Photographing Bands in Bars, Part 2 – Set Up

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A guest post by Music Photographer Rick Bennett.

_Users_Darren_Downloads_bands-in-bars_bandsinbars2-a.jpgBand photography in bars can be very challenging, but with a little bit of knowledge and planning you can make images that blow away the standard fan photo. In Part 1, I discussed equipment choices: cameras, lenses and flashes. In this article, I’ll describe how to set up just before the performance to get the best shots.

First and foremost, you need to attempt to assess the security of your gear before you pull anything out. No band photographs are worth losing a camera or lens or flash over. The bands I’ve tended to shoot have played in nice neighborhoods in well established bars with well behaved clientele. But I’m constantly on the alert because the clientele could change in a heartbeat. In some situations, I’ll leave flashes and camera bags unattended, but I’ll never walk away from my camera. A VAL (voice activated light stand) can certainly help keep an eye on your gear, but the best place for the bag with extra gear is with the band’s gear, usually close to the stage. Having it close to their things means they’re more likely to help keep an eye on it as well. That being said, I’ve never had a problem with gear walking off, but that is something you’ll have to assess at every gig.

I generally try to find a seat (if they have seats) near to the front of the audience, left of center from the audience’s perspective. If there is an obvious front-row of fans, I’ll put my “home base” behind them since a) those fans would be the most irritated by a blocked view, and b) their excitement can make great framing devices. I choose left-of center because most guitar players are right handed, and I prefer pictures where the body of the guitar is closer to the camera. I want to be off-center because it generally results in better images of singers if the microphone doesn’t cover the lower half of their face. But this is just a “home base” where I’ll come back to in order to change lenses or enjoy some of the music. This is not where you’ll park your camera the whole performance. More on that in Part 3. After you’ve determined your home base, try to introduce yourself to the band, if this wasn’t arranged ahead of time. Get their permission to shoot their performance–I can’t imagine they would be upset by it, but it helps to build rapport by asking.

If you’re going to use off-camera flash, you’ll need to determine placement based on the layout of the bar. My standard layout is to work with two flashes, one at the extreme left of the stage, and the other at the extreme right. See this light diagram as an example. But again, it all depends on what you’ve got available to you for clamping/securing/mounting a flash. If I’m going to clamp a flash to something that the bar owns (and isn’t as simple as a chair or table or steel pole) I’ll check with a bartender or sound-guy first. I’ll let them know I’m there to shoot the band, and ask permission to mount a flash on their light-bar, for example. No one has ever given me grief, but its good to get permission first–asking forgiveness is not a good way to build your reputation. After I’ve placed the flash, I point the flash at the far side of the stage–this way the closest performer is in the “feathered” light, where the furthest performer gets the most direct blast, but at a much greater distance.

When shooting with two flashes, I generally set their triggers to different transmitter channels for the first set, and to the same channel for the second set. This gives me a wide variety of pictures–some with dramatic hard lighting, some with more balanced cross light.

Cross-lit with two off-camera flashes

Since I’m using manual flashes, I set my shutter speed to one click down from my max sync speed, which means I’m set to 1/160s. For the most part, this usually eliminates the stage lights, if any. I can always slow that down if I decide I want to let in more ambient or motion blur, but I start with 1/160s. Then I go to each of the positions of the band members, and if needed, place my hand about where their face would be, take a shot, chimp, repeat, until I determine the proper aperture for that performer. This ends up being pretty straight forward in a one-flash setting: the performer closest to the flash might be f/11, the next one might be f/8, then f/5.6 then f/4.8. I might write this down in a note pad, but usually I just get a feel for how “hot” the closest performer is, and knock the aperture down from there. If I can’t get enough light on the performer most distant from the flash, I’ll either increase the power on the flash or increase my ISO. I prefer to keep my flash power at 1/4 for fast recycle times, but that isn’t always possible because of the layout of the bar.

