9 Photography Ideas to Fuel Your Photographic Journey

0Comments

A Guest Post by Sergey Sus/

Ideas 1

1. Take an Overnight Photography Trip

Overnight trips with other photographers make for a great time to talk and explore photography techniques.

2. Write a How to Photography Tutorial

Writing a tutorial is the best test of how well you understand a topic. To start, pick something you feel you know really well.

3. Take Photowalk With a Group

Taking a walk with a camera is a great advice, yet taking a walk with other photographers is better advice.

Ideas 2

4. Create or Update Your Portfolio Website

A website is still the best way to display and curate your work. If you don’t have a site or portfolio – make one as cultivating your work in a single place keeps it organized.

5. Assign Yourself Photography Projects

Use a project to fuel creativity and try new concepts. For example take photographs at 1/15 shutter speed or shooting a single color only, letters of alphabet etcÖ

Ideas 3

6. Become a Subject of a Photographer

Becoming a subject of another photographer and doing some posing will put you on the other side of the camera. Give it a try even if you are a landscape photographer.

Ideas 4

7. Reverse Photography Rules

Once you know the rules – take opportunities to break them! Yes, shoot the opposite of what the rules says to do.

8. Take a Photography Workshop

There are so many workshops and so many topics – there must be a reason. Workshops are not only for beginners they are for all skill levels. I take them to improve in marketing, writing and photography.

9. Re Edit your Older Photographs

Look through photos taken some time ago. I bet that you will find some forgotten gems. Take some of the older photographs and try processing them again.

Sergey Sus is a Los Angeles based photographer telling telling real stories, individual, professional and family. Problem solver, artist and teacher. His work can be found on http://www.sergeys.us/.

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  • Scott

    #9 is a great one, worked for me a few times.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/lendog64/5204555667/

  • Eeps

    A more detailed explanation would be more educational to beginners, but a nice list nonetheless.

  • Kevinc

    No shit.

  • And Haswell processor adds also a great possibility. It is understood, WWDC 2013, after the new MacBook Air will soon ship the new MacBook Pro Retina screen is limited by the problem.

  • Rog

    Cool article. Anywhere I can find some sample assignments (re: #5)? If there’s already been an article written w/ assignments that’s great, if not, I would post a list like you guys like to do, that list some useful ‘assignments’ you can give yourself and what they intend to teach, i.e. composition, colors, lighting, portraits, anything.

  • I went on a photo shoot with an aspiring student photographer this past weekend. She is interested in landscape work. Seeing some of the shots she was taking reminded me of where I started out a few years ago. She got some better shots with the butterflies though, just luck of the position. It is different taking a look backwards instead of always looking forward. Collaborating with another photographer, even a student, can give some interesting and valuable feedback.

  • Thanks for the insightful tips. I am planning a trip to Big Bend next week and hope to get some quality landscapes. MWM

  • David J

    I love the picture of Ryholite. I love shooting there!

  • Steve Atwater

    I have developed a photography “bucket list”. It encompasses various subjects and scenarios. If I were to complete it, I will have learned much more than reading books.

  • Robbyn

    This is in response to Rog’s question above: “Cool article. Anywhere I can find some sample assignments (re: #5)?”

    Assignment #1
    Go to a used book shoppe/store and look for an old Photography workbook/textbook, something instructional from a classroom for instance. You will learn wonders, get ideas, inspiration, AND most have assignments built right in at the end of every chapter! Best of all the books are yours to write notes and keep for reference. Might require a bit of legwork but it will be worth it.

    Assignment #2
    Take your camera with you and snap some frames of the book stores you find, maybe even the shop keepers! lol

  • Got back from vacation and went right into that slump 🙂 However it’s interesting that I have been doing all of these things…so i hope to be out of that slump by the weekend.

  • Portfolios are great for inspiration, have a look at other people’s works as well.

    http://500px.com/elindaire

  • sateesh pasupuleti

    U Guys Always Fill up The Small Vaccum Whenever We Feel That .. What To Shoot Or What To Do.. Thanks A Lott DPS.

  • Jordan

    ‘Look through photos taken some time ago. I bet that you will find some forgotten gems. Take some of the older photographs and try processing them again.’

    I cry when I look back over my history and remember that I didn’t start shooting in RAW until two years ago… I didn’t even import photos before that time into my Lightroom library as it feels a waste of time for anything other than cropping 🙁

  • JBand

    I love editing old photos. Often times, I know more what to do with the photo or what is lacking in my collection after some time has passed.

Some Older Comments

  • Elindaire July 26, 2013 11:26 pm

    Portfolios are great for inspiration, have a look at other people's works as well.

    http://500px.com/elindaire

  • Rob Noel July 16, 2013 09:26 am

    Got back from vacation and went right into that slump :-) However it's interesting that I have been doing all of these things...so i hope to be out of that slump by the weekend.

  • Robbyn June 29, 2013 12:36 pm

    This is in response to Rog's question above: "Cool article. Anywhere I can find some sample assignments (re: #5)?"

    Assignment #1
    Go to a used book shoppe/store and look for an old Photography workbook/textbook, something instructional from a classroom for instance. You will learn wonders, get ideas, inspiration, AND most have assignments built right in at the end of every chapter! Best of all the books are yours to write notes and keep for reference. Might require a bit of legwork but it will be worth it.

    Assignment #2
    Take your camera with you and snap some frames of the book stores you find, maybe even the shop keepers! lol

  • Steve Atwater June 28, 2013 12:34 pm

    I have developed a photography "bucket list". It encompasses various subjects and scenarios. If I were to complete it, I will have learned much more than reading books.

  • David J June 28, 2013 11:30 am

    I love the picture of Ryholite. I love shooting there!

  • Mary White-Edwards June 28, 2013 05:11 am

    Thanks for the insightful tips. I am planning a trip to Big Bend next week and hope to get some quality landscapes. MWM

  • Cramer Imaging June 22, 2013 12:24 pm

    I went on a photo shoot with an aspiring student photographer this past weekend. She is interested in landscape work. Seeing some of the shots she was taking reminded me of where I started out a few years ago. She got some better shots with the butterflies though, just luck of the position. It is different taking a look backwards instead of always looking forward. Collaborating with another photographer, even a student, can give some interesting and valuable feedback.

  • Rog June 22, 2013 06:56 am

    Cool article. Anywhere I can find some sample assignments (re: #5)? If there's already been an article written w/ assignments that's great, if not, I would post a list like you guys like to do, that list some useful 'assignments' you can give yourself and what they intend to teach, i.e. composition, colors, lighting, portraits, anything.

  • digiphone June 21, 2013 03:40 pm

    And Haswell processor adds also a great possibility. It is understood, WWDC 2013, after the new MacBook Air will soon ship the new MacBook Pro Retina screen is limited by the problem.

  • Kevinc June 21, 2013 02:28 pm

    No shit.

  • Eeps June 21, 2013 01:41 pm

    A more detailed explanation would be more educational to beginners, but a nice list nonetheless.

  • Scott June 21, 2013 09:25 am

    #9 is a great one, worked for me a few times.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/lendog64/5204555667/

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