How I Stumbled Across an Amazing Way to Slow Down My Shooting Process

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A guest post by John Davenport

I, like many new photographers, would walk around shooting everything I saw without consciously thinking about the way it was framed or the settings on my camera. If you browse through the archives of my blog you’ll see a clear pattern of growth and learning in the images, but admittedly, I still have a long way to go!

Tree Over the Water.jpeg

For me it’s always been hard to slow down. I’ve always been the type of person that wanted results now, not later, and slowing down to think through a shot seemed like I’d be wasting time. Even after reading posts here on dPS like, these three stupidly simple reasons, it still took me a while to learn to slow down. For the first few months of my photography experience I handheld everything – it just took too long to set up the tripod.

Of course, I finally did get sick of those blurry images and I decided that the tripod was worth more than just a good walking stick after all. While, at first setting up the tripod did help me slow down and it certainly improved my image quality, it didn’t help me slow down to the point where I was thinking critically about the shot. I was still going too fast!

So What’s This Magical New Method?

While out on a typical photo walk I stumbled upon this awesome new technique when this crazy idea to pull out my iPhone and film my camera setup popped in my head. I decided to explain my thought process on the shot, and finally I ended up sharing that video with my small group of readers over on my blog. The result was the photo you see above and the video embedded below.

Okay, so it’s rough around the edges, but be kind, it’s my first video ever, and I am frozen!

The point here isn’t the quality of the video or even the fact that I’m recording it with the mindset to show my readers how I took the shot. The point I have is that recording a video like this is a good idea even if you’re not going to show it to anyone! It took me until when I got home that night to realize exactly why, but here are the reasons I came up with.

Three Benefits of Recording Your Shot

  1. You’re Forced to Talk About It – When you’re out setting up the shot how often do you actually talk it through? I know we always say, “Think it through, frame it right, and double check your settings”, but a video forces you to talk through the shot and that’s a completely different experience.
  2. You’ve got Evidence – After a typical shoot all you’re going to have is the memories and your photographs. A video will give you a clear view of how you set the camera up and even an insight into your thought process when you were shooting which is something that’d be hard to convey otherwise.
  3. And of course Slow Methodical Set Up – Due to the added time it takes to record a video you’re without a doubt going to slow down and think about the shot from every possible angle, which should result in a better composed image.

Now I know recording a video is impossible for every single shot and I don’t expect anyone to do that, but personally I’m going to try to do this process at least once every week or two.

Can you think of any other benefits to recording your shot? Have you ever done something like this? I’d love to hear what you think.

John Davenport is an avid amateur photographer who posts daily photos on his blog Phogropathy. You can find him on Facebook, Twitter and his brand new Youtube Channel.

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  • Very nice picture ! I am the worst at slowing down, with that said I will give this a shot… Anything will slow me down at this point

  • John

    Since it is your first video – I would offer the following
    1: keep going – I think it is great for the creative experience to teach – even via video.
    2: work on post production – you could always do a voice track later when you are warm.
    3: Steady Cam – yup they have them even for iPhones – and not expensive.

    take a look at greyscalegorilla early videos – I love the one from the airport.

    Thank you for the opportunity to see this fieldwork – gets me thinking I should do the same.

  • Thanks for the tips John! I do realize i’ve got a lot of work when it comes to the recording of a video and I didn’t even think about doing voice overs later in post production! I could definitely try that at some point.

    I’m working on a few other ideas for videos from attempting to get into time-lapse photography to editing tutorials. All in good time tho.

    Thanks for the comment 🙂

  • What a novel idea. But sometimes the trips I take are at such a breathtaking speed that I need to click.

    http://blogs.gonomad.com/traveltalesfromindia/2012/01/lakhmana-sand-dunes-jaisalmer-rajasthan.html

  • Holly

    I really enjoyed your video. It was nice to see the process behind the end result. Loved how the finished photo came out. Great job!

