Do You Manually Focus or Use Auto Focus? [POLL]

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Time for a quick dPS reader poll – this time its about how you focus your shots – manual or auto…. or both depending upon the circumstance?

Do You Use Manual or Auto Focusing?

View Results

Feel free to tell us more about your answer (why you do what you do) in comments below.

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Darren Rowse is the editor and founder of Digital Photography School and SnapnDeals. He lives in Melbourne Australia and is also the editor of the ProBlogger Blog Tips. Follow him on Instagram, on Twitter at @digitalPS or on Google+.

  • idb

    Mostly auto with some manual was my answer. I don’t trust auto in all situations and lighting conditions. I don’t like the auto-focus illumination in low light either. It can really spoil any attempt at getting a candid shot. Might as well put the flash on. Also for selecting the background instead of the foreground, it’s easier even with multiple focus points available. But when I use manual I really miss the focusing screen on my 35 mm cameras. A plain matte focusing screen just doesn’t compare to the split screen.

  • mostly to all my shooting event i used manual mode because i want the camera to follow my mode and not their mode, it is nice to see good results with you controlling the camera

  • Taimoor Khan

    i was in state to shoot in auto focus but since last few months i’m taking the shots using manual focus and i found it is indeed impressing me about the picture quality and i could take the desired shot…..i got a DSLR, Thanks….

  • Joel

    I use the manual focus because when the camera is on auto, I may get 1 out of 10 pics in sharp focus.

  • All this talk about AF vs MF and no one is actually talking about the lens and dof of the shot? I use both depending on the lens. If I’m shooting somewhere high AF usually suffices but if I’m shooting with a shallow DOF and need a precise focus point then I manual it. It’s simple to be honest. My eyes arent brilliant either but I’m trying to get better than seeing the focus detail when I MF.

  • SBSK

    I am very surprised by the responses here. Especially this one, which in my opinion, is quite ignorant and condescending.

    “Using manual focus in the 21st century is like someone who stills drives a manual car. There’s really no need. There are very few situations when manual is needed. So for 99% of time I use Auto. To those who always use manual I say “let, go”.”

    Auto focus is a hindrance, not a convenience when trying to capture a fleeting moment. By the time your focal point is targeted, the moment is gone.

  • Darlene

    I’m with the rest of you with “older eyes” or just poor vision. I wish I could always use manual focus, but without my glasses I am useless (very very shortsighted) and now that I also need bi-focals, I can’t seem to look through the right part of my glasses to get a sharp focus. For me, the auto is faster and gives me a better chance of getting what I want in focus. Otherwise, the “moment” is gone by the time I push my glasses back up on my nose and then figure out which part of my glasses to look through to get a sharp focus. Long gone….

  • Zero_Equals_Infinity

    Auto focus: Useful but not always.

    I picked up a Zacuto loupe yesterday because of my desire for precise focusing for long exposure (read using 9 – 11 stop ND filters @ LO-3 / ISO 50 on my D800.) In those situations I am looking at isolation and centre of interest, and I have to make a subjective determination about what is in and out of focus. Auto-focus is not very useful to me when I am doing that.

    On the other hand, I sat down to do fine calibration for auto-focus for my lenses today, and was surprised at how accurate the auto-focus capabilities have become. Yes, an occasional hunt happens, and the time to obtain focus can be a cause of concern, but I am encouraged and want to do some bird shots to get a real sense of how well it works. My sense is, that a good auto-focus system is very useful where the situation is dynamic and the centre of interest is well known, (i.e. a bird in flight, or a race car approaching on a track.)

    So put me down in the firmly, “it depends” camp. I will use it where it helps, and discard it where it does not.

  • When it’s sunny outside, people flock to their patios for lounging, barbecues and outdoor entertaining. An auto tilt umbrella or manual tilt umbrella will keep the party going by offering umbrage when the sun’s rays get too strong. Which type should you go with? Let’s stack them up head to head.

  • in my photos i usually used MF because that is what photography is, catching subject with your emotion….

Some Older Comments

  • george macabale May 11, 2012 12:54 am

    in my photos i usually used MF because that is what photography is, catching subject with your emotion....

  • Prism Kite April 22, 2012 03:29 pm

    When it's sunny outside, people flock to their patios for lounging, barbecues and outdoor entertaining. An auto tilt umbrella or manual tilt umbrella will keep the party going by offering umbrage when the sun's rays get too strong. Which type should you go with? Let's stack them up head to head.

  • Zero_Equals_Infinity April 22, 2012 03:31 am

    Auto focus: Useful but not always.

    I picked up a Zacuto loupe yesterday because of my desire for precise focusing for long exposure (read using 9 - 11 stop ND filters @ LO-3 / ISO 50 on my D800.) In those situations I am looking at isolation and centre of interest, and I have to make a subjective determination about what is in and out of focus. Auto-focus is not very useful to me when I am doing that.

    On the other hand, I sat down to do fine calibration for auto-focus for my lenses today, and was surprised at how accurate the auto-focus capabilities have become. Yes, an occasional hunt happens, and the time to obtain focus can be a cause of concern, but I am encouraged and want to do some bird shots to get a real sense of how well it works. My sense is, that a good auto-focus system is very useful where the situation is dynamic and the centre of interest is well known, (i.e. a bird in flight, or a race car approaching on a track.)

    So put me down in the firmly, "it depends" camp. I will use it where it helps, and discard it where it does not.

  • Darlene April 21, 2012 10:58 pm

    I'm with the rest of you with "older eyes" or just poor vision. I wish I could always use manual focus, but without my glasses I am useless (very very shortsighted) and now that I also need bi-focals, I can't seem to look through the right part of my glasses to get a sharp focus. For me, the auto is faster and gives me a better chance of getting what I want in focus. Otherwise, the "moment" is gone by the time I push my glasses back up on my nose and then figure out which part of my glasses to look through to get a sharp focus. Long gone....

  • SBSK April 21, 2012 07:33 am

    I am very surprised by the responses here. Especially this one, which in my opinion, is quite ignorant and condescending.

    "Using manual focus in the 21st century is like someone who stills drives a manual car. There’s really no need. There are very few situations when manual is needed. So for 99% of time I use Auto. To those who always use manual I say “let, go"."

    Auto focus is a hindrance, not a convenience when trying to capture a fleeting moment. By the time your focal point is targeted, the moment is gone.

