7 Tips for Attending a Photo Walk

7 Tips for Attending a Photo Walk

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As a photographer, you might have noticed that photo walks are all the rage these days. Whether it’s an event run through meetup.com or eventbrite.com, or a more involved workshop from a teacher that you follow, photo walks are one of the best ways to see a place and to improve your photography.

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NYC photo walk featuring dPS Managing Editor Darlene as my guest (I’m in the front row with the hat, she’s in blue with a hat on my right).

Classroom and reading time are very important for improving, but nothing can replace the act of learning while you are out there photographing. This is where all the things you’ve learned come together and finally stick in your head. It is also the most fun way to learn.

So if you haven’t already, I suggest that you start seeking photo walks out, and here are some tips to help when you do.

1. Use them as an excuse to meet other photographers

Photo Walk

One of the main advantages to photo walks is that you are surrounded by like-minded people with similar passions. I don’t know about you, but most of my family and friends from growing up are not very into photography. So I try to find new photography friends whenever I can, but it can be tough to do that. Photo walks solve this problem.

Introduce yourself, exchange information, and talk about possibly going out to shoot again. You can take your favorite few people from each walk and start building an awesome network of photographers to go out shooting with in the future.

If you have questions, by all means, ask the organizers of the walk, but also see what the other people attending think. This is a chance to learn from many unique perspectives. Photography is a subject where there can be many correct, but differing answers to a question or problem, and it’s good to hear multiple opinions.

2. Watch what other people are photographing

Photo Walk

You are there to have fun and learn, and sometimes a great way to learn in this environment is to watch the other photographers and see what they are attracted to. Just from teaching on photo walks for the last five years, I have found so many new interesting ways to capture the city by watching my students. I have walked down certain blocks hundreds of times and then suddenly someone will capture it in a way that I had never thought of. It is an incredible way to learn.

3. Shoot on your own occasionally

New York Photo Walk

That being said, mix it up and take some time to break off and shoot on your own. You have the advantage here to learn from so many others, but at the same time you want to capture your own, unique photographs, and you need some quiet to do that. Step away a handful of times during the walk, but make sure not to get lost or slow down the group. After that, you can reengage with everyone else.

4. Get out of your comfort zone

New York Photo Walk

This is a chance to do something you are not used to doing. If you are a street photographer and are on a street photography meet up, of course, that is what you will be focusing on. But if you are a landscape photographer, consider doing some street photography, and if you are a street photographer, consider trying more landscapes. Do some portraiture. Improve your lighting. There are photo walks for nearly everything.

Seek out photo walks that will cover your interests and others that will challenge them. Everyone has their likes and dislikes, but this is a great chance to seek new perspectives and to round out your abilities.

5. Learn about the area beforehand

Photo Walk, New York City

Some photo walk leaders will talk about the history of the neighborhood, while others will strictly focus on the photography. Both are great ways of running workshops, but history is very important to photography. It helps to inform what you are shooting and to improve your awareness of the place.

Take some time on your own to read up about the area. Learn about the history, and explore the work of photographers that frequent those areas. Come prepared with this knowledge and it will make your day even that much more successful. This knowledge is not only inspiring but it will improve your ability to notice those special moments that create a magnificent photograph. In addition, some of the other walk attendees may find this knowledge fascinating as well.

6. Organize one yourself

Photo Walk

As you continue to attend photo walks, build your network of local photographer friends and start shooting with them regularly. Once you all get to know each other this could become a very close group of friends. Keep in touch, build friendships, attend gallery events together, and share your work and ideas.

Having a close group that all know you and your work is the best way to get a proper critique. If you just ask anybody or share your work on the web, you never know what the person’s perspective is who is giving you the critique. Usually, they just say “beautiful!” With a close group, that perspective will grow between all of you and these friends will not be afraid to tell you when they do not like something.

7. Do not get run over by cars or bikes

Photo Walk, New York City

This is the hardest part of my job, so please help me and the other photo walk leaders out. When you are in a new place, photographing in a new way, or surrounded by competing stimuli and photographers walking around, your situational awareness can become distracted. People with their lens to their eye can suddenly walk backward into the street trying to get the correct perspective, but with no awareness of where they are and the dangers that could hurt them.

Always be careful and look before you make a sudden stop or a move sideways or backward. If you are using a tripod on the sidewalk or street, be careful about the tripod legs. Make sure they are no wider than the width of your body so that bikers won’t trip on them riding by you.

With a one-on-one workshop, I can do a good job at making sure people don’t make unwelcomed moves on the street, but with a large group it is out of my ability, so please watch out for both yourself and your fellow photo walkers.

Conclusion

Have you participated in any photo walks? Please share your experience and tips for them below.

Now go out and find some photo walks!

Read more from our Tips & Tutorials category

James Maher is a professional photographer based in New York, whose primary passion is documenting the personalities and stories of the city. If you are planning a trip to NYC, he is offering his new guide free to DPS readers, titled The New York Photographer's Travel Guide. James also runs New York Photography Tours and Street Photography Workshops and is the author of the e-book, The Essentials of Street Photography.

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  • I did my very first photo walk this month on World Wide Photo Walk day. My meetup group leader decided to host it this year and I was very excited to go. As we decided to explore Cocoa Village here in Florida. I had not previously been down in the area before and was happy to get to photograph the old architecture as well as the river and boardwalk areas.

  • i did my photowalk. I think one important thing is to start on time and also follow a discipline so that in minimum time maximum things can be done. Sometimes people come late and keep on calling the organiser.and there should be an agenda and certain expectation at the start of the photowalk..

  • Joy Krauthammer

    Shoot group photo toward beginning before group is more dispersed. Stop at a special, fun, colorful or serene location to take a group shot along way. Share the photos. I enjoy leading photo walks.

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  • Karen Wonders Hart

    My partner and I go on several photowalks with different groups each month. We have made some very good friends and always learn something. We also try to share with others less experienced in any group we attend – we all had to learn at some point. One of our groups does a monthly walk and then after we all meet at a local restaurant for some food, socializing and to share our photos (a laptop and small tv are brought so we can set up for viewing and everyone is encourage to shoot in both RAW and JPEG so we can share the JPEGs) Always interesting to see how different the photos of the same walk are

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