  • Hi

    Thanks for the advice! I usually try to slow down by using a tripod and if I dont have one, I inagine thtat I have one, Forces me to stop snapping and start composing. This simple shot of Chicago’s bean took over twenty minutes – so what! It allowed me to really look at this amazing sculpture!

    Cheers, Erik

    http://kerstenbeckphotoart.wordpress.com/2012/01/26/two-worlds-the-bean-people/

  • Mr Grumpy

    Interesting but it would appear that you left a vital piece of equipment at home, no matter how cold it might have been, vital particularly if you are going to record yourself: kleenex. Otherwise it’s rather off-putting for the listener.

    You can still buy packets, I believe, in most supermarkets.

  • Or shoot LF…

  • Scottc

    An interesting technique, anything that makes you slow down and think (assuming there is time for the shot) is worth the while.

    Probably the only time I’ve ever really slowed down, and the point was a steady shot, was when shooting stained glass hand held.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/lendog64/sets/72157626664460062/

  • Another way to slow down us to use manual lenses. I love using vintage gear and I find that the older fast primes can be had for close to a 1/10 th of modern AF gear. Check out my blog it’s all vintage glass

  • Jim

    I slow myself down by shooting in Manual Mode and for static subjects I focus manually

  • Great idea! It will also help in improving videography skills.

  • raghavendra

    This is nice picture.
    Waiting for something to happen and get a clear cut shot
    shows the patience and passion!

    http://raghavendra-mobilephotography.blogspot.com/2010/09/one-fine-evening.html

  • Gina

    Great Idea. I have had too many -What was I thinking!?!?- pictures. Adding video will definitely make me slow down and think before I shoot. Thank you for sharing.

  • Tim

    Results look reasonable, at least 🙂

  • Lee

    First off nice shot. I would say there are several schools of thought here, every photographer has a different method or approach when it comes to image capture. Ansel Adams for one would wait patiently for hours to get just the right shot and Josef Karsh would interview his subjects to get to know something about them before ever setting up to photograph them. On the other hand some images won’t wait for anyone so you’d better be quick. I capture a lot of images as they appear while driving at about 60-100km/h and I have gotten a lot of very good images using a Canon G7 & G9, just saying what ever works

  • Charlotte

    You are doing great inspirational work.

    But a tripod also has the disadvantage that all the shots can become static. All shots are done from the same hight. Horizon in the same place, and a lack of composition, because you don’t move the tripod back and forth, or something as simple as tilt or lift the camera angle…
    (just take a tour though Flickr and see how easy it is to tell, that the photographer was using a tripod!)
    In this particular case of your great shot here, it would have benefited from lifting the camera a bit, so you had gotten the treetop in the frame, and cut some in the bottom of the frame – or stepped some feet back..

  • Hmmm… I think I should do this. So far there are very few people who do this in my line of Photography.

    I do Car Photography for http://CustomPinoyRides.com

    I think that this will also help me not only in becoming more critical about my photos – therefore vastly improving my photography, it will also make me sort of a go-to person when it comes to Car Photography! Hmmm not bad! Thanks for the idea! It’s a really big help! I’m sure if you keep this up, the same will happen to you. Keep going!

  • Matjaz

    Hi,

    this doesn’t have anything to do with slowing down, but I still do have a question. How did you make three shots one after another automatically with different exposure? Is this only a high end DSLR camera feautre?

    Thank you!

    Best regards,
    Matjaz

  • RE: Matjaz Question

    Matjaz. That is called “exposure bracketing”. It is a pretty common feature on newer cameras, but it is not available on all models. Without knowing your exact camera, it is hard to tell if your camera supports this. I recommend that you go into your user manual and check for this feature. I am guessing that you want to do this to take an HDR shot…another way to subtly over / under expose an image is to manipulate a single RAW image. You do not have quite the control that you do with exposure bracketing, but you should be able to draw out the highlights and shadows. Good luck!

  • Great advice, and great video – keep it up!

