How to Process a Landscape Photo in 5 Minutes Using Photoshop

How to Process a Landscape Photo in 5 Minutes Using Photoshop

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In this ultra fast video tutorial photographer Joshua Cripps walks your through how to process a landscape photo using Photoshop in under five minutes. He talks really fast and works quickly so if you miss anything just watch the video again (he even says that at the end) or pause it so you can follow along.

How did you make out with your own landscape image, could you do it in five minutes? If it takes you a little longer that’s just fine, especially if you’re just learning Photoshop.

Note: everything he does in the video can also be done in Lightroom using the basic sliders, adjustment brush, and graduated filter.

 


Here on dPS this is landscape week – here is list of what we’ve covered so far. Watch for a new article (or two) on landscape photography daily for the next couple days.

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Darlene Hildebrandt is the Managing Editor of dPS. She is also an educator who teaches aspiring amateurs and hobbyists how to improve their skills through articles, online photography classes, and travel tours. Get her free ebook 10 Photography Challenges to help you take better pictures or save $50 OFF on her Photo tour to Nicaragua - by using the discount code: dps50nica and join her on an adventure of a lifetime!

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  • Abe

    I much prefer the before version of the sunset. That is closer to what the eye saw and has more atmosphere.

  • Excellent job!! I enjoyed your tutorial and share with my social media.

  • Angel

    Way too much work…

  • The first bit is personal preference, which is fair enough. However I disagree that it’s likely closer to what the eye saw: our eye has far, far greater dynamic range – the ability to ‘expose’ for the bright sun while still seeing the detail in darker areas – than even the best cameras.

    Not being there one can only speculate but from what I’ve experienced with my raw images, while trying to expose for the sky and avoid clipped highlights, what the eye saw was probably somewhere between the start and the final image, perhaps around the 2:30 mark with a little more contrast.

  • sathish

    This is also more Interesting which I found in youtube….
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cnDgNef2yd8

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