  • Bambi April 16, 2012 01:54 am

    All this talk about AF vs MF and no one is actually talking about the lens and dof of the shot? I use both depending on the lens. If I'm shooting somewhere high AF usually suffices but if I'm shooting with a shallow DOF and need a precise focus point then I manual it. It's simple to be honest. My eyes arent brilliant either but I'm trying to get better than seeing the focus detail when I MF.

  • Joel September 8, 2011 01:16 pm

    I use the manual focus because when the camera is on auto, I may get 1 out of 10 pics in sharp focus.

  • Taimoor Khan September 7, 2011 05:34 pm

    i was in state to shoot in auto focus but since last few months i'm taking the shots using manual focus and i found it is indeed impressing me about the picture quality and i could take the desired shot.....i got a DSLR, Thanks....

  • george July 23, 2011 12:36 am

    mostly to all my shooting event i used manual mode because i want the camera to follow my mode and not their mode, it is nice to see good results with you controlling the camera

  • idb July 19, 2011 01:48 pm

    Mostly auto with some manual was my answer. I don't trust auto in all situations and lighting conditions. I don't like the auto-focus illumination in low light either. It can really spoil any attempt at getting a candid shot. Might as well put the flash on. Also for selecting the background instead of the foreground, it's easier even with multiple focus points available. But when I use manual I really miss the focusing screen on my 35 mm cameras. A plain matte focusing screen just doesn't compare to the split screen.

  • Janice July 15, 2011 05:54 pm

    My eyes aren't very good, and often I am forced to depend upon auto focus. I take a lot of wildlife shots, and often there isn't enough time to get a good focus manually, on a moving subject. But I have found that when it is possible (I can see the subject well enough and have time), manual focus is a bit clearer. Plus, I miss shots sometimes because auto focus can't decide what to focus on - and that gets frustrating. A Whistling Kite will fly by, and auto focus is too busy zooming in and out to actually snap the shot. Or else it'll focus on a branch, instead of the bird sitting on it. So I find myself going between the two - auto and manual - even while trying to take the same shot. Often I'll take it on auto, and then if there's time, take it again on manual. This is how I discovered the clearer manual focus. That's why I voted half and half. : )

  • vyrianna July 14, 2011 05:41 pm

    I use AF. Many years ago I had a film SLR, at first I took hundreds of pictures with it and my lenses. Unfortunately over time my pictures decreased because they were ALWAYS out of focus, no matter how hard I tried to get the focusing lines to line up! It took me until recently to figure out that when I was having trouble I would play with that adjustment for glasses or lack of them, and then I would play with it more. I now think that is what may have caused my problem, but at the time I didn't have a clue. All I knew is that I was unhappy with the lack of focus in my pictures. (Yes it was so long ago, that AF wasn't available or at least not afordable for the Ricoh I purchased. The automatic winder was an accessory which I had purchased with the camera.)

  • Shane Kennedy July 14, 2011 03:08 am

    Wow - no way to read all of those great replies at once.
    I want to use manual but I wonder how accurate I am. I wear corrective glasses (and althought they aren't strong) I wonder how accurate my focusing is!
    I like to focus manual to ensure I take full advantage of DOF. However with faster moving objects or if I am unsure i do use autofocus a reasonable amount of time.

  • Tim July 13, 2011 05:27 pm

    Depends which lens I want to use. The Pentacon 50mm f/1.8 doesn't give me much choice!

  • Geoffrey Parsons July 12, 2011 09:42 pm

    99% of the time I use manual, I want to tell the camera what I want it to do, not let the camera try to tell me what it wants to do.

  • Christine Rector July 12, 2011 05:07 am

    I always keep a 2x converter behind my 28-300 lens, so manual focus is a must. i do a lot of birds and a lot of macro.

  • Jessie July 12, 2011 03:55 am

    I use auto more often because I own a super-zoom which is a pain to try to manual focus. I have to repeatedly push a button up or down to focus. Plus, the viewfinder is digital instead of optical so when it's bright out and I can't see the lcd, I can't even tell if it's focused correctly. (Digital just doesn't seem to display as accurately) When using an SLR, I like manual focus.

  • Graham Carling July 11, 2011 11:28 pm

    The majority of my photography is landscape and the adjustments to the area of focus provided by the camera gives a lot of scope for selective focusing. That, in addition to exposing with aperture priority, generally covers my needs.

  • Matthew Parakas July 11, 2011 02:36 pm

    I always use Auto. Using manual focus in the 21st century is like someone who stills drives a manual car. There's really no need. There are very few situations when manual is needed. So for 99% of time I use Auto. To those who always use manual I say "let, go".

  • Guillermo de la Maza July 11, 2011 09:10 am

    Since half of my lenses predate AF, I usually shoot in Manual mode. Only when am taking snapshots rather than photos, is when I do resort to AUTO or Program modes.

  • Shams Naved July 10, 2011 02:54 pm

    I used to use MF out of an EGO issue. Since I owned a DSLR, I perceived myself more advanced than those P&S users. But you all know it's silly to use MF when your AF is going to focus on the same things any way. This is good specially when you have weak eye sight.
    My recent outing to a hill station just proved how useful AF can be when it comes to taking quick pics of friends etc. I use MF only when my camera fails to focus the way I want it to focus or I have enough time to explore the creative aspect of a shot.

  • Darlene Carlo July 10, 2011 12:35 pm

    I agree with Mark too. This is about using autofocus, not auto exposure. I see nothing wrong with using auto focus - my eyes aren't perfect and auto focus has nothing to do with setting exposure. I usually use aperture priority, sometimes shutterspeed priority depending on what I'm shooting.

  • Evening July 10, 2011 09:44 am

    As flytyer57 comments - my eyes too aren't up to it. I use auto when speed required and I feel it's likely to be an accurate take. I use manual because if I use auto then I might as well be using a point and shoot!

  • Scott July 10, 2011 07:10 am

    I used to focus manually until I was diagnosed with diabetes a few weeks ago. This explained why many of my photos were soft or just slightly out of focus, even though I had adjusted the diopter on the eyepiece of the camera. The crystaline lens on the front of the eye expands and contracts throughout the day as your glucose levels go up and down. For non- diabetics it is not noticeable, but for an person with out of control blood sugar levels, it can be significant. Given that I also do a lot of macro photography, auto-focus is not always an option.
    I have since developed the habit of constantly checking the diopter adjustment while shooting, and will sometimes have to adjust it a couple of times an hour.
    So how do I know when I have the diopter adjusted correctly for my constantly changing vision? I use a Nikon D7000, and I keep the grid lines in the viewfinder turned on. I constantly check the sharpness of the gridlines, and when I see they are not sharp, I adjust the diopter accordingly. Otherwise, it's back to the view camera!