  • I’ve read somewhere recently, about someone who does the same as me. That’s to just sit or stand there for the 10 minutes or so, just soaking up the atmosphere. I often find it helps me. I don’t even take my camera out in that time.Here is one where I sat for about a half hour. I was having my lunch as well though 😉

    http://wp.me/p268wp-5d

    Good luck everyone.

    M.

  • @ Matjaz – As far as firing three shots automatically many cameras (even some entry level DSLRs) are capable of it, but not all of them. You’d have to check the manual of your camera to see if there’s an auto bracketing feature. The thing that more professional level cameras get you is the ability to take 5 7 or 9 exposures where as many of the lower end models only allow 3 shots.

    @ charlotte – As much as a tripod can be a cumbersome hinderance when you’re lugging it around there the fact that it creates stability for long shutters and for multiple exposures of HDR it’s a necessity in my book. I disagree with you that a tripod prohibits you in your composition. Many tripods and tripod heads let you have the freedom to frame your shot however you want.

    Many people brought up the idea of using manual focus to slow down their process and while this is certainly true and by all means a valid technique for slowing down the process of taking a photo it does leave out one of the key components to recording a video – talking about the shot.

    We can always think through the shot, but when we’re forced to talk about it, and explain why we’ve set up the camera the way we have, it not only is slowing the process down, but we’re comprehending why we’re using the settings and location we’re using.

    Thanks for all the comments everyone! Glad to hear all the positive feedback 🙂

  • Peter

    Great photo but you were so focused on the video that you missed on the composition and cut off the top of the tree. It seems to me too complicated of a solution while still letting some details slip though the cracks. Keep it simple. Just use a check list. That is what pilots use to get the job done right every time.

  • Matjaz

    Thank you, I have found it. I have a Canon EOS550D. I thought it might have this function, I just didn’t know what it was called.

    Thanks again!

  • John Deir

    I can identify with being cold and how hard it is to deal with a runny nose, fingers that do not respond due to the tingling hurt of the freeze, and eyes that start watering due to any breeze that seems to find any little space of your body that is exposed.

    Then to position and compose a camera, get a great shot and video it all and by yourself. Great job and effort. Thanks for sharing.

  • linus

    Good article there. For me, slowing down means waiting to get the right location. I took this shot of windmills at mykonos. Now that’s being a tourist hotspot was hyper crowded. Not only that, I was not carrying a tripod so as a solution I jumped into some old ruins among the pile of garbage bags and used a boundary wall as support. I waited there quietly till I got the scene for a clear shot. All this time I was looked upon with funny expression by several tourist, but the outcome was satisfactory.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/linusmvs2/6518346571/

  • Jean Farmer

    I love this video! It isn’t MEANT to be studio quality. It isn’t MEANT to have great sound. It is meant to slow down the taking of your still shots and make you think about them. I LOVE THIS IDEA! Thanks so much for sharing. Beautiful photo as a result of your thinking more about it.

  • Fred

    Great article!!

    Just like the old (film) days I would carry a small notebook in my pocket and write down the location, “f” stop shutter speed, lens. etc and film ASA now known as ISO!!! I still shoot film using the same ideas I learn as a kid. It’s too easy today to blast away at a subject without thinking!! Try that with a film camera and you will blast away 24 or 36 exposures and now waste time reloading again.

    Try shooting film and think about what you are shooting take your time (if possible) Enjoy the art of making pictures instead of just taking pictures.

    JMHO

    Fred

  • OzMercan

    “2: work on post production – you could always do a voice track later when you are warm.”

    “…I didn’t even think about doing voice overs later in post production!”

    @John 1 and John 2 – I just mention this to remind the readers of the main point of the exercise – slowing the process down and thereby forcing a thought process during shooting. Hence talking it through and thus hearing and walking it through and thus doing the setup realtime, enabling opportunity to catch any potential stuff-ups and development for bright idea improvement, such as, “hey, what if I shot this (fill in the blank[s] here)?”. Post production is too late.

