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3D Christmas Tree - NO glasses required

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  • 3D Christmas Tree - NO glasses required

    Here's a picture of my Christmas tree with instructions on how to see it.

    What do you think?

    3D Instructions

    3D Christmas Tree
    Liltiger - Visit my Flickr page to see more http://www.flickr.com/photos/83928012@N07/

  • #2
    Liltiger,
    Very nice. It's a great image even without the 3D. I do like how the reflections of the lights on the tile floor and the picture on the wall 'pop' in 3D.

    I've found that slightly smaller photos, and adding a red dot between the images, can make merging the images simpler. If the viewer can see three images with one dot in-between each, then the center image may be easier to bring into focus and 'lock on', as you put it.

    Not to hijack your thread, but here are some examples:







    I did these in PowerPoint.

    TFS.

    Keith
    Canon Rebel XS (1000D)
    18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS EF-S
    75-300mm f/4.0-5.6 EF III
    Wolters' Plastic Models Not exactly a photography site, but it does have lots of macro pics!

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by woltersk View Post
      Liltiger,

      I've found that slightly smaller photos, and adding a red dot between the images, can make merging the images simpler. If the viewer can see three images with one dot in-between each, then the center image may be easier to bring into focus and 'lock on', as you put it.

      Not to hijack your thread, but here are some examples:

      TFS.

      Keith
      Nice shots, too, Keith, and maybe it's just my old eyes, but I found the red dot somewhat distracting and the resulting 3D effect somewhat compromised and harder to get focused. I've never seen the "red dot" method before, though, but I guess it might be better if I practiced on it. Thanks for sharing another aspect on the 3D topic.
      Alphasco: Nikon D60, Nikon D5100, 18-55mm, 55-200mm, 35mm f/1.8, 8mm and 5.6mm lenses, DuraTran 818 Tripod and three others, Manfrotto monopod and head, SB-900 and SB-R200 Wireless Remote Speedlight flashes, filters, closeup and 0.45x wide-field screw-on auxiliary lenses, PS Elements 10 and PS CS6
      flickr

      Comment


      • #4
        "maybe it's just my old eyes, but I found the red dot somewhat distracting and the resulting 3D effect somewhat compromised and harder to get focused."

        I agree with this comment - find viewing these much easier without the dot.

        Also, as far as the tree goes, this is not true 3D because, for example, the lights and other objects do not stay on the tree but appear at different depths in front of it. True 3D would bring the entire tree as a whole forward from the background.
        Last edited by BPhil8835; 01-21-2013, 02:33 PM.
        Phil Bunker
        Sites: flickr
        Gear: Pentax K110D; Pentax 18-55 f/3.5-5.6; Pentax 50-200 f/4-5.6; Pentax 55mm f/1.8; Tamron Macro 90mm f/2.8; Manfrotto tripod and ball head; Adobe Photoshop Elements 10

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by woltersk View Post
          Liltiger,
          Very nice. It's a great image even without the 3D. I do like how the reflections of the lights on the tile floor and the picture on the wall 'pop' in 3D.

          I've found that slightly smaller photos, and adding a red dot between the images, can make merging the images simpler. If the viewer can see three images with one dot in-between each, then the center image may be easier to bring into focus and 'lock on', as you put it.

          TFS.

          Keith
          Keith,

          I somewhat agree with the other two people as the dot seems a bit distracting for me. It may be a solution for those who have trouble, but I don't feel that I will be using it.

          But, thanks for the suggestion.

          Originally posted by BPhil8835 View Post
          "maybe it's just my old eyes, but I found the red dot somewhat distracting and the resulting 3D effect somewhat compromised and harder to get focused."

          I agree with this comment - find viewing these much easier without the dot.

          Also, as far as the tree goes, this is not true 3D because, for example, the lights and other objects do not stay on the tree but appear at different depths in front of it. True 3D would bring the entire tree as a whole forward from the background.
          BPhil8835,

          Although I do appreciate any and all comments and critiques, I'm not sure I agree. When done correctly, the tree DOES come forward from the background. I don't know if maybe you're confused by the surrounding furniture on either side of the tree that is actually in front of the tree, but, to me, the lights look like they're exactly where they should be.

          At least, that's what I see... exactly what I looked at when I stood in front of it.

          But, thanks for the comment.
          Liltiger - Visit my Flickr page to see more http://www.flickr.com/photos/83928012@N07/

          Comment


          • #6
            Crossview vs. Divergent

            The Christmas tree picture (nice picture!) is in crossview; the following examples are divergent - quite a difference in how you view them! As noted, divergent viewing is the same method used to view the 1990's "Magic Eye" photos. I learned to do this, but found it a bit of an effort, whereas the crossview method seems like duck soup to me, and also as noted, lends itself much more easily to viewing larger and different shape images.






            Originally posted by woltersk View Post
            Liltiger,


            Very nice. It's a great image even without the 3D. I do like how the reflections of the lights on the tile floor and the picture on the wall 'pop' in 3D.

            I've found that slightly smaller photos, and adding a red dot between the images, can make merging the images simpler. If the viewer can see three images with one dot in-between each, then the center image may be easier to bring into focus and 'lock on', as you put it.

            Not to hijack your thread, but here are some examples:







            I did these in PowerPoint.

            TFS.

            Keith

            Comment

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