If you’re not using off-camera flash, I recommend setting your ISO to the highest setting you can tolerate based on the noise it produces, probably in the 800 to 3200 range. With my D60, I never went higher than 800 if I could help it. With my D5000, I can go all the way to 3200 with impunity. Next I’ll set the camera to spot metering, servo-continuous focusing, and aperture priority at the lowest setting for the lens. The D5000 (and other cameras I’m sure) can also enable “Auto ISO” where you specify the range of ISO that are acceptable (I’ll allow 200-3200) and the minimum shutter speed. The camera will then automatically boost your ISO as needed to match your given shutter speed. I’m still getting used to this feature, but I think it has the potential to really help in these kinds of situations. I’ll also set the camera to capture RAW+Basic JPEG. I save RAW and JPEG because the RAW files allow me to manipulate color balance better than JPEG, and the camera applies the best noise reduction to the JPEG.

To summarize, my camera settings generally look like this:

  • Off Camera Flash: Manual mode, 1/160s, aperture depends on performer distance to flash, ISO 200-800 if possible to get flash power set to 1/4. Metering mode doesn’t matter since I’m in manual mode.
  • Ambient Only: Aperture priority, smallest f-stop for lens, ISO high enough to get to 1/120s shutter speed, spot metering for close up shots, matrix metering for wide angle.

In part 3, I’ll cover shooting

Rick Bennett has been shooting bands in bars, at festivals, and on big stages for about a year. You can see more of his work on his blog, portfolio, or Flickr stream.

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  • Not long ago I got the opportunity to photography some DJ’s at a local club. Lots of fun. I preferred using no flash for my shots, gave much more of a ‘true’ feeling from the venue rather that a ‘cold’ look when I used the flash. Only trouble was I needed to slow the shutter speed so had an issue with shake. Check out the results …
    http://lindaphotoart.wordpress.com/?s=feel+the+beat&submit=Search

  • You mention the RAW file gives you most control over colour etc. and Jpeg gives best noise reduction.. does this mean you then chose between colour depth or noise reduction? I prefer shooting in just RAW, you an apply noise reduction afterwards and as a bonus you save space.

  • Noise reduction in JPEG is just a side-effect of the compression process. Don’t sweat it. You’ll JPEG it for the web or print where ink-bleed will smooth a little. Stick with RAW. It’ll give you a stop or so of leeway if you have to drag back blown highlights.

  • the camera applies better noise reduction than Lightroom? Please clarify.

  • i’ve shot several bands in bars. I shoot in RAW without flash. Usually, I can get away with ISO 800. The lighting determines my lens choice. I used to shoot in Manual mode, but changing the shutter speed or aperture for each shot got old. Shooting in Av mode has become more the norm so I can up the exposure compensation if need be. I just recently started playing with the color temperature to achieve more accurate skin tones while keeping the stage lighting.
    Here are some examples – http://www.c-bphotography.com/Bands

  • taabitha

    The lighting diagram link is 404 – it’s mispelled (ligthing instead of lighting) in the link.

  • taabitha

    Dave, I shoot band shots in RAW for the opposite reason. It’s really rare that I’m dealing with blown highlights (shooting with available light) so I shoot in RAW so I can underexpose a stop or two when necessary (when the light is *really* dim and I’m already at my highest ISO) and then bring the shadows back up. Can’t do that with JPEG.

  • Sorry about the 404 on the light diagram. Fixed now.

  • One of the better tips there is standing left center to show more of the band with guitars. Great tip!

  • I think the JPEG with noise reduction is so you can quickly see how successful the shot is – note that she’s only shooting “Basic JPEG”, so she’s not using those as end-result.

  • You mention using a flash. If you are shooting local bands in a bar this may be possible. Almost every concert or touring act I’ve ever shot does not allow flash photography. This makes it even more difficult to get the exposure correct and make sure you have a fast enough shutter speed to stop the motion.

