6 Tips for Photographing the Churches of Europe

6 Tips for Photographing the Churches of Europe

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This last winter I had the great experience of going to Europe exclusively to visit and photograph the old Cathedrals and churches there. This trip was full of both adventure and serenity, and every day I had the opportunity to learn more about myself and my craft.

Photographing these old churches presents a very unique challenge, and it is neither a simple nor an easy challenge to master. What I did learn about this special area of photography though, equipped me for shooting in similar environments in the future.

1. Be Quiet and Respectful

By far this is the most important part about photographing within these churches was having an attitude of quiet respect. People literally come from all over the world to get a glimpse of this faith which has been in existence for over two thousand years. For many, these visits are part of personal journeys of deep meaning. Do whatever is necessary for you to maintain respect of that. Some ways to do this may be:

  • Put your camera in [S] mode. Rather than hearing a harsh clicking sound, the shutter softens the click and seems to drag the shutter. Of course, the disadvantage to using this mode is that you always have to pay attention to the speed of your shutter – elsewise you may end up with all blurry images.
  • Place priority on the story first, and the image second. If someone is praying and you want to take a photo of them silhouetted in the window, you absolutely must do whatever possible to not disturb them. Make yourself invisible. Shoot from the hip, or from further away and plan on cropping in.

2. Be deliberate with your settings

These great churches are infamously dark – almost to the point that you can try everything to get a good exposure, and the fact of the matter is, you probably can’t. A few settings to keep in mind:

  • High ISO is typically something that we choose only with great hesitance. In these places of worship, High ISO is a necessity if you want to capture an image at all. Plan on incorporating some intense post processing work to reduce the film grain of a shot.
  • Slow shutter speed is your only option for creating a decent image in this environment. And most churches do not allow tripods so, of course this means that you have to either prop your camera on something to act as a tripod [challenging to do if you are trying to be invisible], or train yourself to hold your camera steady during a very slow shutter. On a really good day, I can handhold at a 1/10.
  • Open wide your aperture as far as it will go to let in the most light you can.

3. Point, Shoot, and Move on

churches-europe.jpgUnless you have a pro-photograpers clearance, there is little chance the church curators will be pleased with you if you take several minutes to compose a shot. Remember, you don’t want to be a distraction at all. Think about the shots you want before you even lift your camera. Ask yourself:

  • How do I want to compose this image?
  • How do I need to arrange my settings?
  • How can I achieve this image in the least amount of time possible?

You may sacrifice some of the technical awesomeness for being invisible, but you may catch a h3er story for it.

4. Find the Light

The large, open windows will be your first choice of location for shot creation. Find this light and create an image using it’s contrast.

5. Use Angles

How can you give perspective to a wide open area? Use angles. Take your shot by crouching down quickly, or lifting your camera in the air and taking a shot looking down. Also, shoot between objects, arrange your shot with elements in the foreground and the background to keep the image interesting.

6. Be reflective

The shots I loved most were the ones that literally “came” to me. They were the ones I was not planning on taking. They were the ones that came when I wasn’t looking for them. Sometimes, your state of mind can actually impede your ability to create a shot. So while you are there, sit down, and take some time to be introspective. I think you may be surprised how inspired you become.

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Christina N Dickson is a visionary artist and philanthropist in Portland Oregon. Her work includes wedding photography www.BrideInspired.com and leadership with www.RevMediaBlog.com.

Some Older Comments

  • Yucika Kalvari August 11, 2011 08:36 pm

    Thanks for the tips. I'm going to Vienna on Sept and plan to take pictures of 2 old churches (St. Stefan and St. Peter). I'm very nervous now because I'm just starting to learn photography and I might not have another chance to go there again in the future. I'm reading all the comments very carefully now to help me with my shot on Sept. If somebody has ever been to those churches I mentioned above and have some special tips, it would be much appreciated if you'd like to share them here.

    thanks!

  • Susan July 20, 2011 01:13 pm

    I did my senior project for college on Sacred Spaces, and many of these tips do in fact prove to be helpful. What I've found to be helpful was to just simply talk to the people in charge. I was able to get some shots that I other wise would never have gotten if I had kept my mouth shut. I did have an advantage of working on a school project, but this might be a project that I return to in the future. I was able to get inside churches, cathedrals, a mosque, a synagogue, and temples. The only shot in my exhibition that I used a tripod for was a shot taken at dusk--an exterior shot of a church.