  • john michael clarke collar July 10, 2011 06:53 am

    I use a Canon T50 and a Canon T90 camera. They are both manual-focus. Most of the time I focus excellently, except when the subject suddenly moves when I am pressing the shutter button. I cannot fault the results which I normally obtain : razor-sharp images.

  • Bryan July 10, 2011 03:29 am

    I use mostly auto my eyes are not what they used to be .

  • Mark July 9, 2011 11:33 pm

    OOPS, I was so blown away that I forgot to answer the question! I shoot wildlife mostly and I really try hard for "action" shots, so auto focus is a must and center point only lets me be sure of what is being focused upon. There is no way of manually focusing while panning along with a diving eagle!!!

  • Mark July 9, 2011 11:30 pm

    The comments here REALLY SCARE ME!!!! It is amazing how many of these do not understand the question!!! So many are confusing manual mode for exposure with how they focus the lens that I think Darren might need a follow-up article that details the question better in order for the data to mean anything at all. EVERYONE ON THIS SITE FOR MORE THAN A WEEK SHOULD KNOW THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN FOCUS AND EXPOSURE!!!!! Sorry to yell, but this is mind-blowing!

  • Kheeran D July 9, 2011 10:06 pm

    I mostly use auto-focus but use manual when I feel the camera gets it wrong. Like many others I tend to use manual when doing macro. I've set my camera up so that I use the "*" button for auto-focus. This way I avoid the camera trying to refocus every time I press the shutter release.

  • Peter T July 9, 2011 10:00 pm

    I'm on auto focus most of the time except when the lens/camera become confused ( Tamron legacy I think ) I had an old 35mm SLR ( Ricoh XR1s fully manual ) with split image focusing and it worked a treat. It would be nice if split image focusing was a configurable option on DSLR cameras.

  • Mo Parker July 9, 2011 08:40 am

    I want to be in control of my images so (almost) always shoot manual. Very seldom use any other setting.
    The only way to understand the camera is by learning how the apertures and shutter speeds work (or don't
    work) together. With perseverance using manual one learns how to adjust quickly for light conditions using either aperture or shutter speed depending on what part of the subject or scene you want in focus. Manual
    focusing is critical, too unless you are happy with the camera thinking for you.

  • Tazmo July 9, 2011 07:37 am

    When I got my first camera everything was auto. Now I set my camera to manual and experiment to learn. Try manual focus with every shot, you have to have bad photos before great ones. Bring back the true art of photography. This is why most professional cameras have less auto settings. So change your aperture, I.S.O. and you shutter speeds. Most of all go manual focus create art not just a simple pic.

  • George Klein July 9, 2011 07:16 am

    Using Live Mode and a top mounted Marshall 5" monitor for most of my shots (especially landscapes) it is obvious that manual focus is my preferred focusing method. And that is helped by the Canon 5D Mark II feature to magnify up to 10 times the chosen part of the image for focusing purposes.
    Sometimes, when I don't use Live Mode I use AF.

  • john hinton July 9, 2011 05:50 am

    I use manual for macro, especially wide landscapes. I set focus on infinity and concentrate on the histogram to maximize my shots.

    For all else I have to rely upon auto, even with the viewer adjusted for my poor eyesight. I find that I cannot get the sharpness I want when relying on eyesight alone.

  • Timothy Byford July 9, 2011 02:46 am

    I usually use autofocus, except when I have a shot when there is something in the foreground - like a plant or bush, that I want to be out of focus, as sometimes the autofocus overrides the prefocussing I have done and gives me the bush in focus and main subject out of focus http://timothybyford.com/photos

  • Brian Cohen July 9, 2011 02:01 am

    I go back and forth, depending on the situation and my desire to experiment or gamble. I usually shoot sports, and in aperture mode with auto focus to get shallow depth of field to isolate my subject. If I want to avoid the chance that my subject may be out of focus due to various factors (slow lens, lens hunting in low light, person moving out of focus area, etc.), I'll shoot with a smaller aperture to increase my depth of field. If I'm taking photos of someone relatively stationary with something in the background that might steal the focus, such as a soccer goalie in front of the net, I'll use autofocus on the goalie, flick the switch to manual and stay in my spot. If I'm shooting with an element that's low contrast--water in a swim meet, for instance--I may go manual at a spot with a slightly narrower aperture than I'd prefer and wait for the swimmer to hit that area.

    By the way, don't forget to adjust the focus setting for your DSLR viewfinder. And, as with a few other posters, I'd love to see split-screen come back.

  • Dave July 9, 2011 01:56 am

    I shoot manually on all of my cameras, even the pocket size P&S I have with me always. But occasionally when I need to shoot something fast, I change to auto. Last night on my bike ride 3 Roadrunners scrambled across the bath and landed in a fallen dead tree. Sun was just going down and I knew these guys would be moving for move cover. So I quickly switched my little Lumix to auto and got off 3 nice shots before they got into more brush. No way I'd have been able to adjust manually (last shots manually were shot on a pier just after sunset the night before).

  • CeeJay July 9, 2011 12:13 am

    The reason I mainly use Auto focus, because I wear varifocal lenses and can not trust my eye sighe to get it sharp. Macro I have the focus setting on Manual, but I really struggle

  • VIVEKANANDAN P A (VIVI) July 9, 2011 12:13 am

    I USUALLY DO AUTO FOCUS INCLUDING BIRDS IN FLIGHT
    BUT DO A LITTLE MANUAL FOCUS IN MY MACRO WORKS
    REGARDS

  • Don Johnson July 8, 2011 10:40 pm

    I want control of what I am doing. I enjoy the challenge of striving for perfection.

  • Julius Chilala July 8, 2011 10:03 pm

    I use a canon 450D and my challenge has been to achieve sharp focus. i don't know when the image is in focus. I also have challenges when the subject is in motion; and when I am taking street photographs.

  • Zero-Equals-Infinity July 8, 2011 09:26 pm

    Macro - manual always.

    Street - auto always.

    Landscape / architectural... manual when on a tripod always; handheld ... manual 70%; auto 30%.

    Studio / portraiture ... manual 50%; auto 50%.

    Low light ... manual always.

  • Peter Allchin July 8, 2011 08:57 pm

    Most of my photo shooting is macro so I tend to use manual focus. I also use manual when, for example, there are a number of geese or ducks by a lake and so it is easier to manually focus on the subject. Auto focus in this situation will often focus on the wrong bird.