  • val

    .
    Great series. The lighting diagram shows camera right vs left. What did I miss?
    .

  • one thing disturbs me in the article: using the flash!
    for me using the flash means:
    1) you do not invest in your gear (to be able to shot in low-light environment…),
    2) you do not respect the artist (the flash can be very disturbing! just ask a few musician, before they throw you out…),
    3) you do not respect the audience (they paid to see the artist WITHOUT a disturbing flashlights…),
    4) you do not respect the other photographers working around (you can kill their pictures…)
    5) the flash kills the mood/atmosphere and you get flat/white pictures (like your samples…)

    in summary, leave the flash for the fans with compact cameras/mobile phones…
    sorry to say, but i am envy of you, if you get paid for this kind of concert/flash-photography…

  • @Richie
    1) In Part 1 I described flash vs glass as a tough choice. For me, it was a single step in investing in my gear. I now have a 70-200mm f/2.8.
    2) Perhaps this is considered disrespect in Hungary, but EVERY musician I’ve talked to (in USA) about it has told me it is not disturbing at all.
    3) Perhaps this is considered disrespect in Hungary, but every FAN I’ve talked to (in USA) about is has told me it is not disturbing at all.
    4) A flash duration of 1/1000 of a second has an incredibly low likelihood of affecting other photographers unless they are using seconds long exposures. And for the sake of the audience, I don’t shoot when another DSLR shooter is obviously taking pictures.
    5) On this point I’ll have to respectfully disagree with you. It can add color and crispness where otherwise there would be just noise and blur.

    The other point that perhaps isn’t obvious–I don’t shoot EXCLUSIVELY with flash. It depends on the venue and the look I’m attempting to attain. It is one tool that might be available. I also don’t shoot the whole performance with flash–I give it a break or change the lens to make sure I’m not irritating anyone because I do realize it is a possibility.

  • I kind of agree with Richie on all those points (though I really appreciate all the effort you’ve put into this series– LOVED part 1, can’t wait for part 3).

    As an infrequent bar-musician, I’ve gotten really frustrated with people flashing me with their nikon coolpix, even though if they asked permission, I’d tell them it’s ok (you don’t want to say no to a potential fan!).

    I also agree that the flash kills all the cool atmosphere that you get in venues– even venues with crappy/little stage lighting. What you gain in clarity you lose a hundred-fold in terms of interestingness. For example, that top photo might well have been posed in a studio or candidly. Without the aid of funky stage lighting, it’s hard to tell, oh this is definitely at a concert. The lighting (even, and maybe especially, poor lighting) really tells the viewer, “this was a concert, yes, it was awesome, and this was it. sucks to be you if you weren’t there.” I just don’t get that from concert pictures with a flash.

    And, please don’t take that as criticism– lord knows my over-processed fooling around with a DSLR in no way qualifies me to critique ANYone else’s work. It’s mostly a matter of taste, but I’d totally prefer a slightly blurry/underexposed shot with interesting lighting to a flash shot in this case.

    Thanks again for this series. I really hope you don’t take this as me harshing on any of it. I’ve learned quite a lot from you!

  • First off all.. Shooting bands in Bars for me sounds more like a shooting for promo or cover, not shooting a gig. For the ambient light shooting. Usualy stage has 2 set of lights. Front light (tungsten, static lights, pointed towards musicians), those do not change (only if they want total darknes, when changing guitars ect.) And back lights which usualy have effects or filters on, and are projected on a smoke screen. So why would you use a auto ISO if you have constant thungsten light on the performer? Just mearsure it at the begining, and thats it. In my oppinion your sample photos look flat, whit too much flash. Ther is no stage life on those photos. Maybe you selected wrong ones.

