've never seen such a vivid example of the difference it makes! I only use manual when I need bulb for the ultra long exposures of sea, all other times I use aperature priority, easy to get lazy and say you'll fix it later. I use a very large eye cup that moulds to my eye when I look through, I think I might follow one of the previous posters and cut out some small bits of black foam to push into the eye-cup from now on, stop some of that light leaking in!

  • Tiberman Sajiwan Ramyead

    July 8, 2011 02:52 am

    Hi E Wheeler - I now improvise in the same manner, except that the foam has been cut out of my wife's jewelry box! She hasn't noticed yet.

  • Viraj

    July 7, 2011 05:02 am

    Would holding a flashlight or a laser pointer to the eyepiece while exposing cause any cool effects (or even just better exposure in low light situations?)

  • mark

    June 22, 2011 12:01 am

    id left mine back in the camera box! but found that a spare SD card slotted nicely into the cup to do the same job! not much use for compact flash users tho! ;-)

    mark

  • cindi with an eye

    June 21, 2011 05:51 am

    HOLY COW, I never knew that this happened in auto mode. So good to know. Thanks for the examples of each exposure as well I wouldn't have thought it made such a difference!

  • Julie brown

    June 20, 2011 08:24 pm

    Thanks so much for the eyepiece article. I never knew that.

  • wal

    June 19, 2011 02:50 pm

    i used to use that eye pice.. but the hassle of using it, just outweigh the functionality of it... better use in manual or.. use your face to cover the viewfinder.

  • Hugo

    June 19, 2011 03:39 am

    I encountered this very problem today while shooting. At first i was using the eye-piece, I then decided to try the live-view mode, shooting the exact same subject from the same position and wondered why the heck my camera was changing the exposure settings! Thanks for the info!

  • Wendy

    June 18, 2011 02:05 pm

    yes, I thought it was very ironic that you write this article, then go travelling without your cover!
    I read my manual when I got my camera, so I knew about this, but I never use it as I rarely shoot in anything but manual. I still appreciate the explanation and the sample shots, it's an easy thing to overlook unless you use it often.

  • neuroanatomist

    June 18, 2011 04:16 am

    I use a BlackRapid strap, and consequently my eyepiece covers are not conveniently attached. However, it's not a big deal to me. In situations where my eye is not blocking the light entering the viewfinder, the camera is on a tripod. So, I simply hang the lens cap over the rubber eyecup, and that deos the trick.

  • Paul vS

    June 18, 2011 02:33 am

    You could cover it with your thumb and dial in the AE-lock in case you need to take your thumb away.

  • Paul

    June 17, 2011 07:41 pm

    Interesting article, not something most of us would consider?

  • Rodney Davis

    June 17, 2011 12:42 pm

    I find it particularly useful when doing self portraits using the camera's self-timer. Depending on the situation, sometimes I don't want to use live view before running back into the scene. If you're shooting in RAW and there's lots of daylight, you can always adjust things later, but why not get as perfect a shot as possible anyway. When lighting conditions are less than optimum, its even more useful.

  • E Wheeler

    June 17, 2011 11:15 am

    I use soft dark foam that usually comes with computer equipment. I cut out small rectangles that are a little larger than the viewfinder to hold it in place. Once the shot is setup, I just pop it in the viewfinder and all is right with the world. :) I keep a small zip-lock bag of them in my camera bag. I tried using the cover on the strap but found it to be to much of a hassle.

  • Photoskipper

    June 17, 2011 10:11 am

    most of DSLR did not come with the eye-piece cover any more. My 6 years 300D (Rebel), 4 years old 5D and 2 years old 5D MkII has no eye-piece cover. I am using the old piece from 15 years old film SLR.
    Majority of causal shooters do not aware the importance of the cover piece as they shoot with their eyes on the eye-piece. Once they use Bulb, remote shutter or timer, they will appreciate the use the eye-cover.