  • Bernard Sawdon July 8, 2011 08:37 pm

    I dont use Manual as I dont know how to go about setting my Canon 35 d SLR UP

  • Sii July 8, 2011 08:20 pm

    Amazing results, I never imagined the overwhelming majority would be auto.

    I use manual almost all of the time. I like to put the focus exactly where I want it and so I find manual a little quicker and easier. The 5 or so % I'm in auto is when my subject is carvorting around the living room or park! Then I praise the moden camera for the fact that it can take good shots without me. Perhaps some legs on the bottom could be the camera's next revelation, it could frame the shot too then, so I could just sit back with a G& T and take the credit!

  • Vicky July 8, 2011 07:12 pm

    Mostly auto, manual only with macro and when using film camera.

  • Abel July 8, 2011 06:25 pm

    When I started with photography, my camera is all manual. When I bought my first digital camera, with the 18 -55 mm lens, I always use auto but for 70-300mm, I use manual because most of the time, when I set to auto, it keeps back and forth trying to focus, so to be sure, I focus manually.

  • Anup July 8, 2011 06:23 pm

    I tend to use mostly auto since i am not confident with manual settings

  • iZakben July 8, 2011 06:19 pm

    Auto for everything except portraits and casually when I shoot macro !

  • vinoviya July 8, 2011 06:16 pm

    i like to use manual. but i dont have manual focus in my canon A495 powershot camera. Don't know how to focus manually in that.

  • Chas July 8, 2011 05:45 pm

    Almost always use Auto unless there isn't enough light to do so, or the camera's just not hitting the spot I'm after. The manufacturers have put enough time and money in at this point that Auto works really well in most applications.

  • Man In Black AZ July 8, 2011 04:55 pm

    The subject matter normally controls if I use auto. Sports and fast moving subject recorded in jep are auto.
    If there is time to setup and view the static subject then it is manual or zone useing f stop zone depth.

  • alex gabriel July 8, 2011 04:49 pm

    I would really love to do it manually.. I am a beginner (3 weeks old) and still learning a lot with my D3100 (entry level).

    I would really love to learn from you guys.. Especially the tips and the dos and don'ts... and have good friends with this hobby.. :-)

  • Srinivas July 8, 2011 04:38 pm

    I use manual focus set to infinity, most of the time when I am shooting macro with high magnification like this shot for example: http://www.flickr.com/photos/gsrini/5504967227/in/photostream

    I also use it for night landscape shots like star trails, when there is minimal light and autofocus won't work. I just set it to just before infinity.

  • Swissjon July 8, 2011 04:18 pm

    I tend to use manual focus for non-moving subjects.. I use the hyper focal distance or adjust the DoF so that I get the shot I want.. When I'm shooting moving subjects I will autofocus because it's faster and more accurate, except in poor lighting, when I revert back to manual..

  • Krishnam July 8, 2011 03:34 pm

    Auto for all ocassions except Macro and recoding videos on DSLR

  • Cheryl July 8, 2011 03:10 pm

    I use Manual for 98% of my shots as I want to learn and grow as a photographer and not rely on the camera to do the work for me. I want to get it as right 'in camera' as I possibly can. I place no judgement on those that use Auto only, or predominantly, but, for me, I want to learn what settings to use that will give me the ultimate results. I only use Auto if I want to take a quick candid shot or where I know I will not have the time to select the settings I need. I guess I like to challenge myself and it is a personal preference.

  • Mindy July 8, 2011 02:12 pm

    I use auto-focus most of the time, simply because I can't see focus detail well enough without a split prism. I'd love to go back to the split prism system!

  • Michael July 8, 2011 02:11 pm

    I have an eye disease that took from me depth perception and fine focus, everything is blurry to me all the time even with glasses. I see 4 of everything and have to discern which of the 4 is the real thing.

    Because of this I gave up photography in the late 80s after working as a professional for many years. In the late 90s when autofocus and digital at the higher end was starting to get useful ($50k range) I came back and have been completely digital and auto focus since then.

    I do shot with a few manual lenses like the Canon tilts and do it by the numbers, after so many years many things are instinctive and in low light situations but otherwise if the camera can't get it right, I find another way to get the shot.

    I thought I'd lost access to my passion and profession, auto focus gave both back to me and I'm grateful.

  • Lawrence Baker July 8, 2011 01:03 pm

    I use a range of Pentax manual primes with K5 focus confirmation and adjusted for shake reduction of the particular focal length.

  • Fandi P. N. July 8, 2011 12:33 pm

    I use auto focus when it is easier to focus with auto focus, I use manual focus when it is easier to to focus with manual focus.

  • Lyman Walker July 8, 2011 12:23 pm

    I almost always use auto focus because my eyes are no longer good enough to manually focus.

  • James Edgar July 8, 2011 12:18 pm

    With the camera (Canon 50D) on a tripod, I use live view and manual focus. Handheld, I usually use autofocus, but sometimes manually tweek the image.

  • UB July 8, 2011 12:05 pm

    Depending on the kinda photo I'm taking whether I used the manual setting on my D7000 or my autofocus. If I'm really serious about getting the kind of image that is outstanding color and compositional right I will use my manual setting. If I'm in a hurry I just let the camera do the work for me. There is a difference.When shooting in manual I make sure all my camera settings are the way I want them to be and in autofocus I'm not so concerned and usually in a hurry. More exciting things happen in autofocus. UB productions

  • Darlene Carlo July 8, 2011 12:00 pm

    Same reason as flytyer57...My eyes are not as sharp and with glasses that include progressive bifocal I am sometimes not sure if I am looking through my glasses in the correct area and find unless I'm doing close-up macro photography I take sharper photos with autofocus.

  • Milosh July 8, 2011 11:46 am

    I'm turning off the autofocus using the shutter button more and more, and the using AF-ON button instead, this eliminates focus hunting a lot of the time. If you try this for a while you'll really like it.

    I also use live view with a magnified image on the lcd screen for manual focusing, much better than my eye can do through the viewfinder.

  • Hari Krishnan July 8, 2011 11:42 am

    You should add options lime Programme Assist Mode too. You will find more trigger happy people in this region. Since it was not available, I voted in half auto and half manual.