  • @Chris: thanks for the feedback. The difference between a remote flash and a coolpix flash is that you’re almost never looking at the remote flash because it isn’t anywhere near your field of vision. In fact, the guitar player in the second pic of part 3 said to me, upon seeing a print of that very pic “Wow! I didn’t realize it was that bright in there.” When I explained that I had used flash he was genuinely surprised, and hadn’t noticed.

    As for atmosphere, I totally agree, if there is atmosphere to be had. Remote flash is just one of the tools I use, in addition to f/1.8 and f/2.8 lenses, long shutter speeds, zoom effects, etc. Flash doesn’t always work for a shot, and likewise, I’ve found, ambient doesn’t always work either. But ultimately, I guess you’re correct, it is preference. I like the result of a bright, well lit shot. Next time I head out though, I’ll definitely try to capture more of the atmosphere.

    Thanks for the constructive comments.

  • Rick, from what I can read and see on your website you’re not that experienced concertphotographer. I’ve been doing this for 3 years (and maybe 100 shows). Everything from small swedish acts to for example Guns and Roses, Slayer or Depeche Mode.

    You talk about photographing in a pub. That is one thing. The lights can be nothing. But when you move up to even a small venue you have no chance to speak with the musicans. And the deal is almost always the first 3 songs and no flash.

    I agree that using a flash is giving more crisp but it doesn’t add color. It takes away the color that the stage-light uses. It shows what the show would be like in broad daylight.

    Here you can see how you use the light to show the feeling of the show..
    [eimg url=’http://konsertfoto.se/blog/wp-content/uploads/20070118-IMG_1726.jpg’ title=’20070118-IMG_1726.jpg’]

    [eimg url=’http://konsertfoto.se/blog/wp-content/uploads/20100206-IMG_9111.jpg’ title=’20100206-IMG_9111.jpg’]

    [eimg url=’http://allerby.com/dagens/wp-content/uploads/IMG_19261.jpg’ title=’IMG_19261.jpg’]

    and finaly, two drumshots

    [eimg url=’http://allerby.com/dagens/wp-content/uploads/20100717-00.14.40-IMG_0586.jpg’ title=’20100717-00.14.40-IMG_0586.jpg’]

    [eimg url=’http://allerby.com/dagens/wp-content/uploads/20100716-23.56.36-_MG_1174.jpg’ title=’20100716-23.56.36-_MG_1174.jpg’][eimg url=’http://konsertfoto.se/blog/wp-content/uploads/20091212-IMG_5584.jpg’ title=’20091212-IMG_5584.jpg’]

  • I’ve been working as a concert-photographer for 3 years with everything from small swedish bands to for example wu tang clan, guns n roses, depeche mode, slayer or slipknot.

    There’s one thing doing a shoot at a pub but even in the smallest venue the standard rule is “3 songs and no flash”.

    Maybe us is different but over here that’s how we do it. You got to find the emotions in the lightshow.

    [eimg url=’http://konsertfoto.se/blog/wp-content/uploads/20070118-IMG_1726.jpg’ title=’20070118-IMG_1726.jpg’]

    [eimg url=’http://konsertfoto.se/blog/wp-content/uploads/20091212-IMG_5584.jpg’ title=’20091212-IMG_5584.jpg’]

    [eimg url=’http://konsertfoto.se/blog/wp-content/uploads/20100416-IMG_4868.jpg’ title=’20100416-IMG_4868.jpg’]

  • @Chris: sorry, I thought I had replied to your comment… Thank you very much for explaining your perspective regarding interestingness. I’ll definitely take that into consideration the next time I’m out shooting.

  • Rachel

    I’m a photographer but I don’t do much band stuff. I was recently at a concert where I learnt first hand a great technique for shooting bands using a 70-200mm lens without a tripod – if you are tall, just rest it on the head of the person in front of you. In this case I was the person in front of the photographer. Not a word was said. He just did it. I was shocked but also found his brazen behavior so completely hilarious that I let him do it for a while – after all I did have a prime position.