  • jeorf

    June 17, 2011 06:47 am

    Wow, thanks for this. Mine's in my box. It would be lovely if it can go on the strap. Pretty much if I'm not holding the camera up to my eye I'm using live view or manual but I will definitely keep this in mind.

  • Tiberman Sajiwan Ramyead

    June 17, 2011 04:38 am

    Even as a beginner I couldn't agree more with Peter's advice and tips. In fact when shooting on the beach under bright early morning sunlight, along with the gorgeous colours which my little island home (Mauritius) offers, I have ended up with shots lacking luminance. Last week I used the viewfinder cap - it made a difference. The eye next to the viewfinder may still allow light to creep in.

  • B

    June 17, 2011 03:42 am

    Just so I understand the article, all of the test shots were done in a mode other than manual? Aperture priority I guess? And those were the shutter speeds the metering program chose?

    What I really don't understand is the frist pair of examples, 1/500 sec to 1/800 sec is around 2/3 of a stop less exposure, but if anything the second image looks a bit lighter.

  • Flo

    June 17, 2011 03:19 am

    This is especially valuable advice if you shoot infra red. The light coming in the eyepiece will create a hot spot right smack dab in the middle of the IR image and ruin the shot.

  • fortunato_uno

    June 16, 2011 11:22 am

    First let me ask, Whats with the hair cut? :-)

    Ok enough sillyness. I wanted to mention, I actually do my initial setting using the light coming threw the eye piece. I know that sounds wierd. What I do when I come to an event that I might have differing light, is to hold the camera away from me to get the initial setting. I know the light comes in from the eye piece, so I use the ambiant light to give me a basic metering for the general surroundings. I'l make some tweeks while I shoot, but usually only minor ones. I don't know if that works when not shooting in manual, but it works.

  • Jeff Carter

    June 16, 2011 01:42 am

    Back in the mid-80's when I got my first SLR (Canon T-70), indeed there was one of these rubber covers on the camera strap. I knew what it was as soon as I saw it and thought to myself "bonus!" Alas, I've never used one. I shoot in manual when doing portraits and when in aperture priority I usually have my eye behind the eyepiece and will use exposure compensation as necessary (or will adjust my RAW images in post-edit).

    Kudos to you for bringing this up! It's something that is not usually pointed out in detail in user manuals or by mentors and easily gets overlooked, especially by beginners. I imagine that the eyepiece shutter will become standard on dSLRs.

  • Steve (oz_ollie)

    June 15, 2011 11:31 pm

    Good article and good reminder to use "Live View" tomorrow morning when I head out before dawn to shoot the lunar eclipse! Good to some photos that are great demonstrations of the author's points.

  • Barry Scully

    June 15, 2011 10:30 pm

    Did anyone notice that in the bunny diagram the light tracings from the feet and head of the bunny end up not tracing to a right side up bunny in the viewfinder?

    Good article, I have been asked why I was covering up the viewfinder quite a few times in the last year or so.

  • Dennis Thibodeaux

    June 15, 2011 08:25 pm

    I read about this in my manual when I first received my camera. The problem I have is I have to take the normal soft rubber guard that stays over the eyepiece off to use the temporary eyepiece cover. So when I take long exposures I make sure and find a way to block any light entering the eyepiece.

  • Becster

    June 15, 2011 02:27 pm

    went straight out to the shed... yes sure enough there is was being neglected in the camera box... thank you!

  • oliverignacio

    June 15, 2011 01:35 pm

    ... and btw, I don't use the black rubber... I just use handkerchief or something that is easy to place and remove on the eyepiece

  • oliverignacio

    June 15, 2011 01:32 pm

    covering the eyepiece is very important when doing long exposures. this is the only time when I cover the eyepiece

  • PB PM

    June 15, 2011 07:31 am

    Some higher end cameras have built in eye piece curtain, so much nicer than those rubber or plastic ones that come with entry level cameras.

  • Peter West Carey

    June 15, 2011 06:14 am

    I have edited the post to include a link to this photographer's picture of the cover http://www.flickr.com/photos/hpulley/4830737083/
    I am currently traveling without my cover. I do appreciate irony.