  • neuroanatomist July 7, 2011 03:19 am

    @bk - What you're 'missing' is that the stock focusing screens in current dSLRs are microetched to enhanced brightness, to make them more 'consumer-friendly' (consumer lenses are usually slow, variable aperture zooms and the microetching overcomes the dim viewfinder with a slow lens). One consequence of that is that through the viewfinder, you see the depth of field you'd get with an f/2.8 lens (closer to f/2.5, actually). With your f/1.8 lens, your actual DoF is smaller than the DoF you see in the viewfinder, so what may look in focus actually is outside of the DoF. Using Live View will show you the true DoF of a fast lens. Some cameras (5DII, 60D) uave user-replaceable focusing screen (I have the Eg-S super precision matte screen for my 5DII, which is much better for manual focus with lenses faster than f/2.8 - the image seems to 'snap' into focus, unlike what you get with the stock screen). There are 3rd party vendors that make screens for the T1i (e.g. KatzEye, Brightscreen).

  • BK July 7, 2011 01:50 am

    I mostly use AF because without a split focusing screen and the prime 50mm set to f1.8, I can't seem to be able to get what I see in the viewfinder. Maybe there is something I'm missing but most of the time, everthing seems clear in finder but get totally blurry at the output.

    On the other hand, I strictly use manual for taking videos with my T1i. When focusing through the LCD screen, it is quite precise...

    If anyone has any advice on how to correctly use manual focus without split screen, I'd like to read it ;)

    BTW, do you use focussing screens? Which ones? Split? Diamond? Which brand? Do you find them useful?

  • Geoff July 6, 2011 04:18 pm

    If I am "shooting" horses in action; such as jumping or crosscountry I will prefocus on the obstacle before the horse arrives using the "one shot" setting on my Canon, I also use this setting for handheld landscape work to pick a point suitable for my centre of focus. The only time I use manual focus is for macro work and landscape photography on a Tripod.
    I use to use a Loupe and "live view" for this sort of work which is fantastic until I lost it and haven't got round to replacing it yet.

  • fon July 6, 2011 01:58 am

    I only use auto when I don't want to bump up my iso over 1600. When I am on tour and time is limited to shoot the inside of palaces, churches or when such event requires too much speed and not enough time to focus.

  • mactire July 5, 2011 10:47 pm

    For snapshots I use autofocus, for "real" photography mostly manual.
    Manual has the advantage of more control, and if you're used to it reasonably quick. When using autofocus I use centrum weight AF.

  • Maurice Prokaziuk July 5, 2011 12:46 pm

    I do about 50/50. Manual for close ups, low light, shallow depth of field and when I have a lot of time. Auto for those hurried shots and high apperature settings.

  • alyacroft July 5, 2011 11:28 am

    I usually use Auto unless it's something that is hard to get the right focus on, such as tall grass fronds and the like. It's much quicker and since I'm learning I'd rather learn more about other functions of my camera before I start to master manual focusing. I'd like to have at least a *few* good photos ^_^

  • Cynthia July 5, 2011 03:16 am

    Autofocus. My vision in my 50's is even less reliable than it was in my 30's

  • babumussa July 5, 2011 01:52 am

    I used to autofocus about evething, until I got into macro. I recentrly bought an M42 adapter to my d90, so now it is manual focus and no metering!

  • Metta Witari July 5, 2011 12:42 am

    I use both, half manual, half auto. I use auto to capture the fast-moving objects like babies and animal, I use MF too

  • EmSee July 4, 2011 11:00 pm

    Canon 5d MkII - Canon 24-70 2.8L (mainly)
    I always choose and find auto focus in normal conditions, incl lowish light, is more than adequate. Hyper critical and special situations (very low light/flash/large aperture, HDR work etc) then I check/adjust/lock focus manually but always use auto as a starting pont if poss.

  • Martyn Holden July 4, 2011 10:33 pm

    I always use manual setting; As the compensation changes as I move around so does the exposure settings. i have to change. I have learned that I can keep the custom settings as a constant (like sunny or cloudy) and use the manual settings to captivate what expressions I want in my photos. I am now working on my composition, as I learn that the composition will always intrigue more and more excitement for me and forever grow.

  • George Johnson July 4, 2011 10:17 pm

    Like most others, depends. Most of the time for bog-standard landscapes with huge DOF, then it's auto. When I am doing HDRs, or very long ( 2 min + ) exposures through 8-stop NDs then you have no choice, it has to be manual. When you get to do more creative shots, like macros or tight street shots with tight DOF, then it's almost always manual.

  • ROBBIN July 4, 2011 08:23 pm

    Except for macro and digital zoom shots, I use the autofocus option since I don't really understand how to accurately manually use the PASM manual focus options on my camera. :(

  • Dodie Remedios July 4, 2011 02:52 pm

    I normally use Auto, I'm the type that likes to take pictures on the fly, when you do not have a lot of time to fiddle with the settings. The technology behind IS and settings like AV, TV and sometimes even P mode makes it easier us amateurs to takes these shots quickly and cleanly. I only switch to manual when I have time on my hands (a lot of time), or when the situation calls for it (e.g. macro shots), especially when your camera's auto system is not cooperating, then you really have to go fully manual.

  • Keith Walker July 4, 2011 12:10 pm

    I user Aupo for quite a lot but for macro and very selective focus I use Manual

  • Joe Shatz July 4, 2011 11:23 am

    Wear specticles and use a Nikon special eyepiece in my viewfinder. Still dont trust my own vision.
    Joe

    [Any ideas anyone .Please ! ]

  • Mei Teng July 4, 2011 10:38 am

    Always manual focus.

  • james cannam July 4, 2011 09:18 am

    I have a Samsung NX10, and the electronic viewfinder doesn't give enough resolution to get the focus spot on. Therefore I rely on the autofocus, just moving the focus point to exactly where I want it.

  • Jerry Kirkhart July 4, 2011 05:52 am

    I use aperture priority unless i am taking photos of birds in the air, and then I sure shutter priority. However, when I shoot tide pools (ie. nudibranchs), I almost always use exclusively manual, as I want that control over the invertebrates I photograph. See http://www.flickr.com/photos/jkirkhart35/5843469215 for an example. Sure do enjoy your site and learn a lot from your continued emails. Thanks.

  • Isoterica July 4, 2011 05:20 am

    Manual or Automatic is based on what I am trying to achieve. In macro photography the lens can do a lot of front to back seaching and choose the portion of the subject you don't want in focus like the outer edge of a rose petal rather than the center if you desire the center. Some things require the eye to choose. In street photography if you are 'zone' focusing so to speak.. you set your camera on what you want [focus based on distance] manually and either walk your subject into frame or let them walk to your chosen spot and shoot. It's often not convenient to stop and focus, even auto focus as a moving individual could walk past you in that amount of time as well as auto focus might choose their shirt rather than the details of their face. There are other times when auto focus is necessary, as you can read above, with bad eyesight, or maybe just to grab a shot before you lose it. I don't think there should be prestige, also mentioned above, based on how you focus. All of the adjustments are there for you to choose the correct one for your shot. Sometimes that is doing it manually.. and sometimes that is letting the camera sight it down.

