Minimalist Photography ~ 4 Tips To Keep It Simple With A Maximum Impact

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Minimalism is a very subjective concept in the art world. The Webster dictionary defines it as follows: A style or technique that is characterized by extreme spareness and simplicity. Some love it, others hate it, but no one seems to be indifferent. Many artists thrive in the openness of the concept, others have a problem with the lack of definition and direction. Many of us are drawn to ‘less is more’ with simple lines, geometric patterns, strong shadows, contrasting colors, lone subjects, etc. For others, deciding what to leave out of the frame to make a stronger image is a difficult exercise. Here are a few tips and examples to get you started in your quest for minimalist imagery.

©Valerie Jardin ~ Contrasting colors make for great minimalist subjects.

©Valerie Jardin ~ Bright colors make great minimalist subjects.

1. Composition

“Keep it simple” doesn’t mean “keep it boring”. Contrary to what you may think, a minimalist approach requires a lot of creativity. The use of negative space is an integral part of minimalist photography.  A well placed subject doesn’t have to be large to have a big impact.  Deciding what to leave out of the frame and create a stronger image can be challenging and often requires a lot of practice until it becomes the way you see. I recommend training yourself to make those decisions in camera instead of cropping unwanted distractions in post processing. A clever use of depth of field will also isolate your subject from the background by shooting with an aperture as wide (smallest number) as your lens will allow.

2. Textures and colors

A bright color or contrasting colors make great minimalist subjects. The same applies to textures. The viewer should be able to almost feel the texture. Sometimes it’s all about finding a creative angle to make the photograph. Don’t be afraid the experiment. Shoot straight on, shoot high or  low, work your frame until you get the shot that will speak to you.

3. Lines and geometric patterns

Strong lines make strong images. A good place to get started with minimalist photography is by paying attention to modern architecture around you. Leading lines, and other geometric shapes, can make great backdrops for minimalist pictures. Isolating a bird on a power line, if done well, can make a great minimalist shot. There are great opportunities around you all the time, you just have to learn to see them and that requires practice.

4. Telling a story

Push your minimalist photography to the next level by telling a story. Minimalist street photography showcases an interesting urban landscape with a human element. The human element, however small, becomes the focal point of the image. Yet, it’s the interesting background that draws the photographer to make the shot. Symmetry, lines, curves, shadows all play a vital part in making the photograph. Sometimes the story and the environment come together spontaneously and it’s the photographer’s job to see it and respond quickly. Other times it require a bit of patience for the right subject to walk through the frame. A minimalist approach to photography can be applied in nature as well as in an urban environment. You can practice anywhere, so get out there and open yourself to a different way of seeing with your camera!

©Valerie Jardin ~  The use of negative space is an integral part of minimalist photography.

©Valerie Jardin ~ The use of negative space is an integral part of minimalist photography.

©Valerie Jardin

©Valerie Jardin ~ Using a shallow depth of field will allow you to isolate your subject from a distracting background.

©Valerie Jardin ~ You can use a minimalist approach in nature as well as in an urban environment.

©Valerie Jardin ~ You can use a minimalist approach in nature as well as in an urban environment.

©Valerie Jardin

©Valerie Jardin

©Valerie Jardin

©Valerie Jardin

©Valerie Jardin

©Valerie Jardin

©Valerie Jardin ~ Strong lines make strong images.

©Valerie Jardin ~ Strong lines make strong images.

©Valerie Jardin

©Valerie Jardin

©Valerie Jardin

©Valerie Jardin

©Valerie Jardin ~  The viewer should be able to almost feel the texture. Sometimes it’s all about finding a creative angle to make the photograph.

©Valerie Jardin ~ The viewer should be able to almost feel the texture. Sometimes it’s all about finding a creative angle to make the photograph.

©Valerie Jardin ~ In minimalist street photography The human element, however small, becomes the focal point of the image.

©Valerie Jardin ~ Minimalist street photography showcases an interesting urban landscape with a human element.

©Valerie Jardin ~ The human element, however small, becomes the focal point of the image.

©Valerie Jardin ~ The human element, however small, becomes the focal point of the image.

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Valerie Jardin I live and breathe in pixels! Photography is more than a passion, it's an obsession, almost an addiction. When I'm not shooting or writing, I spend my time teaching this beautiful craft during photo workshops all over the world! I am also thrilled to be an official X Photographer for Fujifilm USA. Visit my Website Follow me on Facebook , Twitter , Instagram. And listen to my Podcast!