  • Blue Sky Photography July 19, 2011 06:31 pm

    In my time traveling Europe I never had any problems with not being allowed to use a tripod but I was limited on when I could use a flash( in Australia it seems they do not like you to use a tripod!!). To be honest, most of the time a flash is not what you want to use for quality of light and makes a tripod necessary. The main thing is to be respectful and ask! Most photographers do not do this and it is quite often the reason there are restrictions placed on us. Always think of the next photographer!!!

  • Rob July 18, 2011 11:19 pm

    I was going to mention how about a monopod but the smart readers here beat me to it :)
    if you an older photograpgher it can double as a kind of walking stick as my dad does when he goes on walkabouts.
    all the other supports , bean bag, your backpack are also good. maybe best to try and practice in similar surroundings like dark buildings to help you try different settings before you try that once in a lifetime location visit ?
    dok mentioned about jewish and islamic buidings.I will tell you that islamic buildings with some kind of heritage/history are not too difficult if they already have visitors/ tourists. outside of mosques are usually ok so long as you don't photograph people( its intrusive ) and you are polite about any request as to what you are doing ( many places are still sensitive since 9/11, especially if you don't look like a muslim ) and the prayer hall inside - absolute no no. its a very personal space( and yes I know there are photos floating around of these, but usually taken with special permission).

    the first rule was i think the most important - quiet and respectful, this is after all a working place not a tourist attraction. many of the biggest places are happy to welcome visitors provided you don't disturb anyone, and pehaps for the slightly smaller one donate some loose change. Please also be aware of your dress, many people visit as tourists dressed for the hot sun outdoors not realising that these places will expect you to be modestly dressed, so if you are in t shirt and shorts, get one of those very light pull over trousers and shirts to cover when you go in .

  • David July 16, 2011 02:29 am

    While Christina's tips are very good, her sense of respect for others is something to admire and emulate!

  • Barry Milford July 15, 2011 03:45 pm

    Last time I took photos in a cathedral the curator allowed me to use a monopod so long as it was attached to my camera, but wouldn't allow a tripod. I have always tended to use a monopod anyway as it gives much grater flexibility.

  • Barry Milford July 15, 2011 03:44 pm

    Last time I took photos in a cathedral the curator allowed me to use a monopod so long as it was attached to my camera, but wouldn't allow a tripod. I have always tended to use a monopod anyway as it gives much grater flexibility.

  • Ianzar July 15, 2011 01:29 pm

    Haven't been to Europe (YET!!!). But here is the link to some pics at the local Cathedral where I was testing AF X MF with my new D700:

    http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.101327989964953.1290.100002632561610&l=801bca13dd

    Lens: Nikkor 50mm f/1.4. Perfect for dark places...

  • Ianzar July 15, 2011 01:21 pm

    Haven't been to Europe (YET!!!). But here is the link to some pics at the local Cathedral where I was testing AF X MF with my new D700:

    http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.101327989964953.1290.100002632561610&l=801bca13dd

    I used the only lens I've got so far, the Nikkor 50mm f/1.4. Perfect for dark places...

  • tonyjr July 15, 2011 08:50 am

    Something no one has mentioned is Monopods . In particular , cane pods .
    Silent mode , camera around neck - ISO 1600 , IS on , hobble in - find shot , back off - extend monopod and start shooting . Plan on cropping .
    I have the bogen 625 pancake QR on monopod
    http://cgi.ebay.com/Antishock-Hiking-Stick-Pole-compass-monopod-B3-/390292947133?pt=UK_SportingGoods_HikingEquipment_RL&hash=item5adf45c0bd
    I see / go to old churches in Mexico every year - Don't say I went to that one already - they rotate paintings , statues , candle stick holders for repair / maintenance / certain religious days .

  • Glenn Runyan July 15, 2011 08:11 am

    On most digital cameras, you can turn off the "shutter sound." My cameras haven't mad a sound in more than 5 years.

  • Jaap Cost Budde July 15, 2011 05:36 am

    I was in england the last three years on holiday and made an awful lot of pictures in churches and cathedrals. I always used my tripod without any problem and as I don't have an auto function on my Nikon 300s I used the P function and that gave me shots that i didn't know was possible in that low light situations.
    For the windows I found that using the flash gives me a better exposure of the coloured stained glass.
    In some of the cathedrals you need a permit but they cost you only a small amount of money.
    Since most of the flash pictures are ugly I hardly ever use flash and I stick to an ISO lower than 400 for the grainy look of higher ISO values. Noise Ninja is great but also only to a certain extent.
    The smaller churches were often also very interesting and nearly always totally without any people so I could do what I needed to do for a good shot.

