Rock Climbing Photography [Video and Tips]

0Comments

Building on our recent poll that explored whether readers are using the video feature on their cameras I thought today I’d share this video by Nikon and Australian rock climbing photographer Simon Carter – a video that was shot purely with the Nikon DS3.

For best viewing watch it in HD (press play, then quickly hit pause then select tthe 720p HD option in the menu instead of 360p.

In the next video Simon Carter shares some behind the scenes information on the shoot behind the above video as well as giving some general rock climbing photography tips.

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Darren Rowse is the editor and founder of Digital Photography School and SnapnDeals. He lives in Melbourne Australia and is also the editor of the ProBlogger Blog Tips. Follow him on Instagram, on Twitter at @digitalPS or on Google+.

  • Out here in Boulder, CO, rock climbing and outdoor photography are both huge!

    The advice given in those videos is priceless! Thanks for pointing them out, Darren (and for a unique post revealing an untapped niche out there!)

    Check out our Digital Camera Reviews

  • it`s a D3S not a DS3 😛
    about Simon Carter what can i say >? i love what he is doing!

  • Mike

    Simply an amazingly breath-taking and inspirational set of videos, information and techniques, both in the filming and photography aspects. Not to mention the pure love of the pursuit conveyed!

    Much thanks to Darren Rowse for posting such an awesome find (along with everything else you do) and obviously also a tremendous kudos to Simon Carter for all of the insights and inspiration!

    Always a thrill to see what the next visit here to DPS will hold..! Keep it comin’ !!! =D

  • Charlie

    My two favorite hobbies combined, that was an excellent dose of motivation for me, both the photography and climbing!

  • SJlarue

    That’s Just NUTS!! 😀

    I got the heebie-jeebies just watching him act like a spider on all the ropes and then he goes sometime I just push off…and then later on he’s changing lenses without any ground beneath him. :O Ugh!

  • I was almost dead during the video.

    Agree with sjlarue. =|

  • First, some very interesting and compelling imagery and very impressive work in the difficult-to-photograph world of rock climbing. (In another life I climbed semi-seriously far a few years, so I can relate to the physicality of the climbing and the other sensory aspects of the experience.)

    Despite the wonderful visual imagery, however, I have a concern. Before reading what I have to write about this, I recommend that viewers go back and watch the first video with the sound disabled.

    Back now? Good.

    You just had an experience that is closer to, but still quite a bit removed from, the actual experiences of climbing. There are moments of great intensity and fast motion, but there are far larger stretches of careful consideration and preparation and, on occasion, hanging around. There is a great feeling of connection to the rock itself and to the experience of being in and traveling across a very challenging natural space. And there are the sounds of clanking hardware and the voices of your partners.

    The choice of music (and music is what I do for a living mostly these days) is surprising. It is very dramatic music, the sort that might go with the right combat video game. It creates a sense of great stress and, even more, of being on a mission of heroic or even religious value. None of which is remotely close to the actual experience of climbing.

    Is this a bad thing? I’m not certain. But I am certain that in terms of telling us something real about the experiences that make climbing so compelling the music (and to some extent the imagery) take us to a very different and unrelated place.

    Take care,

    Dan

  • Totally stunning!

  • Matthew

    that was a fantastic find! thanks!! im a rock climber (been climbing for over 2 years) and love making films and photography, so that was epic! cheers

  • Matthew

    oh and @G Dan Mitchell thats a very good point! was thinking that my self!

  • Kent West

    Thanks Darren, great tips and further motivation to improve our passions (whatever they may be!).

  • Alain

    That gave me a good idea. I used to be a good climber, but I’m getting too old for this. HOWEVER, I can definitely “hang down” with younger friends and shoot them!
    ATougas

  • benjinot

    simon carter is (in my opinion) the best and most consistent climbing photographer in the world, his images are published in all of the best climbing magazines and with such a great and distintive style i can pretty much look at one of his photos and distinguish it from all others! particularly when he spends so much time in his own back yard, the blue mountains in NSW australia! to have so much prowess in such a niche and difficult field is amazing!

