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  • Photography Certificate

    Hello everyone

    I was considering getting a photography certificate and start earning some money by becoming a photographer. I was wondering is this a good way to start? If not I am open to suggestions.
    Jones

  • #2
    Learning to take photos is always a good place to start. I'm not a believer in certificates, I'm a believer in actual hard proof : photos that tell stories, photos that invoke emotion... Not a piece of paper with a "this person is a photographer" badge on it.

    That said, I think there should be some kind of "proficiency certificate" for people that want to call themselves professionals, if they're going to take peoples money and provide a service - same as with everything.

    sorry - you caught me on the wrong side of a discussion about micro$oft examinations and certification.

    dPS is a great place to learn! - No certificate required.

    Sime
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    • #3
      I'll bite... what is a photography certificate? Where do you get them from, and what purpose do they serve?
      David Clark Photography, project 365 photo blog, flickr.
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      • #4
        It is at at technical college in SC.
        Whether your desire is to improve your knowledge of all aspects of photography or to prepare for a career in the field, you will enjoy this fun, practical, informative and very comprehensive program leading to a Certificate in Photography. This class covers basic camera techniques including exposure, depth of field, composition and how film and digital cameras work. After learning the basics, students are introduced to more advanced classes: flash photography, light and filtration, portrait lighting using studio photofloods, wedding photography and marketing your own photographs. The program concludes with a 9 hour hands-on digital photography lab where you will be introduced to picture editing using the software tools in Adobe Photoshop Elements.


        Certificate students will complete this intense 44-hour course within seven weeks. Certificates will be awarded to students who attend all courses and complete all required projects and assignments. Photography Certificate Program is $649 inclusive.


        What do you all suggest I do to get started?
        Jones

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        • #5
          Certificate students will complete this intense 44-hour course within seven weeks. Certificates will be awarded to students who attend all courses and complete all required projects and assignments. Photography Certificate Program is $649 inclusive.

          What do you all suggest I do to get started?
          I suggest you start by reading this thread: http://digital-photography-school.co...ad.php?t=41677


          Man's that a good deal. Maybe I should find a program where I can get a certificate in Brain Salad Surgery
          http://pa.photoshelter.com/c/jimbryant
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          (1) EOS 1D MKIII (3) EOS 1D's, (3) EOS1D MKIIs', (1) EOS1Ds MKII, 14mmf2.8, 16-35mmf2.8, 28-70mmf2.8, 70-200mm f2.8, 300mm f2.8 and a 400mmf2.8, (4) 550 EX and 1 580E speedlite, and a Speed a tron studio flash system.

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          • #6
            There are a lot of potential customers who would probably put a lot of stock into the fact that you have that certificate or not..... probably not other photographers though

            You would be surprised what people will believe if its framed with some fancy signatures on it.

            I am not a pro, but I would think a strong portfolio will be your biggest asset, and a certificate like that is just reinforcement for people who like to think you were "trained" in your profession.
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            • #7
              Originally posted by jprime84 View Post
              There are a lot of potential customers who would probably put a lot of stock into the fact that you have that certificate or not..... probably not other photographers though

              You would be surprised what people will believe if its framed with some fancy signatures on it.

              I am not a pro, but I would think a strong portfolio will be your biggest asset, and a certificate like that is just reinforcement for people who like to think you were "trained" in your profession.
              True. Photographs are stronger than words. And you're only good as your last photograph taken.
              http://pa.photoshelter.com/c/jimbryant
              http://jimbryantphotography.blogspot.com/
              (1) EOS 1D MKIII (3) EOS 1D's, (3) EOS1D MKIIs', (1) EOS1Ds MKII, 14mmf2.8, 16-35mmf2.8, 28-70mmf2.8, 70-200mm f2.8, 300mm f2.8 and a 400mmf2.8, (4) 550 EX and 1 580E speedlite, and a Speed a tron studio flash system.

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              • #8
                So what do you think I should do to get started? I need some advice.........help lol
                Jones

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                • #9
                  Well, I think as creative of a market as photography is there is room for people to earn even if they are not accomplished photographers.
                  Much like the music business, I have heard MANY awful musicians that make a lot of money making music because they have an audience that supports their "art"
                  Same hold true for photography. I have seen many images from famous photographers that in my humble opinion are simply trash and have a value strictly because so and so took the image. On the other hand I have seen MANY images from people who claim they are newbies here and else where that are awesome.
                  I think that any education that increases ones knowledge of photography is good even if it is a certificate course. Whether or not you can turn that certificate into a profession is up to the individual and his/her artistic and business sense.
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                  • #10
                    I think that the certificate course is a good idea to help you learn how to take a better photograph, but I don't think that it is a $649.00 guarantee to a career in photography. I think a good portfolio helps a whole lot. Thats just my opinion.
                    Mark