  • Teresa Sorbilli

    i love minimalism!

Some Older Comments

  • Janice Brown September 4, 2013 05:23 am

    Wow. Great article and awesome examples to illustrate it. Thanks for sharing what you know so generously.

  • Peter June 25, 2013 08:12 am

    Wonderful & very inspiring!

  • ArturoMM June 15, 2013 05:07 am

    Correction: the photo of the stairs and the crystal squares I liked very much.

  • ArturoMM June 15, 2013 05:05 am

    I don't know what happens to me, I only liked the first photo, the others seemed so boring to me.

  • Rosa De Cyan June 14, 2013 07:47 pm

    In this moment in my life, I feell my mind going in this direction. I love it.

    http://fragmentsde-i-realitat.blogspot.com.es/

    A greeting.

  • Colin Burt June 14, 2013 11:03 am

    Great article, great examples. I give it a try now and then, like these,

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/67900028@N08/8591594048/

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/67900028@N08/8810320521/

  • Bill Brennan June 14, 2013 10:25 am

    Very good article with excellent images.

    Bill Brennan

  • Allen June 14, 2013 09:00 am

    Hi Valarie. What a great article, I love your work and what amazing examples.

    I am not a fan of "Post Processing" so I was thrilled to read an article that doesn't bang on about "Post Processing" amazing stuff. I will be looking at "Less is More" as a theme for some of my photos now as I really love the idea. Artists talk about the "Ability to see" as they look at a scene or whatever and I find the most challenging part of photography is "Learning To See" and the rest is easy.

  • Denise Aitken June 14, 2013 08:20 am

    We recently had Minimalistic as a topic for our photography club. It came about following a judge's comment last year that many of the images displayed had too much happening - images within images and that it was confusing to the eye.

    The minimalistic topic was a challenge to many to start with, but the results displayed on club night was great and generated lots of discussion. The variety of subjects was fantastic as members had put a lot of thought into it.

    It does take practice to 'see' like this. If you persist, you may eventually find that many of these elements appear in your photo, without having thought about them consciously. The end result is cleaner, less complicated images.

    I love it. Thanks for the article

  • Deborah June 12, 2013 05:11 am

    Great examples! It does require thoughtfulness & composition. The right balance is not easy; I shoot a lot of duds enroute to a successful image!

  • Roberto June 11, 2013 09:54 pm

    Great post.
    Here are my minimal shot
    http://www.robertomarzola.it/index.asp?categoria=Minimal&galleria=1

  • Ravinder Dang June 9, 2013 11:17 pm

    I'm a great believer of minimalism. Thanks for this article. I try this all the time.

  • Kim June 9, 2013 11:11 pm

    Wonderful article and images.
    Thanks

    Kim

  • Rob Gipman June 9, 2013 09:38 pm

    Here is my attempt some time back, and thx 4 a great tip again :) http://www.flickr.com/photos/gipukan/8502485617/

  • Steve Brill June 9, 2013 08:59 pm

    Great article and just shows that having great observational skills are so important. It's true that 'less is more'.

  • Jay June 9, 2013 03:12 am

    Great post. Rarely do we see the photos support the writing like yours do. Keep these coming, please!

  • Linda Chaplin June 9, 2013 02:34 am

    As always, a helpful article, Valerie. I am practicing "seeing" like you do even if I don't have my camera with me!

  • Steve June 8, 2013 05:38 pm

    Minimalist nature shot

    http://wildlifeencounters.photoshelter.com/gallery-image/African-birds/G0000XwUHH9qS0yY/I00001GvYcf_B8kQ/C0000bdEkyK_8Dzs

  • Danny June 8, 2013 09:33 am

    This has always been my style of choice.. I just had never attached a name to it.. Now I know what to call it... So often to my eye, less is more.

  • Andrew June 8, 2013 07:32 am

    Love the simplicity, especially your images with the "lines". Thanks for your article and love your images too.

  • Darlene Hildebrandt June 8, 2013 04:44 am

    Nice article Valerie, good tips!

  • Guigphotography June 8, 2013 04:19 am

    Terrific tips and lovely shots Valerie. I particularly like the birds on the wheel. I often like to underexpose to isolate the subject (see attached) but would definitely like to try more of the dark on light shots.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/69604456@N07/8705838491/

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