    Just as the author acknowledged later; “when we’re forced to talk about it, and explain why we’ve set up the camera the way we have, it not only is slowing the process down, but we’re comprehending why we’re using the settings and location we’re using.”

    Cheerz

  • Laurie

    I just bought a new cannon powershot sx230HS, I bought it to take pictures of my son on teammates on his ice hockey team in action. so far Blur blur blur. sometimes it’s got, but when I zoom them on the computer, they are terrible. also, on their roller hockey team, their uniforms are purple, they keep coming out blue!!! is this camera able to do what i want it to do or should I return it??? Please help!! thank you. email paulnlaurie@charter.net

  • Alan Klaw

    Fine,Pensive and inciteful. Best. Alan New Mexico USA

  • OzMercan

    @laurie Most “point and shoot” models have facilities that allow for white balance WB adjustment to cope with artificial lighting which will approximate a more natural colour. I would guess the lighting would be Tungsten.

    Hockey is an action sport and must be shot with the camera ISO set to a higher value say 800 or higher, especially for anything less than daylight. Selecting a fast shutter limit say 1/250 of a second or faster is also essential to capture the frenetic action of the moment.

    Seems these features are available for the model you have: “Simply switch to Manual Control and have the flexibility in your shooting settings to get more creative” which I’ve pinched from the Canon site.

  • John Duval

    I like the idea of this article, but to my mind the video showed the wrong part of the process, the part that does not need to be slowed down. Operating the tripod, camera and settings is pure mechanics. The most important part of the shot should be done while the camera is still in the bag.

    It is only when you know what will be in frame, and what will be excluded, where the camera will be positioned, what lens you will use, what speed or apeture settings you will use that you bring out the hardware. At that point, it should only take a couple of minutes to take the shot.

    Once the camera is on the tripod, however, there is still the aspect of timing. You do need to wait, sometimes very long periods of time, for all the elements to fall just so; wind, sun, animals, people, mist etc.

    Then again, filming these things would make a pretty boring video! Insetad, I like to write down my workflow and thought process from time to time. It keeps me mindfull of where my time is best spent, which is not playing with the camera.

  • Sassy Deelish

    Like you said, I don’t know that I’ll be making a video for every important shot that I take, but as a tool to help you slow down to really think through a shot, it’s a pretty good idea.

    One thing I’ve started doing recently is taking voice notes. If your camera has a microphone and allows you to associate an audio file with a particular shot, you can record notes about the photo you’ve just taken. Usually I take notes with regard to what emotional valence I would like to convey with this photo and how I will probably have to process the photo in LR to get that effect. Doing this gets me to think about what I’m trying to achieve with the composition/settings/camera position that I’ve chosen. This critical reflection often makes me think of other, better ways I might achieve my vision.

  • Em?ls Kravalis

    I haven’t really ever filmed a video like this, but sometimes, if I go for a walk with my sister instead of alone, I will spend less time taking shots in general, but the ones I do take I quite naturally tell her about why I do this and why that and why not something else etc. As of yet I’m still far from a good photographer, and my sister doesn’t do photography at all, so it’s not much of a discussion, but it certainly is benefitial, also if I do end up with alot less photos taken compared to when I go on my own.

Some Older Comments

  • John Duval February 5, 2012 08:32 am

    I like the idea of this article, but to my mind the video showed the wrong part of the process, the part that does not need to be slowed down. Operating the tripod, camera and settings is pure mechanics. The most important part of the shot should be done while the camera is still in the bag.

    It is only when you know what will be in frame, and what will be excluded, where the camera will be positioned, what lens you will use, what speed or apeture settings you will use that you bring out the hardware. At that point, it should only take a couple of minutes to take the shot.

    Once the camera is on the tripod, however, there is still the aspect of timing. You do need to wait, sometimes very long periods of time, for all the elements to fall just so; wind, sun, animals, people, mist etc.