    Just a tip for all the band photographers out there 😉

  • Mark

    This was an incredible tip. Very useful where the lighting is alway changing. Thank you.
    Auto ISO” where you specify the range of ISO that are acceptable (I’ll allow 200-3200) and the minimum shutter speed.

    Read more: https://digital-photography-school.com/photographing-bands-in-bars-part-2-–-set-up#ixzz0zX8jECw7

Some Older Comments

  • Mark September 15, 2010 05:24 am

    This was an incredible tip. Very useful where the lighting is alway changing. Thank you.
    Auto ISO” where you specify the range of ISO that are acceptable (I’ll allow 200-3200) and the minimum shutter speed.

    Read more: https://digital-photography-school.com/photographing-bands-in-bars-part-2-–-set-up#ixzz0zX8jECw7

  • Rachel August 27, 2010 01:10 pm

    I'm a photographer but I don't do much band stuff. I was recently at a concert where I learnt first hand a great technique for shooting bands using a 70-200mm lens without a tripod - if you are tall, just rest it on the head of the person in front of you. In this case I was the person in front of the photographer. Not a word was said. He just did it. I was shocked but also found his brazen behavior so completely hilarious that I let him do it for a while - after all I did have a prime position.

    Just a tip for all the band photographers out there ;)

  • Rick020200 August 27, 2010 12:26 pm

    @Chris: sorry, I thought I had replied to your comment... Thank you very much for explaining your perspective regarding interestingness. I'll definitely take that into consideration the next time I'm out shooting.

  • Oskar Allerby August 27, 2010 12:35 am

    I've been working as a concert-photographer for 3 years with everything from small swedish bands to for example wu tang clan, guns n roses, depeche mode, slayer or slipknot.

    There's one thing doing a shoot at a pub but even in the smallest venue the standard rule is "3 songs and no flash".

    Maybe us is different but over here that's how we do it. You got to find the emotions in the lightshow.

    [eimg url='http://konsertfoto.se/blog/wp-content/uploads/20070118-IMG_1726.jpg' title='20070118-IMG_1726.jpg']

    [eimg url='http://konsertfoto.se/blog/wp-content/uploads/20091212-IMG_5584.jpg' title='20091212-IMG_5584.jpg']

    [eimg url='http://konsertfoto.se/blog/wp-content/uploads/20100416-IMG_4868.jpg' title='20100416-IMG_4868.jpg']

  • Oskar Allerby August 27, 2010 12:19 am

    Rick, from what I can read and see on your website you're not that experienced concertphotographer. I've been doing this for 3 years (and maybe 100 shows). Everything from small swedish acts to for example Guns and Roses, Slayer or Depeche Mode.

    You talk about photographing in a pub. That is one thing. The lights can be nothing. But when you move up to even a small venue you have no chance to speak with the musicans. And the deal is almost always the first 3 songs and no flash.

    I agree that using a flash is giving more crisp but it doesn't add color. It takes away the color that the stage-light uses. It shows what the show would be like in broad daylight.

    Here you can see how you use the light to show the feeling of the show..
    [eimg url='http://konsertfoto.se/blog/wp-content/uploads/20070118-IMG_1726.jpg' title='20070118-IMG_1726.jpg']

    [eimg url='http://konsertfoto.se/blog/wp-content/uploads/20100206-IMG_9111.jpg' title='20100206-IMG_9111.jpg']

    [eimg url='http://allerby.com/dagens/wp-content/uploads/IMG_19261.jpg' title='IMG_19261.jpg']

    and finaly, two drumshots

    [eimg url='http://allerby.com/dagens/wp-content/uploads/20100717-00.14.40-IMG_0586.jpg' title='20100717-00.14.40-IMG_0586.jpg']

    [eimg url='http://allerby.com/dagens/wp-content/uploads/20100716-23.56.36-_MG_1174.jpg' title='20100716-23.56.36-_MG_1174.jpg'][eimg url='http://konsertfoto.se/blog/wp-content/uploads/20091212-IMG_5584.jpg' title='20091212-IMG_5584.jpg']

  • Rick Bennett August 26, 2010 11:19 am

    @Chris: thanks for the feedback. The difference between a remote flash and a coolpix flash is that you're almost never looking at the remote flash because it isn't anywhere near your field of vision. In fact, the guitar player in the second pic of part 3 said to me, upon seeing a print of that very pic "Wow! I didn't realize it was that bright in there." When I explained that I had used flash he was genuinely surprised, and hadn't noticed.