  • Terry Straehley July 4, 2011 05:16 am

    I have my 5D set so that it focuses with the * button on the back, not with the shutter release. I normally press that to auto focus. If I really need to focus accurately, as for a macro shot, I use the live view and expand it by five or ten for accurate manual focus.

  • William July 4, 2011 05:05 am

    Primary lens is UWA so I manually set Hyperfocal distance which allows me to compose (poorly) and shoot quickly without worrying about focusing the lens.

  • gmfolio July 4, 2011 04:55 am

    Earlier I had a Nikon D5000 in which many lens doesn’t support auto focus as you guys know, so there was no option but doing it manually. Reluctantly this camera taught me how to MF.

    Initial few days, in fact few months I struggled a lot to handle it properly when it comes to 50mm lens or any good aperture lens, but the fun began from there. I had to take many shots for one pose to make it perfect focused, but it was really fu¬n doing thing than feeling uneasy or embarrassed.

    Now I have a Nikon D90, but I still those days!

    http://gmfolio.com

    Click here to Join my FB page

  • VINOD KUMAR July 4, 2011 04:42 am

    To capture an image quickly i feel better with auto . Otherwise manual focusing is good and im enjoying well by that.

  • Mike July 4, 2011 04:23 am

    Mostly auto, also, D90 has option that follows initial focus point w shutter half-pressed. Manual if dark, or know will be a fast moving subject moving thru a known point, or if I'm doing a portrait type. Hmm - maybe 50-50 after all.
    Like most of the settings, I've learned what the camera can and can't do, and am ready to jump in.

  • THE aSTIG @ CustomPinoyRides.com July 4, 2011 03:48 am

    I do car photography for my website http://CustomPinoyRides.com.

    When I shoot strobist style, since I only have one flash, I shoot multiple exposures and then just combine them on photoshop. Having said that, I usually autofocus the first shot, and so as not to disrupt the focus which has already been set, I put it on manual and then fire away for the next exposures. Such is the technique I use for car photography.

  • jophoto July 4, 2011 03:30 am

    Autofocus when handheld, and a combination of manual and auto when using a tripod. On a tripod I most always use live view and magnify the image to get the manual focus where I want it. Canon's auto focus works well, but sometimes it's too much work to pick the focus point, manual is quicker.

  • Justin S July 4, 2011 03:25 am

    I would like to use manual more often, but I can't really see enough through the viewfinder to get manual. My eyes are fine (20/20) and I have the diopter set for my eyes. Its just that the view is so small I don't see how people can know if they have it exactly focused. What am I doing wrong?
    fyi, I use a Nikon D7000

  • Daniel July 4, 2011 03:18 am

    I tend to use auto focus on P except when I am shooting Macro & Still life, I take it out of auto every now and then, when I am trying new things out :-D

    I use a Canon 1000D with the kit lens and a Tamrom 70-300

    Please check my flickr, comments always welcome, good or bad :-D

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/spinnykid/

  • danfoy July 4, 2011 03:10 am

    Having said that, I have to admit that when I'm shooting for fun, I do find myself using manual-focus film systems. Perhaps it's that manual focusing works better when you have a limited number of exposures and are using gear that wasn't designed to be used in a rush.

  • danfoy July 4, 2011 03:06 am

    Am I missing some sort of prestige that's supposed to go with focusing manually? I can understand things like wanting full control over exposure for your shots, but I don't really see why anyone would want to override autofocus in practically any situation other than perhaps macro.

    The DSLRS I own have AF-ON buttons on the back, which I have set as the sole way of engaging autofocus, rather than the camera hunting when half-pressing the shutter button. Focus-hunting is the only thing I can think of that would count against autofocus. No-one can focus faster or more acurately than autofocus, especially now that DSLRs come with focusing screens made for brightness rather than ease of manual use.

    I use Olympus 35mm film cameras and Bronica medium format gear, neither of which has autofocus, and I consider having to focus manually more of a pain than anything. It can feel like a fun novelty, and has a nice hands-on feel but it certainly isn't something that I do to create better images, and isn't something that I'd bother even attempting without a split prism.

    I also have an old film EOS 5 - one of the Canon models that selected focus point based on which point you were looking at. Now that was some freaky tech.

  • dok July 4, 2011 02:10 am

    When travelling, shooting some family event... well when time is a matter, I shoot auto with modern equipment. but when I go out solo for a shoot session I grab, almost every time, prime MF lenses (M42). Going manual makes me progress a lot.

  • Michael Moore July 4, 2011 01:40 am

    I'm using Zeiss lenses, so it's all manual focus for me. Got a split prism Katzeye screen for my 7D which helped a lot.

  • Roberta July 4, 2011 12:13 am

    I'd love to be able to focus manually but my vision is not that great, even with my glasses on I just can't nail focus so I rely on auto. Hardly an ideal situation but I don't know how to work around it.

  • Geoff July 3, 2011 11:01 pm

    I use mainly autofocus but I have my Canon 50D set so that the * button, under my right thumb, initiates autofocus, not the shutter half press (custom function). I use only the centre focus point, except occasionally in, say, a portrait shoot I will choose another, single, point which is nearer my sitters eyes. If I were to use all focussing points. I would have no idea where my camera was focussed.
    I also use hyperfocal distance information in a landscape shot, but still using centre point autofocus to focus at the required distance.

  • Donna S July 3, 2011 10:52 pm

    I ALWAYS manual focus on macro, and almost always on a tripod, but it's very much half/half!

  • scottc July 3, 2011 10:51 pm

    Auto nearly 100% of the time, my near and far vision are both off so even wearing glasses when I shoot doesn't help.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/lendog64/

  • Darko Geres July 3, 2011 10:29 pm

    I use both way.
    Manual is very often better solution cos' it provide more control over exact spot on which I want to focus, and as we all know there are situation where auto focus don't work well.
    In situation where auto focus work well and satisfactory I use it cos it's quicker.

  • Dusty B July 3, 2011 10:29 pm

    I like using manual for the control and speed. I find that if I use auto focus, it will either take too long (by long, I mean seconds) or focuses differently than I would prefer.