  • coldwaterjohn July 15, 2011 04:55 am

    The use of flash is a serious No-No. Use the largest aperture lens you can afford, but leaving it open at f1.8 or f2 is not the answer however, as your dof will be minimal.
    ALWAYS ask permission, pointing out that you are not a commercial photographer. Offer to send them a high resolution copy of your images for instance, which they may use on their website and advertising, with your compliments.
    Several places will permit photography for a small fee - for instance Wells Cathedral permits non-commercial photography for a permit fee of £3. With that permit, a tripod can be used, provided you are sensible and don't use it in a manner which may trip people up. IF you find a tripod is banned, a Unipod, which fits on the ground in the space between your feet, so can hardly be accused of being capable of tripping anyone up, and is a viable alternative.
    The selection of mainly interior images below were all taken in religious centres of one sort of another, WITHOUT flash. Ceiling details can be obtained by lying on your back in the middle of an aisle for inmstance, or less attention can be drawn by simply lying the camera on its back in the aisle and setting its remote delay, to take the photograph, making sure passersby don't kick it, of course!
    The mosques' series did not use a tripod, but I leant against various pillars. Film speed was set between ISO 100 and ISO 400, and frequently I used triple exposures to capture the detail in shadow. Many of the shots involed 15-30 second exposures at f18 for example to ensure everything was in sharp focus.
    Wells Cathedral Interior images:
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/cwaterjohn/sets/72157626804668283/
    Inside The Sultan Qaboos Mosque:
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/cwaterjohn/sets/72157622488841218/
    Stained Glass collection:
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/cwaterjohn/sets/72157627070458847/
    inside the Shaikh Zayed Mosque:
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/cwaterjohn/sets/72157622363303799/

  • Mary Harrsch July 15, 2011 04:49 am

    To illustrate the importance of Point #6: On my first visit to Rome, my friend and I got a bit turned around looking for the Palazzo Massimo and ended up asking directions of a priest in the Church of Santa Maria degli Angeli. While there I discretely took a few images of the beautiful interior and paintings and noticed that a bright beam of sunlight was focused at a point on a mural that made it look as though a miracle was happening before our eyes. I thought it was just a coincidence but learned later that part of the interior cornice had been purposefully cut away to facilitate the effect.

    I also learned from another visitor later in the day that there are little coin boxes along the wall that will turn on additional lighting to assist visitors with their photography. I wish I had noticed them.

    In England I found churches like Westminster Abbey and St. Paul's cathedral do not allow interior photography so I was really pleased when I visited York to discover that the administrators of Yorkminster not only allow photography but flash as well, although I personally prefer subtle natural lighting anyway. [eimg link='http://www.flickr.com/photos/mharrsch/7830233/' title='Its a miracle' url='http://farm1.static.flickr.com/5/7830233_cc14982a1e_o.jpg']

  • Mary Harrsch July 15, 2011 04:46 am

    To illustrate the importance of Point #6: On my first visit to Rome, my friend and I got a bit turned around looking for the Palazzo Massimo and ended up asking directions of a priest in the Church of Santa Maria degli Angeli. While there I discretely took a few images of the beautiful interior and paintings and noticed that a bright beam of sunlight was focused at a point on a mural that made it look as though a miracle was happening before our eyes. (http://www.flickr.com/photos/mharrsch/7830233/in/set-277075/) I thought it was just a coincidence but learned later that part of the interior cornice had been purposefully cut away to facilitate the effect.

    I also learned from another visitor later in the day that there are little coin boxes along the wall that will turn on additional lighting to assist visitors with their photography. I wish I had noticed them.

    In England I found churches like Westminster Abbey and St. Paul's cathedral do not allow interior photography so I was really pleased when I visited York to discover that the administrators of Yorkminster not only allow photography but flash as well, although I personally prefer subtle natural lighting anyway.

