How to Use Ordinary Items to Make DIY Photo Filters

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In photography, you can use filters in many ways to alter and/or enhance your images. But what if you don’t have any filters, or can’t afford the high prices to the top of the line ones? Time to rummage around the house for some things to make DIY photo filters!

8 DIY photo filters you can make at home

In this first video from COOPH, see how you can use some everyday things you likely have around the house to make some fun and interesting DIY photo filters.

Keep in mind that you may not get top-quality images or award-worthy ones this way, but the point is to experiment and have some fun and see what you like. Then you can decide if you like a certain technique and will use it whether or not it’s worth investing in a more expensive filter.

Make your own photo filters

Next up is a video from CNET with a few more ideas for DIY photo filters.

Get some colored cellophane, a wine glass, some plastic wrap and a bit of Vaseline and you’re ready to give this a go.

6 Creative photography tricks

This last one isn’t so much about filters as it is things you can put in front of your lens (that’s kind of like a filter right?) to alter the image. Again, it’s about being creative, thinking outside the box and asking the question, “What if?”

How creative can you get? What other easy to find items have you used to make DIY photo filters or create other image effects? Please share in the comments below.

Read more from our Tips & Tutorials category

Darlene Hildebrandt is the Managing Editor of dPS. She is also an educator who teaches aspiring amateurs and hobbyists how to improve their skills through articles, online photography classes, and travel tours to exotic places like Morocco and India. To help you at whatever level you're at she has two email mini-courses. Sign up for her free beginner OR portrait photography email mini-course here. Or get both, no charge!

  • Michael Barnes

    love these ideas, cant wait to try some!

  • Chic McCormick

    Used bubbles when photographing wild flowers. It only takes a slight breeze to make it a wee bit of a challenge, when you’re working on your own.

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