  • Robert Vitale July 3, 2011 10:15 pm

    I use manual focus when there are allot of objects in view and want to pick out the main subject. I use auto focus when focusing is critical in timing. Such as capturing an insect in flight of feeding and don't have the time to focus manually. Other wise I like auto most of the time.

  • Martyn Holden July 3, 2011 10:01 pm

    Auto focus with the focal point allways on the center dot on my camer. Focus then correct the compensation.

  • John July 3, 2011 09:50 pm

    Yes.....I must agree with Harry.....I mean.....who focuses nowadays?? It's so old fashioned. Blurry is best!

  • Harry July 3, 2011 09:26 pm

    I don't focus ever.....I prefer out of focus shots. Clients seem happy with them.....

  • David July 3, 2011 09:16 pm

    I have a 7D, why would I even consider manual? :o)

  • Paula July 3, 2011 08:14 pm

    I mostly shoot in auto, but often using selected AF points. I have a short sighted eye and a far sighted eye which causes confuses, so I often have to rely on auto.

    I use manual on my film cameras. Obviously!

  • Chris July 3, 2011 07:04 pm

    Manual Focus on D7000 with 60mm/105mm Macro, auto with most other lenses.
    and Manual Focus on my NIKON FM2a

  • Pravin Indranama July 3, 2011 05:30 pm

    Always prefer Manual focus because of my habits. I started photography with a Yashica FX-7 SLR, so still taste the feeling of rotating the focusing ring. (also I miss the feeling of cranking Film Advance Lever :D )

  • neil July 3, 2011 05:28 pm

    ahh i always use the camera settings and NO tripod i find the challenge of taking a picture as i am looking at it . and i never use programs to enhance . that takes away the skill

  • Abhijeet July 3, 2011 05:06 pm

    For me it is very difficult to manual focus with the smallish viewfinder of my A200 and with my glasses on. I use manual focus only in complicated situations.

  • Jacqui July 3, 2011 04:14 pm

    I use auto all the time. I do want to learn how to use manual, but somehow never get round to sitting down with the camera and book and working through it (I have nikon for dummies) and auto is so quick and easy. I can't tell you how much better I feel reading these replies. I thought all you guys would be using manual all the time.

  • S.krishna July 3, 2011 03:49 pm

    My eye sight is suspect. I prefer auto. I just shoot more photos to make sure.

  • Brandon July 3, 2011 02:50 pm

    I use nikon glass on my micro four thirds camera, so I am "forced" to manual focus. I actually like manual focusing because it is cool to see the change in depth of field (when using a 1.x lens). Also, when I do macro, or tripod pictures I manual focus. However, on the rare occasion that I use my kit lens, I will use Auto.

  • Alessandra July 3, 2011 01:45 pm

    It depends on the picture. For example for macros I prefer manual, in the streets it's not only autofocus but continuous too. If the camera insists in focusing not where I want but on something else I switch to manual although the easiest way to solve this is to use a single point for autofocus and then reframing.

  • Linda July 3, 2011 01:19 pm

    I take a lot of shots of sports - baseball and swimming. Auto focus in sports mode is consistently the best way for me to capture shots.

  • Nora July 3, 2011 12:40 pm

    Until November 2006, my vision was extremely poor. Whether with glasses or contacts, I still couldn't trust my eyes to focus. I was SOOOO happy when auto-focus cameras came around! Even though I had Lasik in 2006, my vision is still not really something to write home about, so I still don't trust that what I'm seeing is in focus. I figure the folks who came up with the auto-focus lenses knew what they were doing. So yes, I use auto-focus 99% of the time. The only time I don't is when photographing fireworks, then I turn AF off and set it to infinity.

    A couple of people mentioned split-focus. I had forgotten about that! I had a camera sometime in the 70s that had that split-focus thingy. I think it was some sort of 110 Instamatic, believe it or not. Even with my bad eyesight, it made focusing a lot easier.

  • Rich Copley July 3, 2011 12:32 pm

    I recently got out one of my favorite old lenses, Nikkor 85mm f/2, which I have had for more that 20 years but essentially stopped using when I got into DSLRs. It, of course, has gotten me reacquainted with manual focus, which I am really liking. Sometimes auto-focus can be frustrating, and this experience has reminded me that there is another option, as if just using some great old glass wasn't enough.

  • Matt July 3, 2011 12:09 pm

    I do about half and half, Mainly because only one of my lenses even has Auto!

  • Robert July 3, 2011 11:26 am

    It depends on the situation. if I have time to do it right, I use manual on a tripod, if I have to act quickly I use AF (center point) handheld.

    Since I shoot manual frequently I bought the Canon precision mate eg-s screen and am sad to say it's not all that good. Shooting with live view enlarged with a cable remote works way better and doesn't interfere with lenses slower than f/2.8 like the eg-s screen does. Maybe I'll try one of those Haoda or Brightscreen microprism split circle screens I've read about?

  • Kelly Jones July 3, 2011 11:15 am

    I shoot mostly live bands.. (as opposed to dead ones) and with the smoke, bad lighting, and my eyes always adjusting.. I trust my 7D to focus for me ..

  • Shane July 3, 2011 11:01 am

    I use mostly manual...I find that auto focus doesn't get the focus in the right spot...well the spot I want it too anyway :).

  • Charles van Dijk July 3, 2011 10:13 am

    Mostly auto, I use my Canon70mm-200mm most of the time for outdoor photography. With the Macro 50-50. The wide angle 10mm-20mm most of the time manual from a tripod.

  • Ag517 July 3, 2011 10:03 am

    I rarely use auto. I feel more sure of my shots are good when using my cam in manual mode???

  • Jean-Pierre July 3, 2011 09:32 am

    M42 via adapter.. so manual all the way!

  • Randy Roberts July 3, 2011 09:21 am

    I've recently started using manual focus more often due to a new 50mm lens that has a auto/manual mode. I really enjoy this feature.

  • Boštjan July 3, 2011 09:15 am

    Manual all the way! All the lenses I have are old manual Nikkors and some russian ones so it's the only choice :). I like 'em because some have unique character. All are not as sharp as some AF lenses but have great color rendering or unique bokeh which I like.

  • John Puett July 3, 2011 08:39 am

    I have pretty bad eyesight, so I trust my DSLR as much as I can. But sometimes it isn't contrasty enough, so I use the manual approach. I miss the old split focus thingy.