    As for atmosphere, I totally agree, if there is atmosphere to be had. Remote flash is just one of the tools I use, in addition to f/1.8 and f/2.8 lenses, long shutter speeds, zoom effects, etc. Flash doesn't always work for a shot, and likewise, I've found, ambient doesn't always work either. But ultimately, I guess you're correct, it is preference. I like the result of a bright, well lit shot. Next time I head out though, I'll definitely try to capture more of the atmosphere.

    Thanks for the constructive comments.

  • Fingerling August 26, 2010 10:58 am

    First off all.. Shooting bands in Bars for me sounds more like a shooting for promo or cover, not shooting a gig. For the ambient light shooting. Usualy stage has 2 set of lights. Front light (tungsten, static lights, pointed towards musicians), those do not change (only if they want total darknes, when changing guitars ect.) And back lights which usualy have effects or filters on, and are projected on a smoke screen. So why would you use a auto ISO if you have constant thungsten light on the performer? Just mearsure it at the begining, and thats it. In my oppinion your sample photos look flat, whit too much flash. Ther is no stage life on those photos. Maybe you selected wrong ones.

  • chris August 26, 2010 08:49 am

    I kind of agree with Richie on all those points (though I really appreciate all the effort you've put into this series-- LOVED part 1, can't wait for part 3).

    As an infrequent bar-musician, I've gotten really frustrated with people flashing me with their nikon coolpix, even though if they asked permission, I'd tell them it's ok (you don't want to say no to a potential fan!).

    I also agree that the flash kills all the cool atmosphere that you get in venues-- even venues with crappy/little stage lighting. What you gain in clarity you lose a hundred-fold in terms of interestingness. For example, that top photo might well have been posed in a studio or candidly. Without the aid of funky stage lighting, it's hard to tell, oh this is definitely at a concert. The lighting (even, and maybe especially, poor lighting) really tells the viewer, "this was a concert, yes, it was awesome, and this was it. sucks to be you if you weren't there." I just don't get that from concert pictures with a flash.

    And, please don't take that as criticism-- lord knows my over-processed fooling around with a DSLR in no way qualifies me to critique ANYone else's work. It's mostly a matter of taste, but I'd totally prefer a slightly blurry/underexposed shot with interesting lighting to a flash shot in this case.

    Thanks again for this series. I really hope you don't take this as me harshing on any of it. I've learned quite a lot from you!

  • Rick Bennett August 26, 2010 05:28 am

    @Richie
    1) In Part 1 I described flash vs glass as a tough choice. For me, it was a single step in investing in my gear. I now have a 70-200mm f/2.8.
    2) Perhaps this is considered disrespect in Hungary, but EVERY musician I've talked to (in USA) about it has told me it is not disturbing at all.
    3) Perhaps this is considered disrespect in Hungary, but every FAN I've talked to (in USA) about is has told me it is not disturbing at all.
    4) A flash duration of 1/1000 of a second has an incredibly low likelihood of affecting other photographers unless they are using seconds long exposures. And for the sake of the audience, I don't shoot when another DSLR shooter is obviously taking pictures.
    5) On this point I'll have to respectfully disagree with you. It can add color and crispness where otherwise there would be just noise and blur.

