Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

How I shoot the moon..

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    Thanks again for your tips. Been meaning to do this sooner but it's been rainy and overcast until tonight.







    Nikon D90 w/70-300mm VR Nikkor Lens (VR off, manual focus)
    Exposure: 0.005 sec (1/200)
    Aperture: f/11.0
    Focal Length: 300 mm
    ISO Speed: 200
    Exposure Bias: 0 EV

    Comment


    • #32
      Looks like it came out pretty well!
      My Pbase Galleries

      My Deviant Gallery

      Comment


      • #33
        I absolutely love your moon shots!!! I want to give it a try ... what do you think I can do with my Nikon D90 and my new 200-400 Nikkor tele? Should I try a close-up filter (I have a set), or try buying a teleconverter?

        Comment


        • #34
          Beautiful moon pix! I have two questions and am really looking forward to your response (and help!).

          I am a serious pleasure photographer who would like to migrate my work toward art in the very near future. I just recently received my new camera (5D Mark II) and also bought a tripod (Manfrotto 055XPROB) and ball head (Manfrotto 488RC2) and set up last night to experience moon photography but I ran into a couple of troubles, one with the tripod/ball head and the other with my exposure. I am wondering if you could advise me what I am doing wrong.

          I used my Canon EF 300 mm 1:4 L IS lens for a few shots and then added a 2X II extender (also by Canon), which puts considerable weight on the ball head and tripod. that is why I bought this tripod and ball head... it is supposed to be able to support up to 11 lbs but I could only fix the camera focus centering the moon if I originally aimed way up over the moon and after I tightend, the camera naturally sagged down to the center of the moon... naturally none of the shots turned out sharp as a result. What is your suggestion on this one?

          And in terms of my shooting... all were way over exposed.. I don't have a light meter so I am relying on Canon's sensors but I probably have something set wrong and it is averaging the dark background with the light moon. How do I get the camera sensors to just meter the brightness of the moon? is that possible at all?

          Thanks for your help!!!
          Angela

          Comment


          • #35




            These are my pics of the moon taken in April. There were taken on the same day just hrs apart. I took some since them but they are still on the card in my camera.

            Comment


            • #36
              Wow! These photos are great! I would love to take photos of the moon. I only have one lens: a 18-55 mm. I need to look into getting a longer lens. Thanks for sharing :-)

              Comment


              • #37
                I tried shooting the moon with my Canon SX100 IS but I was unable to get a good close image of the moon. I think the camera has focal length of 36-360mm. Isn't that enough to get close shots?
                ShutterTux | Flickr

                "I gaze at the sunset with the woman I love & think f/8.0 at 1/250"

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by astanton View Post
                  Beautiful moon pix! I have two questions and am really looking forward to your response (and help!).

                  And in terms of my shooting... all were way over exposed.. I don't have a light meter so I am relying on Canon's sensors but I probably have something set wrong and it is averaging the dark background with the light moon. How do I get the camera sensors to just meter the brightness of the moon? is that possible at all?

                  Thanks for your help!!!
                  Angela
                  shoot MANUAL mode only. Any auto function (using the camera's meter) is a total waste of time. This is a MANUAL MODE only deal.

                  For 300mm you really need a lens with a tripod mounting collar on the lens. You'll always have trouble with the tripod. You may actually be better off hand holding than using a inadequate tripod support. Problem comes from the vibrations transmitted buy the shutter release. Also use the self timer to release the shutter..
                  My Pbase Galleries

                  My Deviant Gallery

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by Hoffy50 View Post
                    I absolutely love your moon shots!!! I want to give it a try ... what do you think I can do with my Nikon D90 and my new 200-400 Nikkor tele? Should I try a close-up filter (I have a set), or try buying a teleconverter?
                    Forget the close up filters. The moon is more than a few feet away from the camera.

                    400mm will get you some nice shots if you have a decent tripod to support it.
                    My Pbase Galleries

                    My Deviant Gallery

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Full moon

                      If you remember shooting the "full moon' is almost shooting into the sun...F11 .25O shutter speed...handheld works but a tripod is best...then play around from there. Well this is what has worked for me...Have fun!!!