  • Wow! Very impessive, Does anyone care to take a guess on how much money this man makes from doing this? Just curious.

Some Older Comments

  • tabletopdrummer March 23, 2010 12:51 am

    Wow! Very impessive, Does anyone care to take a guess on how much money this man makes from doing this? Just curious.

  • benjinot March 19, 2010 11:47 am

    simon carter is (in my opinion) the best and most consistent climbing photographer in the world, his images are published in all of the best climbing magazines and with such a great and distintive style i can pretty much look at one of his photos and distinguish it from all others! particularly when he spends so much time in his own back yard, the blue mountains in NSW australia! to have so much prowess in such a niche and difficult field is amazing!

  • Alain March 19, 2010 11:29 am

    That gave me a good idea. I used to be a good climber, but I'm getting too old for this. HOWEVER, I can definitely "hang down" with younger friends and shoot them!
    ATougas

  • Kent West March 19, 2010 04:43 am

    Thanks Darren, great tips and further motivation to improve our passions (whatever they may be!).

  • Matthew March 16, 2010 05:21 am

    oh and @G Dan Mitchell thats a very good point! was thinking that my self!

  • Matthew March 16, 2010 05:19 am

    that was a fantastic find! thanks!! im a rock climber (been climbing for over 2 years) and love making films and photography, so that was epic! cheers

  • antwerpenR March 14, 2010 10:39 pm

    Totally stunning!

  • G Dan Mitchell March 14, 2010 03:11 am

    First, some very interesting and compelling imagery and very impressive work in the difficult-to-photograph world of rock climbing. (In another life I climbed semi-seriously far a few years, so I can relate to the physicality of the climbing and the other sensory aspects of the experience.)

    Despite the wonderful visual imagery, however, I have a concern. Before reading what I have to write about this, I recommend that viewers go back and watch the first video with the sound disabled.

    Back now? Good.

    You just had an experience that is closer to, but still quite a bit removed from, the actual experiences of climbing. There are moments of great intensity and fast motion, but there are far larger stretches of careful consideration and preparation and, on occasion, hanging around. There is a great feeling of connection to the rock itself and to the experience of being in and traveling across a very challenging natural space. And there are the sounds of clanking hardware and the voices of your partners.

    The choice of music (and music is what I do for a living mostly these days) is surprising. It is very dramatic music, the sort that might go with the right combat video game. It creates a sense of great stress and, even more, of being on a mission of heroic or even religious value. None of which is remotely close to the actual experience of climbing.

    Is this a bad thing? I'm not certain. But I am certain that in terms of telling us something real about the experiences that make climbing so compelling the music (and to some extent the imagery) take us to a very different and unrelated place.

    Take care,

    Dan

  • Narada Thomas March 14, 2010 02:25 am

    I was almost dead during the video.

    Agree with sjlarue. =|

  • SJlarue March 13, 2010 05:49 pm

    That's Just NUTS!! :D

    I got the heebie-jeebies just watching him act like a spider on all the ropes and then he goes sometime I just push off...and then later on he's changing lenses without any ground beneath him. :O Ugh!

  • Charlie March 13, 2010 12:47 pm

    My two favorite hobbies combined, that was an excellent dose of motivation for me, both the photography and climbing!

  • Mike March 13, 2010 06:49 am

    Simply an amazingly breath-taking and inspirational set of videos, information and techniques, both in the filming and photography aspects. Not to mention the pure love of the pursuit conveyed!

    Much thanks to Darren Rowse for posting such an awesome find (along with everything else you do) and obviously also a tremendous kudos to Simon Carter for all of the insights and inspiration!

    Always a thrill to see what the next visit here to DPS will hold..! Keep it comin' !!! =D

  • cipri March 13, 2010 06:26 am

    it`s a D3S not a DS3 :P
    about Simon Carter what can i say >? i love what he is doing!

  • Perry March 13, 2010 06:04 am

    Out here in Boulder, CO, rock climbing and outdoor photography are both huge!

    The advice given in those videos is priceless! Thanks for pointing them out, Darren (and for a unique post revealing an untapped niche out there!)

    Check out our Digital Camera Reviews

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