  • Jim M.

    June 15, 2011 05:12 am

    I'm not sure I understand the function of the eyepiece cover either. When do I use it? I can't in normal mode, since it covers my view. When my camera (Sony A330) is in LV mode, it automatically covers it with a curtain.

  • Kat @ Living Like the Kings

    June 15, 2011 05:06 am

    I need to go dig through my box... I hope I saved it!

  • Tiffany in Topeka

    June 15, 2011 04:27 am

    Wow! I haven't heard this before - thank you SO much!!! I have wondered what that little extra flap was for... I just figured it had something to do with the strap itself. Glad I haven't decided to do something drastic like get rid of it. I will start using it now! :)

    Thank you for the photo examples and the data - it really drove home the point of how important this is.

    ~Tiffany

  • Mike

    June 15, 2011 04:03 am

    Since I do not have the original strap how about posting a photo of what you have described. Thanks

  • ScottC

    June 15, 2011 03:59 am

    A very good point (bought my camera used and the eyepeice cover wasn't delivered!).

    I've been using my hand to cover the eyepiece since....

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/lendog64/5380341012/

  • Jean-Pierre

    June 15, 2011 03:55 am

    I learned this the hard way with my my film camera. Took two or three rolls before I noticed the change in the viewfinder. Helpful article!

  • Lars

    June 15, 2011 03:34 am

    I would also like to know what you're talking about. I know there was a plastic strip on my camera strap, I removed it because it was in the way. However, I don't see what that piece of plastic can do that the strap itself can't. And cover how, apart from badly?

  • Gipukan

    June 15, 2011 03:21 am

    When your shooting infrared with your dslr you need to put it on the viewfinder to not spoil your long exposure time.

  • Erik Kerstenbeck

    June 15, 2011 03:02 am

    Hi

    This is a really good explaination why one should take the time either to cover up the eyepiece or use live view. This is super critical when shooting long exposures. Examples would be light trails (night or dusk photography) or trying to get that smokey water look using long expposures or a Neutral Density filter.

    For this shot (around 6 sec) I covered up the eye piece. It takes a bit more time and one more step in the execution, but taking ones time is key to a good shot!

    http://kerstenbeckphotoart.wordpress.com/2011/05/04/smoke-on-the-water/

  • retlaw7

    June 15, 2011 02:50 am

    I'm with Ed!

  • James

    June 15, 2011 02:49 am

    Very good article. I have heard of this being an issue, sometimes, but never tested the effects. Have looked into after market eye pieces for my camera but have not taken the plunge yet, mainly because my pics have not been an issue. At least nothing post processing can't handle, or the recycle bin.. lol!

    Again, thank you for spending the time writing an informative article.

  • English Geek

    June 15, 2011 01:48 am

    No idea why Ed there doesn't know what you are talking about--this is a great article. I had no idea that light entering through the eyepiece could change anything, so I am very glad to read your article.
    Thanks!

  • Jerod

    June 15, 2011 01:48 am

    Thanks for this! I know to use the cover or shoot in LV when using a remote but I had no idea it could have that dramatic of an effect!

    BTW - I also have a Siamese named Mocha.

    TFS!

  • Mridula

    June 15, 2011 01:25 am

    Me too had a no idea what that piece attached to the strap was! Thanks for the tip.

  • Richard Harrison

    June 15, 2011 01:18 am

    I know exactly what you're talking about - because I read the manual. But I also shoot almost exclusively on manual so rarely encounter this issue. Good explanation though. Thanks!

    Er, Ed has a point :)

  • Mihai

    June 15, 2011 01:09 am

    good tips ;)
    I, as an M shooter I don't get this kind of trouble, but on the rarest of occasion when I do shot on auto I'll keep your tips in mind!

  • Ed Walker

    June 15, 2011 01:04 am

    I have absolutely no idea what this is about.

    Call me simplistic, but maybe you should take a photo of it so we can see what the hell you are talking about.

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