    Then again, filming these things would make a pretty boring video! Insetad, I like to write down my workflow and thought process from time to time. It keeps me mindfull of where my time is best spent, which is not playing with the camera.

  • OzMercan February 4, 2012 11:05 am

    @laurie Most "point and shoot" models have facilities that allow for white balance WB adjustment to cope with artificial lighting which will approximate a more natural colour. I would guess the lighting would be Tungsten.

    Hockey is an action sport and must be shot with the camera ISO set to a higher value say 800 or higher, especially for anything less than daylight. Selecting a fast shutter limit say 1/250 of a second or faster is also essential to capture the frenetic action of the moment.

    Seems these features are available for the model you have: "Simply switch to Manual Control and have the flexibility in your shooting settings to get more creative" which I've pinched from the Canon site.

  • Alan Klaw February 4, 2012 07:23 am

    Fine,Pensive and inciteful. Best. Alan New Mexico USA

  • Laurie February 3, 2012 11:54 am

    I just bought a new cannon powershot sx230HS, I bought it to take pictures of my son on teammates on his ice hockey team in action. so far Blur blur blur. sometimes it's got, but when I zoom them on the computer, they are terrible. also, on their roller hockey team, their uniforms are purple, they keep coming out blue!!! is this camera able to do what i want it to do or should I return it??? Please help!! thank you. email paulnlaurie@charter.net

  • OzMercan February 3, 2012 09:03 am

    "2: work on post production – you could always do a voice track later when you are warm."

    "...I didn’t even think about doing voice overs later in post production!"

    @John 1 and John 2 - I just mention this to remind the readers of the main point of the exercise - slowing the process down and thereby forcing a thought process during shooting. Hence talking it through and thus hearing and walking it through and thus doing the setup realtime, enabling opportunity to catch any potential stuff-ups and development for bright idea improvement, such as, "hey, what if I shot this (fill in the blank[s] here)?". Post production is too late.

    Just as the author acknowledged later; "when we’re forced to talk about it, and explain why we’ve set up the camera the way we have, it not only is slowing the process down, but we’re comprehending why we’re using the settings and location we’re using."

    Cheerz

  • Fred February 3, 2012 06:57 am

    Great article!!

    Just like the old (film) days I would carry a small notebook in my pocket and write down the location, "f" stop shutter speed, lens. etc and film ASA now known as ISO!!! I still shoot film using the same ideas I learn as a kid. It's too easy today to blast away at a subject without thinking!! Try that with a film camera and you will blast away 24 or 36 exposures and now waste time reloading again.

    Try shooting film and think about what you are shooting take your time (if possible) Enjoy the art of making pictures instead of just taking pictures.

    JMHO

    Fred

  • Jean Farmer February 3, 2012 03:49 am

    I love this video! It isn't MEANT to be studio quality. It isn't MEANT to have great sound. It is meant to slow down the taking of your still shots and make you think about them. I LOVE THIS IDEA! Thanks so much for sharing. Beautiful photo as a result of your thinking more about it.

  • linus February 2, 2012 04:59 am

    Good article there. For me, slowing down means waiting to get the right location. I took this shot of windmills at mykonos. Now that's being a tourist hotspot was hyper crowded. Not only that, I was not carrying a tripod so as a solution I jumped into some old ruins among the pile of garbage bags and used a boundary wall as support. I waited there quietly till I got the scene for a clear shot. All this time I was looked upon with funny expression by several tourist, but the outcome was satisfactory.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/linusmvs2/6518346571/

  • John Deir February 1, 2012 08:30 am

    I can identify with being cold and how hard it is to deal with a runny nose, fingers that do not respond due to the tingling hurt of the freeze, and eyes that start watering due to any breeze that seems to find any little space of your body that is exposed.

    Then to position and compose a camera, get a great shot and video it all and by yourself. Great job and effort. Thanks for sharing.

  • Matjaz January 31, 2012 07:23 pm

    Thank you, I have found it. I have a Canon EOS550D. I thought it might have this function, I just didn't know what it was called.