  • Jinnymaer July 3, 2011 08:37 am

    I use auto for sports or action shots, bird & nature shots that require fast focusing (I too want to get a split focusing screen) and "everyday" pictures but when I'm using my tele extender with my 70 - 300 zoom or landscapes I use manual. I'm trying to get back in the manual mode.

  • Will McA July 3, 2011 08:29 am

    I use auto... I set the camera to manual focus, but use auto-focus-lock to set the focus. I don't see how, without a focussing screen, or distance markings on the focus wheel I can possibly get a better focus by eye, that my camera does.

    But I used to use manual with my 35mm SLR (It had no autofocus), and I do have a sigma lens with distance markings on the wheel, handy for finding infinity in the dark... other than that, never manual.

  • qaqwex July 3, 2011 08:28 am

    Manual for macro, panorama, on tripod and live view, and pre-focus on a point to catch action
    AF for most other shots

    Camera - Nikon D300

  • Michael July 3, 2011 08:27 am

    I only have manual focus lenses!

  • Toni Aull July 3, 2011 08:11 am

    Auto focus on Nikon D5000 and auto-focus on my canon powershot SX30 IS

  • William M. July 3, 2011 07:21 am

    Interesting to see the results. When I am professionally shooting, I tend to use AF more as my eyesight is poor for detail without glasses and find looking through the viewfinder with glasses difficult. Contacts irritate my eyes after so long, so shooting a wedding, I can't rely on contacts to last me the entire day.

  • Dave July 3, 2011 07:18 am

    I said mostly autofocus with a little manual, but then I remembered true auto is not what I use. I usually leave my camera set to the "P" option and use the thumbwheel to adjust speed or aperture. Usually I take the camera's settings as a starting point, but play with aperture a lot, especially shooting flowers or scenic shots. Shooting wild birds is one of my specialties and I can't auto focus fast enough a lot of the time to get the shot.

  • Brent July 3, 2011 07:07 am

    My leica M series is the only camera I use so I only ever manual focus.

  • pat anderson July 3, 2011 07:04 am

    I use autofocus most of the time. I blame it on astigmatism. It's pretty necessary to go autofocus when shooting photos of migrating warblers: I set the autofocus to only do the centre dot (because I really don't care to have the overlapping leaf in focus) and just try to follow the birds as they flit about eating insects, or stopping by for a drink or a bird bath.

  • Adrian July 3, 2011 07:02 am

    About 70% auto and 30% manual.

  • Reid July 3, 2011 07:01 am

    Mostly auto when the subject or the distance allows. Manual for flowers and insects in macro. It's only manual with an older Sigma 400mm lens.

  • Vince July 3, 2011 06:55 am

    I try to use manual focus as much as possible, though sometimes find it tough with wider shots as my eyesight isn't the best (although a lot of photographers I know also seem to have bad eyesight. Photoshop hours!) When I do sports events though, have to use auto since it is really fast paced action (mma sport mainly)

  • Bryan July 3, 2011 06:53 am

    i've only used manual focus on a modern camera once when i was using a nikon and thought the autofocus was broken (little switch next to the lens) it had been many many years since i'd manualy focused an SLR, slows you down a bit.......

  • Mike Woods July 3, 2011 06:46 am

    I use manual when shooting with my old "nifty-fifty", as the lens is from the pre-digital days and doesn't autofocus on my camera. All other work is usually done with autofocus, although the 50 mm lens has yielded some of my best shots.

  • Lu July 3, 2011 06:40 am

    I use manual for fireworks, set it at infinity and that's it, also for clouds, sunsets...something auto has trouble focusing on. I may also use manual when I'm zeroing in on something specific like a bird and the auto focus is not getting that one thing, like is eye, in focus. If I'm getting glare off of a window, and the auto focus is going nuts jumping between that and what I'm after outside, I'll switch to manual.

  • Antony Northcutt July 3, 2011 06:38 am

    I think its the difference between 'taking photos' and 'making photos'.

  • Bill July 3, 2011 06:37 am

    Mostly auto because I haven't gotten the chance to pick up a split focusing screen yet.....after that it's going to be mostly auto!!!

  • Sarah @ TM2TS July 3, 2011 06:36 am

    I'm mostly taking pictures of kids, so it helps to use the auto. They move so fast that the camera can focus and adjust faster than I can. PLUS, what looks crisp to me could be blurry, because I have a smudge on my glasses.

  • Susan F. July 3, 2011 06:28 am

    I always always shoot manual focus. For me, it takes longer for the auto to adjust to what I'm shooting than for me to adjust myself. Its just easier for me. Manual all the way!

  • Burt July 3, 2011 06:28 am

    The poll doesn't really allow me to say "whichever is more appropriate for the shot." I almost always use manual for studio shots, where I control the environment and am usually on a tripod. Conversely, I almost always use auto when out in the field, where things and people are moving around much more fluidly.

    I suppose it actually comes down to "I use manual focus when on a tripod, and auto focus if handheld."

  • Yeelen July 3, 2011 06:20 am

    Mostly autofocus, but when it makes a mistake (or if I want something special), I use the MF.
    Here I had to correct it a bit to get the right focus: http://www.flickr.com/photos/yeelenmoller/5762419744/
    (Amazing eyes alert)

  • Theresa July 3, 2011 06:09 am

    I use manual focus on my 70mm - 300mm lens, as I have a D40 and this lens doesn't autofocus, so does force me to use manual, which I am enjoying more.

    Theresa

  • Erik Kerstenbeck July 3, 2011 06:06 am

    Hi

    Good topic - if I am pressed for time I will use Auto Focus. But in most instances I will use manual focus. Especially when shooting brackets as the camera will re-focus each shot. For HDR imaging like this one, I wold never relinquish control to my Nikon!

    http://kerstenbeckphotoart.wordpress.com/2011/06/30/ready-for-a-vacation/

    Happy 4th of July and Canada Day!

  • flytyer57 July 3, 2011 06:03 am

    I usually use the auto focus on my camera because my eyes are not what they used to be. I find the auto focus on the camera can do a lot better than I can. Even with my glasses, I still have problems focusing clearly. I can get close manually, but not tack sharp which my photo's need to be.

  • Akos July 3, 2011 06:03 am

    Auto for everything except macro, panorama, nightsky, HDR, time-lapse photos. :)

  • moura AKA swampwitch July 3, 2011 05:56 am

    I often put the lens on manual and the camera on auto for long shots with the 55-250 lens. A Friend showed me that at a concert where we were doing Pics of the bands and singers. works a treat. I focus on what I want manually and then the camera fine tunes it.

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