    The other point that perhaps isn't obvious--I don't shoot EXCLUSIVELY with flash. It depends on the venue and the look I'm attempting to attain. It is one tool that might be available. I also don't shoot the whole performance with flash--I give it a break or change the lens to make sure I'm not irritating anyone because I do realize it is a possibility.

  • Richie August 26, 2010 04:33 am

    one thing disturbs me in the article: using the flash!
    for me using the flash means:
    1) you do not invest in your gear (to be able to shot in low-light environment...),
    2) you do not respect the artist (the flash can be very disturbing! just ask a few musician, before they throw you out...),
    3) you do not respect the audience (they paid to see the artist WITHOUT a disturbing flashlights...),
    4) you do not respect the other photographers working around (you can kill their pictures...)
    5) the flash kills the mood/atmosphere and you get flat/white pictures (like your samples...)

    in summary, leave the flash for the fans with compact cameras/mobile phones...
    sorry to say, but i am envy of you, if you get paid for this kind of concert/flash-photography...

  • val August 26, 2010 01:17 am

    .
    Great series. The lighting diagram shows camera right vs left. What did I miss?
    .

  • David August 25, 2010 11:30 pm

    You mention using a flash. If you are shooting local bands in a bar this may be possible. Almost every concert or touring act I've ever shot does not allow flash photography. This makes it even more difficult to get the exposure correct and make sure you have a fast enough shutter speed to stop the motion.

  • Danferno August 25, 2010 08:28 pm

    I think the JPEG with noise reduction is so you can quickly see how successful the shot is - note that she's only shooting "Basic JPEG", so she's not using those as end-result.

  • Steve August 25, 2010 05:52 pm

    One of the better tips there is standing left center to show more of the band with guitars. Great tip!

  • Rick Bennett August 25, 2010 10:38 am

    Sorry about the 404 on the light diagram. Fixed now.

  • taabitha August 25, 2010 08:49 am

    Dave, I shoot band shots in RAW for the opposite reason. It's really rare that I'm dealing with blown highlights (shooting with available light) so I shoot in RAW so I can underexpose a stop or two when necessary (when the light is *really* dim and I'm already at my highest ISO) and then bring the shadows back up. Can't do that with JPEG.

  • taabitha August 25, 2010 08:47 am

    The lighting diagram link is 404 - it's mispelled (ligthing instead of lighting) in the link.

  • Chris Babcock August 25, 2010 08:45 am

    i've shot several bands in bars. I shoot in RAW without flash. Usually, I can get away with ISO 800. The lighting determines my lens choice. I used to shoot in Manual mode, but changing the shutter speed or aperture for each shot got old. Shooting in Av mode has become more the norm so I can up the exposure compensation if need be. I just recently started playing with the color temperature to achieve more accurate skin tones while keeping the stage lighting.
    Here are some examples - http://www.c-bphotography.com/Bands

  • Skye August 25, 2010 08:00 am

    the camera applies better noise reduction than Lightroom? Please clarify.

  • Dave Hodgkinson August 25, 2010 07:25 am

    Noise reduction in JPEG is just a side-effect of the compression process. Don't sweat it. You'll JPEG it for the web or print where ink-bleed will smooth a little. Stick with RAW. It'll give you a stop or so of leeway if you have to drag back blown highlights.

  • Graham August 25, 2010 07:04 am

    You mention the RAW file gives you most control over colour etc. and Jpeg gives best noise reduction.. does this mean you then chose between colour depth or noise reduction? I prefer shooting in just RAW, you an apply noise reduction afterwards and as a bonus you save space.

  • Linda Holmes August 25, 2010 06:53 am

    Not long ago I got the opportunity to photography some DJ's at a local club. Lots of fun. I preferred using no flash for my shots, gave much more of a 'true' feeling from the venue rather that a 'cold' look when I used the flash. Only trouble was I needed to slow the shutter speed so had an issue with shake. Check out the results ...
    http://lindaphotoart.wordpress.com/?s=feel+the+beat&submit=Search

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