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Originally posted by astanton View Post

                        And in terms of my shooting... all were way over exposed.. I don't have a light meter so I am relying on Canon's sensors but I probably have something set wrong and it is averaging the dark background with the light moon. How do I get the camera sensors to just meter the brightness of the moon? is that possible at all?
                        Hi Angela,
                        Most camera's have three metering modes: Introduction to Metering Modes

                        There are three primary Metering Modes:
                        1. Evaluative or Matrix
                        2. Partial or Spot
                        3. Center-Weighted Average

                        When you shoot a white scene like snow with Matrix metering the camera will meter the scene to 18% gray.

                        This works because of the following: Your camera's light metering system is calibrated to the brightness of average gray ("18% gray"). That means that in evaluative metering mode, the camera will determine the exposure so that the average brightness of the whole image is 18% gray. Snow is brighter than 18% gray, so if you let the camera decide without exposure compensation, it will tend to make the snow too dark (gray) instead of white. By setting exposure compensation to +1/2 or +1, you deliberately overexpose a little bit, so that the snow becomes white.

                        While shooting the moon you could be using a spot meter on the moon which would be just like shooting scene of snow. If you are shooting in Matrix mode and the moon is a large portion of the scene you may still trick the meter into under exposing. If the moon is smaller then the metering system is seeing mainly black and will cause the camera to over expose. I know this sounds backwards, but remember the metering is trying to get the image to 18% gray. Dark Scenes will get lighter and White Scenes will get darker. You will need to adjust your exposure compensation or in manual mode you could play with shutter or aperture controls.

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Originally posted by astanton View Post
                          Beautiful moon pix! I have two questions and am really looking forward to your response (and help!).

                          I am a serious pleasure photographer who would like to migrate my work toward art in the very near future. I just recently received my new camera (5D Mark II) and also bought a tripod (Manfrotto 055XPROB) and ball head (Manfrotto 488RC2) and set up last night to experience moon photography but I ran into a couple of troubles, one with the tripod/ball head and the other with my exposure. I am wondering if you could advise me what I am doing wrong.

                          I used my Canon EF 300 mm 1:4 L IS lens for a few shots and then added a 2X II extender (also by Canon), which puts considerable weight on the ball head and tripod. that is why I bought this tripod and ball head... it is supposed to be able to support up to 11 lbs but I could only fix the camera focus centering the moon if I originally aimed way up over the moon and after I tightend, the camera naturally sagged down to the center of the moon... naturally none of the shots turned out sharp as a result. What is your suggestion on this one?

                          And in terms of my shooting... all were way over exposed.. I don't have a light meter so I am relying on Canon's sensors but I probably have something set wrong and it is averaging the dark background with the light moon. How do I get the camera sensors to just meter the brightness of the moon? is that possible at all?

                          Thanks for your help!!!
                          Angela
                          Hi Angela,

                          It's best to try and have the camera+lens centre of gravity over the centre of the tripod. Are you using a collar fitted to the lens attached to the tripod? This limits the amount of off-center loading seen by the ball-head. As a workaround, you could try fixing your camera in "a" position on the ball head, and make minor adjustments by altering tripod leg lengths. This has worked for me in the past, but you do need a second person to support your setup just in case...
                          When people ask what equipment I use - I tell them my eyes. - Anonymous

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            My first attempt

                            Ok, this is my first post on this forum and my first attempt at moon photography. It's just like me to try this for the first time on the night of a full moon. The pictures turned out ok. I want to try again when the moon is 1/2 to 3/4 to see if I can get better craters. But, here's my picture:

                            DSC_0085

                            It was taken with a Nikon D50, at 220mm, f18, 1/320. I followed the instructions and increased contrast and sharpened in post processing. I shot in raw and converted to .jpg. I thought I had the ISO set at 200 but I think its an automatic setting and the finished picture says the ISO was 1600. I'm sure this makes a difference. If someone has any suggestions how to change this setting and if it would help, let me know. Thanks for taking a look and be gentle. lol

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Wow! just WOW Oo
                              Wishlist...Kettlebell ,vibration plate

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Very cool! Love the one of the church!
                                -Rachel
                                “Sometimes I do get to places just when God’s ready to have somebody click the shutter.” – Ansel Adams

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X