  • Greg July 15, 2011 04:18 am

    I just came back from touring Eastern Europe and I agree with everything you said, just want to add a few things:
    - Use a bean bag to steady your shot. I made one by putting rice in a plastic sandwich bag and surronded it with denim cloth sewn together. It was great for resting on a pew, gate or against a stone wall, had very little weight and was not obtrusive to the worshipers. I was able to shoot at 4 seconds without movement.
    - Use a wide angle lens and be prepared to crop because you can't always get the best angle leaning against something for stability
    - If you use a bean bag, take three bracketed shots and create an HDR image.
    - If at all possible, out of respect, don't take photos during a service.

  • C.MASSIE July 15, 2011 03:56 am

    Photographing Cathedrals, Abbeys & Ancient Churches is one of my favourite subjects & I must agree with everything Ms Dickson says & there's been a lot of good feedback eg Flash is normally a No-No (it destroys the atmosphere in any case); tripods are normally frowned upon (try one in the UK & in most places you'll be rapidly pointed in the direction of 'OUT'). One thing I have found very useful - & they don't seem to worry the church authorities, is a Monopod. One of these does help stability & they don't take anywhere near the space needed for a tripod, nor do they need much time to set up. My wife & I both have our monopods & we wander around qhite happily & as yet haven't been questioned at all. We do take lots of care & we NEVER photograph during a service (except perhaps a wedding).

  • Martin Soler HDR Photography July 15, 2011 02:42 am

    I posted some tips of how to do interior HDRs on my blog. It's tricky due to the no tripod but check them out here:
    http://martinsoler.com/2010/06/01/church-in-the-marais/
    http://martinsoler.com/2011/04/17/in-the-halls-of-versailles-castle-hdr/

    Bonne chance :-)

  • snapageno July 13, 2011 09:37 pm

    It's occacsionnaly a good idea to take a fisheye view to get an overall impression of the interior.
    For a mix of fisheye and shift lens images all using High Dynamic Range, have a looke at
    http://snapageno.free.fr/Churches/Boschaud/index.htm

  • snapageno July 13, 2011 09:28 pm

    I take a lot of pictures of churches with a tripod and often a shift lens.
    I use HDR photography and software like Photomatix because of the extreme contrast.

    In the past I have been thrown out of a church for using a tripod. I'm not sure whether I could have asked. It sometimes looks as if each priest or sacristan has his own idea of what is acceptable, at least here in France.

  • linda@adventuresinexpatland.com July 13, 2011 04:19 pm

    As someone who currently lives in The Netherlands and enjoys spending time in old churches throughout the world, I wanted to say thanks for a useful article. You might consider referring to 'houses of worship'; on a trip earlier this year to Prague, we were swept away by the beauty of the synagogues in the Old Jewish Quarter. We even went back to attend a concert that evening in the Spanish Synagogue, and it was magical.

  • Niki Jones July 12, 2011 08:11 pm

    Also a lot of good wedding tips in there too.
    I once went in a beautiful church in Rome and realised that the event we were all gawking at was in fact a funeral. I had to leave, it seemed so disrespectful. Though I did get some sneaky ones inside the Vatican (don't tell the pope).

  • Alan July 12, 2011 08:22 am

    Iv found its not always possible to use a tripod in these places, however you can often use the seating to rest your camera on to take longer exposures. Once nobody kicks or moves the seat your sorted! :)
    Also, iv found using longer exposures means people become quite blured and ghost like, which often adds to the setting imo.

    Heres an old example of a shot I took in Kóln.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/45103502@N08/4135933885/in/set-72157624031151047

  • Henrik B July 12, 2011 05:50 am

    My best tip... NEVER FLASH. Buy a prime, like a cheap 50mm or 35mm. Don't shoot with a kit lens, the aperture won't be good enough. Pump the ISO up, and remove the noise with noiseninja. You won't need too much detail in some shots, when all it shows is architecture, so it won't be as bad as in other circumstances with an high iso. This isn't true for all shots ofc, but I think it is a decent idea.

  • THE aSTIG @ CustomPinoyRides.com July 12, 2011 02:21 am

    Excellent tips! Thanks for sharing! This will really help me in my craft.

    I do car photography for my website http://CustomPinoyRides.com

    Sometimes I use churches as backgrounds due to their magnificent architecture which can give a good contrast with the subject, depends on which type of car make ane model and the amount of customizations. But these tips will definitely help me. Thanks!

  • Maxime Gousse July 11, 2011 11:49 pm

    Coming back from a trip to Italy and France, I shot a number of beautiful churches. Being a photographic subject that I very much like, I was blessed.

