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  1. #1
    jfitz is offline I'm new here!
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    Default working hard at getting this right

    WATERFALL 2

    I wish I could find the article that explained "hdrs" to me. It was simple to understand and i would have loved to pass the link on. I realise I have some distance to cover before getting it right, hence thats why I'm posting here, to get the help I need to make my pics stand up and tell the story like I'd like them to....

    Sony a200
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    18-70 mm kit lens (came with camera)

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    hey joni's Avatar
    hey joni is offline dPS Forum Member
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    Hi Jfitz, welcome.

    Are you using a programme such as photomatix to blend the hdr or are you attempting this with layers in a program like Photoshop?

    are you going for a natural or artificial look?

    the processing looks ok but I would not know it is hdr. If this is the point, then all the better.

    It is too dark around the waterfall and this should really stand out as the main feature.

    you have a number of options, one of which is dodge and burn in a layer or mask with a soft edge to brighten the exposure in that area.

    going down the hdr route through photoshop, you could layer a brighter version (maybe with levels adjusted too, to brighten the whites?) and then mask out the darker areas and blend to suit.

    If using something like photomatix, simply get the photo as properly exposed as possible and use this as your base or neutral point (i.e. exposure 0). then, using this photo, reduce the exposure by one and two stops and then brighten it by 1 and 2 stops.

    Put into the program and ensure it correctly recognises the exposure and blend to suit.

    Hope this helps.
    ---------------

    Kev

    My Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/43259995@N06/

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    jfitz is offline I'm new here!
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    Quote Originally Posted by hey joni View Post
    Hi Jfitz, welcome.

    Are you using a programme such as photomatix to blend the hdr or are you attempting this with layers in a program like Photoshop?

    are you going for a natural or artificial look?

    the processing looks ok but I would not know it is hdr. If this is the point, then all the better.

    It is too dark around the waterfall and this should really stand out as the main feature.

    you have a number of options, one of which is dodge and burn in a layer or mask with a soft edge to brighten the exposure in that area.

    going down the hdr route through photoshop, you could layer a brighter version (maybe with levels adjusted too, to brighten the whites?) and then mask out the darker areas and blend to suit.

    If using something like photomatix, simply get the photo as properly exposed as possible and use this as your base or neutral point (i.e. exposure 0). then, using this photo, reduce the exposure by one and two stops and then brighten it by 1 and 2 stops.

    Put into the program and ensure it correctly recognises the exposure and blend to suit.

    Hope this helps.
    yes in fact this is a hdr processed thru photoshop, I would like to keep it realistic looking, ty for the advice i will give it a try, i am realativly new to all this so any and all advice is welcome....whoo hoo off to photoshop to try this out TY very much

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    LeeR's Avatar
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    Here is an excellent tutorial on HDR that you may want to look at. However, I want to warn you that mastering HDR is like mastering disco dancing was a few years back; popular at the time, but a memory we would rather forget now. That's another way of saying it's a fade that is soon to die an ignoble death. You would be much, much better off spending time fixing the compositional elements of your image, which are desperate indeed, than trying your hand at the latest 'gimmick du jour.' I will tell you that I like the long exposure; you have captured the flow of the water well. But aside from that, there is nothing to lead our eye, very little contrast in values or colors and no bold graphic shapes to create emotional content. True, composition is much harder to learn than HDR, but you won't have to worry that it will be put in the morning's trash along with selective coloring and 'bokeh.'
    Lee R
    http://lucentbydesign.blogspot.com//
    The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes but in having new eyes.
    -Marcel Proust