                    M.C.Adams
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                    • #11
                      Learn at a lot would be my suggestion , I am new to photography but would love to be able to make money from photos I take , having run my own business I understand the commitment this takes and I would feel it necessary to have a huge knowledge base before calling myself a professional , what would be more embarrassing than having somebody who hired you to take photographs knowing more than you did , confidence comes from knowledge in yr chosen field and provides a base for you to build on , and in photography having some artistic feel and a great eye certainly go a long way to the art you create I dont believe this can be taught .Good luck and all the best .
                      http://www.flickr.com/photos/bradzo66/
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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by slimgoodie_5 View Post
                        It is at at technical college in SC.
                        ...
                        Certificate students will complete this intense 44-hour course within seven weeks. Certificates will be awarded to students who attend all courses and complete all required projects and assignments. Photography Certificate Program is $649 inclusive.

                        What do you all suggest I do to get started?
                        That depends on why you're considering the certificate program.

                        Pros:
                        -You're the type of individuals that feel more comfortable with an instructional program.
                        -You can learn a lot in a short period of time formally
                        -You know something about the local instructor (I'll goto Freeman Patterson course/seminar anytime if I live in Nova Scotia, Canada.)
                        http://www.freemanpatterson.com

                        Like many others, you can learn the science and art of photography by yourself. Get help from the internet-based resources and forums such as DPS--plus a lot of practices.

                        When you think you're ready, check out some business-oriented specialized seminar(s). Take a look at the following links (as an example).

                        http://www.annabelwilliams.com/courses.php
                        http://www.barrettandcoe.co.uk/

                        You may find that in some photo-related businesses, you need good contacts, referrals and marketing to be successful.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by m.c.adams View Post
                          I think that the certificate course is a good idea to help you learn how to take a better photograph, but I don't think that it is a $649.00 guarantee to a career in photography. I think a good portfolio helps a whole lot. Thats just my opinion.
                          Mark
                          I agree with this! Classes certainly help, but are no guarantee. Take the class, but also check books out from the library, do research, check out this forum and others - and most importantly get out there and start taking photos! Build your portfolio!!
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                          • #14
                            We're always learning (god, at least I hope we are!) so even people who've been shooting for years are still honing, still learning.

                            When I got my first SLR in years and years, it was film--no DSLRs yet---and every chance I got, I was out taking a roll of film. I wrote down what I did, what settings, etc. and then compared when I got my film back what looked good and what didn't. MOST of what I got was crap. LOL.

                            I took the New York School of Photography course and paid about what you're thinking of paying. I never finished it but what I learned from it was really beneficial. I might start it again.

                            I think going out and taking shot after shot after shot--but doing it in a conscious way--is something that will serve you well in addition to whatever you might choose to do. I think if you want to spend the money, then do so. Just be realistic in your expectations that this alone won't make you a professional photographer. It's a "layer" in your experience. As is a good portfolio.

                            Good luck and share your work with us as you go along!

                            Debra
                            Debra
                            Lovin' my new Nikon D300!

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                            • #15
                              In my humble opinion I wouldn't expect very much from a class like that. They cover a ton of topics in a limited amount of time. The class is pretty cheap as well. My guess is the class would be set at a pretty quick pace where they throw a lot of the basics at you and let you go on your way.

                              There is a LOT to learn about photography and you certainly will need to learn a LOT more after this class. If you are serious about becoming a professional I would enroll in a local community college and go through a structured learning course that focuses on a limited aspect of photography at a time. Sometimes these community colleges also offer work study programs to get your foot in the door.

                              If you are just looking to take a class to get your feet wet your money would probably be better spent on a few good books. There have been previous threads with links to excellent reading sources. You will save your money and time if you have the will to actually want to learn.

                              I enrolled at a local community college here, unfortunately I have to take a lot of beginner classes before I can take the more advanced classes. Right now I am taking a Film 101 class, I have yet to learn a single thing and expected that from the class. I do however enjoy the class and the money I spent on it makes me feel accountable for going out and taking pictures. I went through a dry spell of a year because of the lose of a car and lack of transportation to go out shooting. I now have a car again and really have gotten back into the swing of things. I didn't expect to learn anything from the class and I probably won't learn anything in the next class I am required to take (Digital Imaging I). This is expected however since I have been self teaching myself the past few years and I am fine with that.

                              If I had little to no experience I would learn a lot going through the focused steps the college has you take. They have awesome equipment digital backs for large format cameras, tons of expensive lighting equipment, lens, body and flash rental, and experienced instructors. These are the reasons why I went I want to be able to pick someones brain if needed, and use the really nice equipment they have to build a portfolio for myself and meet like minded people.

                              You get what you pay for and you make the best out of the resources that are given too you.
                              Last edited by Murtasma; 03-19-2009, 01:57 PM.
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