Output from Lightroom to Your Blog - Digital Photography School

Output from Lightroom to Your Blog

Lightroom print image with border opener

I use Lightroom to prepare the images ready to upload to my blogs so it’s critical that I can get them out of Lightroom all ready to upload without having to do any more work on them. On one blog I use framed images and therein lies a problem – the images need a thin keyline around them so you can see the edge. Without an edge the image would just blend into the surrounding white background of the blog page.

So, here’s how to create a frame effect in Lightroom – the images will be sized for the web with the appropriate resolution, they will have a frame around them, together with my name, and they will have a keyline around the image and around the page itself. And, to finish, it will all be saved as a reusable template.

Start outside Lightroom in any graphics or photo-editing program and create an image 500 x 600 pixels in size and filled with white. Save it as a jpeg format image and import it into Lightroom – place it somewhere easy to find.

Lightroom print image with border 1

Then, in Lightroom place the images for the blog post into a collection and add the empty image you just created to the same collection. For convenience I use a single collection for the images destined for my blog – it makes them easier to find and it simplifies the output process.

Switch to the Print module and select the collection. To configure the document size, from the Layout Style panel select Custom Package and from the Print Job panel set Print To to read JPEG file. Set the File Resolution to 100 ppi and select the Custom File Dimensions to 5 in x 4 in to make a landscape orientation image which will ultimately be created as a 500 x 400 pixel image. Set Color Management Profile to sRGB.

Lightroom print image with border 2

Now, drag and drop the first image into the work area and size it to suit. Choose Image Settings > Inner Stroke and then set the width to 0.2 pt black line. This will appear around the image.

Lightroom print image with border 3

Now drag the empty white image into an empty place in the work area and then size it to just smaller than the size of the work area. It will automatically have a line around it – the Inner Stroke setting is applied to all the images. To place this image behind the first image, right click it and choose Send to Back.

Lightroom print image with border 4

The text is added using an Identity Plate. To make one, click the Page panel and enable the Identity Plate checkbox. Click the small triangle in the Identity Plate box and click Edit and then click Use a styled text identity plate. Type the Identity Plate text – for example, mine reads Helen Bradley | Photography – select and format it as desired. Click the Custom button, click Save As and type a name for it, click Save and then Ok to add it. Move it into position and size it to suit.

Lightroom print image with border 5

When you’re done click Print to File to print the image.

Lightroom print image with border 6

To save the design as a template you can use over and over again, click the + opposite Template Browser in the left panel. Type a name for the template.

Lightroom print image with border 7

In future you can select this template and use it to print another image. Before you do so, you will need to drag and drop an image into the image placeholder and add the empty image to the larger placeholder. If you want to be able to print portrait orientation images, repeat the process to create a second template – you can reuse the empty image and the Identity Plate.

Lightroom print image with border 8

Read more from our Post Production category.

Helen Bradley is a Lifestyle journalist who divides her time between the real and digital worlds, picking the best from both. She writes and produces video instruction for Photoshop and digital photography for magazines and online providers world wide. She has also written four books on photo crafts and blogs at Projectwoman.com.

  • http://fossphotographer.blogspot.com Skand Hurkat

    A better way would be to use CSS to add a border to the images on the website. That way, if you ever change your website/blog template some time in the future, you don’t need to update every image on that blog/website.

  • http://satesh.com/photography Satesh R

    Good tip. This works best for me since I don’t know CSS. Wish there was a way to export files as multiple formats at once… Like a hires jpeg with and without watermarks, borders, etc…

  • http://gfphotography.webs.com Gerard

    I am using Lightroom 1.3 and I don’t have a “Custom Package” option under the Layout style. Any ideas? Also, I don’t have a “Print to read JPEG” option under Print job.

  • http://www.dreamlightphotography.co.uk Steve Dunham

    Another way which works well is to use the Mogrify export/publish plug in for Lightroom. Allows framing of images and adding of logo or text.

  • http://www.france-in-photos.com Kilroy

    CSS would indeed be a more flexible method.

    Another issue is that many gallery systems (like the one I use: Zenphoto) generate thumbnails from full size images and will do so with your images with borders.
    Using CSS would avoid this and enable you to have a slightly different design (no name included at the bottom, similar border on all areas) and a hover effect on the thumbnails.

    Doing this in images and saving them in JPEG might result in having compression artifacts near the black text and border.

  • http://blog.leu.org Daniel

    I prefer to modify my image so that the copyright information is visibly embedded in the image. This is not the case when using CSS.

    As Steve mentioned, Mogrify 2 can be used for the same thing. I think an export preset is faster and easier to use. Select the target photo(s) and then choose the export preset. This is the process I use to create the images for my blog (http://blog.leu.org).

  • http://statyour.com/mashable.com Pedro

    Great blog! Is your theme custom made or did you download it from somewhere?
    A design like yours with a few simple adjustements would really make my
    blog shine. Please let me know where you got your theme. Bless you

  • http://paind1950.newsvine.com/_news/2013/01/11/16459321-dedicated-managed-server Delphia

    These are actually fantastic ideas in concerning blogging.
    You have touched some pleasant points here. Any way
    keep up wrinting.

  • Meee

    Why 100ppi?
    Normally, computers displays display graphics at 72ppi.

  • Helen Bradley

    Because the math is simple – I use 500 pixel wide images on my blog, a 5 inch image at 100ppi is 500 pixels wide – the math to configure a 72ppi image to the right number of inches that will give me an image 500 pixels wide makes my brain hurt!

Some older comments

  • Delphia

    April 19, 2013 10:00 pm

    These are actually fantastic ideas in concerning blogging.
    You have touched some pleasant points here. Any way
    keep up wrinting.

  • Pedro

    November 28, 2012 07:41 am

    Great blog! Is your theme custom made or did you download it from somewhere?
    A design like yours with a few simple adjustements would really make my
    blog shine. Please let me know where you got your theme. Bless you

  • Daniel

    November 28, 2012 06:38 am

    I prefer to modify my image so that the copyright information is visibly embedded in the image. This is not the case when using CSS.

    As Steve mentioned, Mogrify 2 can be used for the same thing. I think an export preset is faster and easier to use. Select the target photo(s) and then choose the export preset. This is the process I use to create the images for my blog (http://blog.leu.org).

  • Kilroy

    October 15, 2012 07:00 pm

    CSS would indeed be a more flexible method.

    Another issue is that many gallery systems (like the one I use: Zenphoto) generate thumbnails from full size images and will do so with your images with borders.
    Using CSS would avoid this and enable you to have a slightly different design (no name included at the bottom, similar border on all areas) and a hover effect on the thumbnails.

    Doing this in images and saving them in JPEG might result in having compression artifacts near the black text and border.

  • Steve Dunham

    October 15, 2012 07:43 am

    Another way which works well is to use the Mogrify export/publish plug in for Lightroom. Allows framing of images and adding of logo or text.

  • Gerard

    October 15, 2012 06:04 am

    I am using Lightroom 1.3 and I don't have a "Custom Package" option under the Layout style. Any ideas? Also, I don't have a "Print to read JPEG" option under Print job.

  • Satesh R

    October 14, 2012 10:46 pm

    Good tip. This works best for me since I don't know CSS. Wish there was a way to export files as multiple formats at once... Like a hires jpeg with and without watermarks, borders, etc...

  • Skand Hurkat

    October 14, 2012 03:33 am

    A better way would be to use CSS to add a border to the images on the website. That way, if you ever change your website/blog template some time in the future, you don't need to update every image on that blog/website.

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