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    jfitz is offline I'm new here!
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    Quote Originally Posted by LeeR View Post
    Here is an excellent tutorial on HDR that you may want to look at. However, I want to warn you that mastering HDR is like mastering disco dancing was a few years back; popular at the time, but a memory we would rather forget now. That's another way of saying it's a fade that is soon to die an ignoble death. You would be much, much better off spending time fixing the compositional elements of your image, which are desperate indeed, than trying your hand at the latest 'gimmick du jour.' I will tell you that I like the long exposure; you have captured the flow of the water well. But aside from that, there is nothing to lead our eye, very little contrast in values or colors and no bold graphic shapes to create emotional content. True, composition is much harder to learn than HDR, but you won't have to worry that it will be put in the morning's trash along with selective coloring and 'bokeh.'
    I will look at the link for hdr you sent and I take your comments on my composition into consideration...any help (ex. link, book,,ect) on tips for composition would also be of great help...like the title says working hard at getting this right...I enjoy the critique section of DPS becuse I can see what others are doing and the tips everyone offers

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    HDR stands for High Dynamic Range and was originally designed to help photographers in situations where the range of light far exceeds the capacity of their camera's sensor to capture it. You are trying to use the technique on a scene that is actually rather low in dynamic range. As a matter of fact, the patch of light on the water and the bush to the left tell me the sun was low enough to be largely blocked by trees or similar. If you had been there an hour earlier this may have been a very different story. The real unfortunate thing is that the detritous piled up near the edge of the falls looks like the traxh man missed your house. You may be better off focusing on a specific area of the falls rather than allowing all the distraction above.
    Lee R
    http://lucentbydesign.blogspot.com//
    The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes but in having new eyes.
    -Marcel Proust

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    Quote Originally Posted by LeeR View Post
    but you won't have to worry that it will be put in the morning's trash along with selective coloring and 'bokeh.'
    Hiya Lee, I just had a look at your Flickr photostream. I did notice that in a few of your floral photos (which are gorgeous), you've gotten some lovely bokeh!

    Heehee, I just had to tease you a little bit.

    I hear ya about selective color, though. **shudders**
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    SkyeLynn Photography is offline I'm new here!
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    Default Good Job.

    well I think your pictured turned out pretty good myself. I am new to HDR myself but I have to disagree with Lee. I do not think its going to be a fad that's going to be going anywhere. I have never used the HDR in PhotoShop but I have heard that it is not as nice as photoMatix, but like I said I have never used HDR in PhotoShop. I use PhotoMatix and love to do HDR when I get the chance. Anyway, take advice like a grain of salt. I think you did a great job, and as you know, the more you do something the better you will get at it. keep up the good work, and try to get there and hour early next time LOL LOL.

    Regards, R. Cox

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    Quote Originally Posted by SusanH1970 View Post
    Hiya Lee, I just had a look at your Flickr photostream. I did notice that in a few of your floral photos (which are gorgeous), you've gotten some lovely bokeh!

    Heehee, I just had to tease you a little bit.

    I hear ya about selective color, though. **shudders**
    Thanks for the compliment, Susan, but that's not bokeh, it's just fuzzy-out-of-focus-bits. I suppose if you tied me down and shoved bamboo shoots under my fingernails I would admit that the 'bokeh' concept has helped a lot of newbies concentrate on their backgrounds more, and that's a good thing. I just get a bit perturbed when people spend so much of their time and effort on background and miss the truly important stuff.
    Lee R
    http://lucentbydesign.blogspot.com//
    The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes but in having new eyes.
    -Marcel Proust

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    Quote Originally Posted by LeeR View Post
    Thanks for the compliment, Susan, but that's not bokeh, it's just fuzzy-out-of-focus-bits. I suppose if you tied me down and shoved bamboo shoots under my fingernails I would admit that the 'bokeh' concept has helped a lot of newbies concentrate on their backgrounds more, and that's a good thing. I just get a bit perturbed when people spend so much of their time and effort on background and miss the truly important stuff.
    Heehee....

    I as you know happen to love shooting wide open - but I concentrate on making my subjects tack sharp and clearly the object of the photo. But, I also understand that it's not right for every shot (environmental portraits, for instance). Sometimes a shot calls for f/8, but when I want to, I shoot at f/1.8.

    I'm going shopping for rope and bamboo shoots.
    Susan
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