    Thanks again!

  • Peter January 31, 2012 01:20 pm

    Great photo but you were so focused on the video that you missed on the composition and cut off the top of the tree. It seems to me too complicated of a solution while still letting some details slip though the cracks. Keep it simple. Just use a check list. That is what pilots use to get the job done right every time.

  • John January 31, 2012 09:53 am

    @ Matjaz - As far as firing three shots automatically many cameras (even some entry level DSLRs) are capable of it, but not all of them. You'd have to check the manual of your camera to see if there's an auto bracketing feature. The thing that more professional level cameras get you is the ability to take 5 7 or 9 exposures where as many of the lower end models only allow 3 shots.

    @ charlotte - As much as a tripod can be a cumbersome hinderance when you're lugging it around there the fact that it creates stability for long shutters and for multiple exposures of HDR it's a necessity in my book. I disagree with you that a tripod prohibits you in your composition. Many tripods and tripod heads let you have the freedom to frame your shot however you want.

    Many people brought up the idea of using manual focus to slow down their process and while this is certainly true and by all means a valid technique for slowing down the process of taking a photo it does leave out one of the key components to recording a video - talking about the shot.

    We can always think through the shot, but when we're forced to talk about it, and explain why we've set up the camera the way we have, it not only is slowing the process down, but we're comprehending why we're using the settings and location we're using.

    Thanks for all the comments everyone! Glad to hear all the positive feedback :)

  • MikeC366 January 31, 2012 08:29 am

    I've read somewhere recently, about someone who does the same as me. That's to just sit or stand there for the 10 minutes or so, just soaking up the atmosphere. I often find it helps me. I don't even take my camera out in that time.Here is one where I sat for about a half hour. I was having my lunch as well though ;-)

    http://wp.me/p268wp-5d

    Good luck everyone.

    M.

  • Laurie January 31, 2012 02:05 am

    Great advice, and great video - keep it up!

  • RE: Matjaz Question January 31, 2012 01:51 am

    Matjaz. That is called "exposure bracketing". It is a pretty common feature on newer cameras, but it is not available on all models. Without knowing your exact camera, it is hard to tell if your camera supports this. I recommend that you go into your user manual and check for this feature. I am guessing that you want to do this to take an HDR shot...another way to subtly over / under expose an image is to manipulate a single RAW image. You do not have quite the control that you do with exposure bracketing, but you should be able to draw out the highlights and shadows. Good luck!

  • Matjaz January 31, 2012 12:41 am

    Hi,

    this doesn't have anything to do with slowing down, but I still do have a question. How did you make three shots one after another automatically with different exposure? Is this only a high end DSLR camera feautre?

    Thank you!

    Best regards,
    Matjaz

  • THE aSTIG @ CustomPinoyRides.com January 31, 2012 12:36 am

    Hmmm... I think I should do this. So far there are very few people who do this in my line of Photography.

    I do Car Photography for http://CustomPinoyRides.com

    I think that this will also help me not only in becoming more critical about my photos - therefore vastly improving my photography, it will also make me sort of a go-to person when it comes to Car Photography! Hmmm not bad! Thanks for the idea! It's a really big help! I'm sure if you keep this up, the same will happen to you. Keep going!

  • Charlotte January 30, 2012 10:45 pm

    You are doing great inspirational work.

    But a tripod also has the disadvantage that all the shots can become static. All shots are done from the same hight. Horizon in the same place, and a lack of composition, because you don't move the tripod back and forth, or something as simple as tilt or lift the camera angle...
    (just take a tour though Flickr and see how easy it is to tell, that the photographer was using a tripod!)
    In this particular case of your great shot here, it would have benefited from lifting the camera a bit, so you had gotten the treetop in the frame, and cut some in the bottom of the frame - or stepped some feet back..