    I tell this story here: http://maximegousse.wordpress.com/2011/06/10/my-second-summer-as-a-photographer-an-italian-vacation/

    I very much agree with ALL that is said here:

    The first and third and somewhat related. Just remember that churches are a place of worship. I would add that you should ensure that the church grants you permission to take pictures. Most, but not all do.

    The fourth and fifth are my favorites. My best shots are those where the light penetrates the church or when I was able to find a striking angle, especially using my Sigma 8-16.

  • R Mullen July 11, 2011 09:50 am

    Wonderful thoughts/tips, in particular 1 and 6. I gave a presentation to a group of Catholic journalist to help them improve their photo skills. Part of the presentation centered on 5 Commandments for a Catholic Photographer. While this was for a Catholic audience, the essence of it could be used within any faith. My thoughts in constructing the presentation came from 2 years of visits to Cathedrals and Shrines across North America. One of the comments in the thread was about looking beyond the grandiosity of the church to find the small treasures within the church. Another great tip and one that helps you become even more reflective.

    My presentation is here http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/rkmullen-1093045-bob-mullen-catholic-photographer-workshop-2011/ Not all of the photos are as magnificent as Christina's work, but I think our intentions line up pretty well!

  • dok July 11, 2011 12:28 am

    Hi,

    I make car photography for my website and... no just kidding.

    About the 3rd point : it really depends on the importance of the church, or more precisely, on its amount of tourists.

    You could spend the whole afternoon with your tripod in the "Basilique de St Denis" (near Paris, where most of the king of France are buried) or in the "Cathédrale de Reims" (where most of the king of France where sacred). These are two gorgeous and famous Christian buildings, but if you visit it out of a particular context (let's say a celebration of any kind, a mass for example), there won't be any problem, nobody will come at you and ask you to leave.
    I live in France, I do love churchs/cathedrals and sometimes spent some time in these buildings and NEVER felt like I was bothering anyone. Of course if you're visiting "Notre Dame de Paris" in august, it's quite different...
    But I guess that as soon as the point #1 is respected and if it's not full of tourists, it's OK to take your time with your tripod.
    This comment is at least true for France and for Christians buildings : I could not really tell about jewish or islamic buildings, since I am way more ignorant about these religions.

  • Erik Kerstenbeck July 11, 2011 12:27 am

    Hi

    Great tips! When visiting Rome, I was looked at very strangely for carrying a Tripod. Turned out that using one would consitute creating Artistic Photography. I would need to have applied for and purchased a $300 Euro Permit. I was busted by The No-Tripod Police twice!

    I would suggest to look at a Gorilla Pod from Joby. Small. discrete and does the job. If not look for something to lean against. I used a pillar for this shot inside The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Rome!

    http://kerstenbeckphotoart.wordpress.com/2010/12/22/tomb-of-the-unknown-soldier-rome/

  • Annanymous July 11, 2011 12:15 am

    I'm from Germany and enjoy photographing churches a lot. The most important tips I would give are:
    1. Ask.
    I've been given permission to use a tripod, been let into places normally off-limits, and had interesting things pointed out to me. At one time I was asked to return later to visit the Roman temple below the church (normally locked to anybody but the priest and archaeologists) and got a guided tour for me alone. All it takes is showing interest and being polite.

    2. Turn off your flash. If possible, unmount it.
    Most curators or priests don't like flashes for obvious reasons. If they notice that you don't use one (and they will notice), they'll be willing to go the extra step.

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  • William July 10, 2011 11:08 pm