  • Lee January 30, 2012 09:27 pm

    First off nice shot. I would say there are several schools of thought here, every photographer has a different method or approach when it comes to image capture. Ansel Adams for one would wait patiently for hours to get just the right shot and Josef Karsh would interview his subjects to get to know something about them before ever setting up to photograph them. On the other hand some images won't wait for anyone so you'd better be quick. I capture a lot of images as they appear while driving at about 60-100km/h and I have gotten a lot of very good images using a Canon G7 & G9, just saying what ever works

  • Tim January 30, 2012 09:10 pm

    Results look reasonable, at least :)

  • Gina January 30, 2012 06:31 pm

    Great Idea. I have had too many -What was I thinking!?!?- pictures. Adding video will definitely make me slow down and think before I shoot. Thank you for sharing.

  • raghavendra January 30, 2012 05:21 pm

    This is nice picture.
    Waiting for something to happen and get a clear cut shot
    shows the patience and passion!

    http://raghavendra-mobilephotography.blogspot.com/2010/09/one-fine-evening.html

  • Bharat Justa January 30, 2012 03:32 pm

    Great idea! It will also help in improving videography skills.

  • Jim January 30, 2012 01:10 pm

    I slow myself down by shooting in Manual Mode and for static subjects I focus manually

  • Robert t Wilson January 30, 2012 10:58 am

    Another way to slow down us to use manual lenses. I love using vintage gear and I find that the older fast primes can be had for close to a 1/10 th of modern AF gear. Check out my blog it's all vintage glass

  • Scottc January 30, 2012 10:20 am

    An interesting technique, anything that makes you slow down and think (assuming there is time for the shot) is worth the while.

    Probably the only time I've ever really slowed down, and the point was a steady shot, was when shooting stained glass hand held.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/lendog64/sets/72157626664460062/

  • Chris January 30, 2012 06:53 am

    Or shoot LF...

  • Mr Grumpy January 30, 2012 06:24 am

    Interesting but it would appear that you left a vital piece of equipment at home, no matter how cold it might have been, vital particularly if you are going to record yourself: kleenex. Otherwise it's rather off-putting for the listener.

    You can still buy packets, I believe, in most supermarkets.

  • Erik Kerstenbeck January 30, 2012 04:04 am

    Hi

    Thanks for the advice! I usually try to slow down by using a tripod and if I dont have one, I inagine thtat I have one, Forces me to stop snapping and start composing. This simple shot of Chicago's bean took over twenty minutes - so what! It allowed me to really look at this amazing sculpture!

    Cheers, Erik

    http://kerstenbeckphotoart.wordpress.com/2012/01/26/two-worlds-the-bean-people/

  • Holly January 30, 2012 03:28 am

    I really enjoyed your video. It was nice to see the process behind the end result. Loved how the finished photo came out. Great job!

  • Mridula January 30, 2012 02:43 am

    What a novel idea. But sometimes the trips I take are at such a breathtaking speed that I need to click.

    http://blogs.gonomad.com/traveltalesfromindia/2012/01/lakhmana-sand-dunes-jaisalmer-rajasthan.html

  • John January 30, 2012 02:34 am

    Thanks for the tips John! I do realize i've got a lot of work when it comes to the recording of a video and I didn't even think about doing voice overs later in post production! I could definitely try that at some point.

    I'm working on a few other ideas for videos from attempting to get into time-lapse photography to editing tutorials. All in good time tho.

    Thanks for the comment :)

  • John January 30, 2012 02:30 am

    Since it is your first video - I would offer the following
    1: keep going - I think it is great for the creative experience to teach - even via video.
    2: work on post production - you could always do a voice track later when you are warm.
    3: Steady Cam - yup they have them even for iPhones - and not expensive.

    take a look at greyscalegorilla early videos - I love the one from the airport.

    Thank you for the opportunity to see this fieldwork - gets me thinking I should do the same.

  • Patrick B January 30, 2012 02:18 am

    Very nice picture ! I am the worst at slowing down, with that said I will give this a shot... Anything will slow me down at this point

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