    Churches are great places to photograph. I've been fortunate enough to spend several months traveling around portions of Germany. Follow the bells to find them. I think the first thing that one has to remember is try to not be just a tourist but also a photographer. In other words slow down a bit. Take time to enjoy yourself.
    I was on a tour of St. Jakobs Church in Rothenburg ob der Tauber. I was never so embarrassed in my whole life. People taking photos and talking while the tour was on going and on person was so engrossed in taking a photo of a Votive Kapella he actually knocked over several candles! Not only did he not apologize but left the candles on the floor!! The comments about being unobtrusive are bang on.
    I'm not a profi but I like having good photos of places I've visited. I try to not take snaps but if you are on a tour you sometimes don't have a lot of time to actually scout out good shots so you sort of have to take what you get. Not always but sometimes on tour that's just what you end up with.
    I like photographing churches also. You have to ask about using a Tripod in many popular tourist churches. Some like St. Jakobs will allow you to use a tripod but without flash. Not a problem really if you have a tripod.
    There are many smaller intimate churches where no one is there.
    In those churches I visited I ended up developing a technique that worked for me. Keep in mind I wasn't on a tour but just walked in. This is how I photographed those churches:
    I had a table top tripod that I attached to my P&S. I set the ISO to 100, disabled the flash, shot on P and set the self timer to 2 second delay. I took photos of the alter by placing the camera either over the back of a pew or on the small ledge in front of me. Compose your shot and take the photo. The 2 second timer acts like a cable release, and the P setting will give you the widest aperture and set the right time. Depending on the shot I will set the meter to either spot or evaluative.
    I like the tip of putting the camera on the floor to take photos of the ceiling. I carry a small compact mirror to I can see my LED screen and that helps to compose my ceiling shots using the back of the pew again.
    Nice article, good tips.

  • Shobhit July 10, 2011 10:42 pm

    Good Artice...

  • Charles Owen July 10, 2011 06:39 pm

    Thank you for this article especially the tip about respecting the environment. Some years ago I was in St. Stephens Basilica in Budapest & came across two young women posing & taking several shots in front of the high alter, laughing & talking loudly taking no regard of people who were obviously worshiping. Their lack of iinsight & respect was so unacceptable.

  • Luke July 10, 2011 09:17 am

    Great tips! I really enjoyed photographing some of the old churches when I traveled to Dresden last year. What was amazing was the fact that many of these churches had been completely rebuilt following WWII.

  • Joe Shelby July 10, 2011 09:00 am

    Depends on the church and its age (and popularity). NONE of the major historical churches we saw in Italy (except the smaller ones) allowed tripods, including St. Marks in Venice and St. Peters at the Vatican. This included 3 large churches in Florence (including the Duomo) and the main cathedral in Siena.

    For those east coat yanks that want a little practice before heading overseas, consider the National Cathedral (Episcopal) or St. Matthew's (Catholic) in DC, or St. Peters in New York. Some other regions have cathedral-like churches of significant age that are sometimes open, such as Good Shepard Episcopal in Jacksonville, FL.

  • Mandy July 10, 2011 06:59 am

    Thank you! I am actually jumping on a plane next week and heading to Rome.

  • Jenny July 10, 2011 06:46 am

    Don't forget the small details! Cathedrals especially were designed to present massive spectacular spaces, but they were also labors of love for the artisans who worked on them. After you capture the grand spaces and large windows, look for the small details in stone and glass, ironwork, tile, and so on. Some of these are in smaller nooks where you may find it easier to prop the camera on a hard surface to enable a long shutter speed.

    Another trick I've used to capture some amazing dimly lit vaulted ceilings without a tripod is to use the self timer and put the camera on the floor facing up. It can take a few shots to get the composition you want, but it's fairly unobtrusive.

  • scottc July 10, 2011 06:23 am

    Churches are one of my favorite places to photograph and I have visited dozens in Europe. All of this advice is good, particularly that regarding the use of high ISO settingss.

    I have found that many Churches allow tripods, and if you're visiting during other than service hours and the Church is not crowded with visitors then using the tripod and taking your time to compose the shot is not a problem.

    Photos from several Churches and Cathedrals we've visited in the last few years.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/lendog64/sets/72157626744612959/

  • Jessica Sweeney July 10, 2011 06:01 am

    Another tip: because the dynamic range is so great between the brightness of the windows and the darkness of the rest of the church, focus on details where the brightness is constant. Here's an example that worked out pretty well for me:

    http://quotidian-photography.blogspot.com/2010/07/for-poor-of-world.html

  • Allie July 10, 2011 05:54 am

    Great post! I make shooting in churches and other places of worship a hobby as a way to tell others about the stories and beauty behind all the historic churches out there. I'm always torn about shooting in such a way that I'm invisible. I feel less bad at more tourist-y/pilgrimage-type places, but when I go to smaller churches that aren't as well known, it's quit a challenge to not be noticed.

  • norman July 10, 2011 05:31 am

    Thanks for the tip i will try it definitely.I shot once in church during baptismal of my nephew here in Ireland and it's true it's very difficult to get a proper exposure.During my shot im using a flash at that time as i am allowed to take pictures but without a flash it is very difficult.Im just a beginner in photography.