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  • catch a bullet

    Try to capture a bullet on camera. The average speed of a 9mm round leaving a pistol is about 1100 feet per second. So calculate how fast your shutter speed will have to be to freeze this bullet. Also You might have to work with different angles. I am gonna try this when I get home, but I want to see what you all come up with.

    Good Luck
    please add me on facebook even if you don't like my photos. much appreciated!
    Colby Jack Photography on facebook

    :: Canon EOS 1V :: Canon EOS 3 :: 50mm f/1.8 :: 35-80mm f/4-5.6 ::80-200mm f/4.5-5.6 ::

  • #2
    Thank you for this reminder. I've wanted to go to the range with a friend of mine and try catching some muzzle blasts. With any luck, I'll get a two-for-one deal and catch a bullet leaving the gun as well.
    My flickr

    Nikon D5000 / Nikon 35mm f/1.8 AF-S lens / Nissin DI-866ii flash

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    • #3
      Well, ive done the math. Most cameras max out at 1/8000 shutter speed. at the rate of 1100 fps the bullet will travel 1.65 inches during that 1/8000 of a second, so yes this is challenging. I'm sure there is a way to catch it at the right angle. I can't try it now since I am in Iraq but when i get to a range back in Alaska I will be trying this out
      please add me on facebook even if you don't like my photos. much appreciated!
      Colby Jack Photography on facebook

      :: Canon EOS 1V :: Canon EOS 3 :: 50mm f/1.8 :: 35-80mm f/4-5.6 ::80-200mm f/4.5-5.6 ::

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      • #4
        Originally posted by 3bayjunkie View Post
        Well, ive done the math. Most cameras max out at 1/8000 shutter speed. at the rate of 1100 fps the bullet will travel 1.65 inches during that 1/8000 of a second, so yes this is challenging. I'm sure there is a way to catch it at the right angle. I can't try it now since I am in Iraq but when i get to a range back in Alaska I will be trying this out
        run your shutter speed at your flash sync speed and your aperture set so you get darkness without a flash. run the flash at its lowest setting which will make the exposure much shorter than a mechanical shutter could ever achieve. this is used in any high speed setup because its not possible to mechanically get an exposure that short
        Sony Alpha α450, α330
        Lightroom 3, Adobe CS5, iMac 21.5"

        I Shoot RAW

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        • #5
          yeah i did think about doing that. probably going to be the only way to catch it
          please add me on facebook even if you don't like my photos. much appreciated!
          Colby Jack Photography on facebook

          :: Canon EOS 1V :: Canon EOS 3 :: 50mm f/1.8 :: 35-80mm f/4-5.6 ::80-200mm f/4.5-5.6 ::

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          • #6
            Originally posted by 3bayjunkie View Post
            Well, ive done the math. Most cameras max out at 1/8000 shutter speed. at the rate of 1100 fps the bullet will travel 1.65 inches during that 1/8000 of a second, so yes this is challenging. I'm sure there is a way to catch it at the right angle. I can't try it now since I am in Iraq but when i get to a range back in Alaska I will be trying this out
            Try mounting the camera directly in front; it should stay in view that way.
            Nikon D80 / 18-55mm VR f/3.5-5.6 / 55-200mm f/4-5.6 / 50mm f/1.8 / SB-400
            Flickr Photostream / Photosynth Panoramas / 500px Portfolio

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            • #7
              Not sure if this counts -- it's a shotgun, so there's no bullet, per se, but I'd say it's pretty close.
              David Lambert
              lambertpix.com
              More photos on Flickr and 500px

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              • #8
                Originally posted by dlambert View Post
                Not sure if this counts -- it's a shotgun, so there's no bullet, per se, but I'd say it's pretty close.
                I think that could count what was the shutterspeed anyway?
                please add me on facebook even if you don't like my photos. much appreciated!
                Colby Jack Photography on facebook

                :: Canon EOS 1V :: Canon EOS 3 :: 50mm f/1.8 :: 35-80mm f/4-5.6 ::80-200mm f/4.5-5.6 ::

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by kcoppock View Post
                  Try mounting the camera directly in front; it should stay in view that way.
                  i was thinking infront just off to the side enough so that it doesn't get hit by the bullet
                  please add me on facebook even if you don't like my photos. much appreciated!
                  Colby Jack Photography on facebook

                  :: Canon EOS 1V :: Canon EOS 3 :: 50mm f/1.8 :: 35-80mm f/4-5.6 ::80-200mm f/4.5-5.6 ::

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by 3bayjunkie View Post
                    i was thinking infront just off to the side enough so that it doesn't get hit by the bullet
                    That could work. I was just being a smart-ass. :P

                    I'm pretty interested to see the results of this, though. I don't own a gun, so no tries from me.
                    Nikon D80 / 18-55mm VR f/3.5-5.6 / 55-200mm f/4-5.6 / 50mm f/1.8 / SB-400
                    Flickr Photostream / Photosynth Panoramas / 500px Portfolio

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by 3bayjunkie View Post
                      I think that could count what was the shutterspeed anyway?
                      1/1000, 50mm f/1.8, ISO 200.

                      This was a "shooting campout" for my son's Scout Troop. The kids were shooting .22's all day, and I got all sorts of shells ejecting, but no bullets. Same thing for adults shooting handguns - the shell ejections look pretty nice, though. This ended up being the only bullet-like capture I got all day.

                      Here's one of the shell ejections:



                      You can see more shots from the weekend here.
                      David Lambert
                      lambertpix.com
                      More photos on Flickr and 500px

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by 3bayjunkie View Post
                        Try to capture a bullet on camera. The average speed of a 9mm round leaving a pistol is about 1100 feet per second. So calculate how fast your shutter speed will have to be to freeze this bullet. Also You might have to work with different angles. I am gonna try this when I get home, but I want to see what you all come up with.

                        Good Luck
                        Great Idea. I have some 44magnum rounds. They are travelling at 900 foot per second. They where the 1st I loaded with 300gr bullets when I was working a load up for hunting. Timing is of the essence, dont have any thing to trip the camera and only have about 10 of those slow rounds. When you getting back 3bayjunkie
                        flickrgear:Nikon D3000

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by bobajob View Post
                          Great Idea. I have some 44magnum rounds. They are travelling at 900 foot per second. They where the 1st I loaded with 300gr bullets when I was working a load up for hunting. Timing is of the essence, dont have any thing to trip the camera and only have about 10 of those slow rounds. When you getting back 3bayjunkie
                          6 or 7 months...
                          please add me on facebook even if you don't like my photos. much appreciated!
                          Colby Jack Photography on facebook

                          :: Canon EOS 1V :: Canon EOS 3 :: 50mm f/1.8 :: 35-80mm f/4-5.6 ::80-200mm f/4.5-5.6 ::

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                          • #14
                            I've managed mortar rounds, never tried with a bullet.

                            Only time I can recall seeing one in flight with the Mk 2 Eyeball is when we were shooting .22 Bee rounds in the Poconos.

                            Nikon D5000
                            Photobucket

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                            • #15
                              aahh!!! i F'kin hate mortors!!!! arggg!!!
                              please add me on facebook even if you don't like my photos. much appreciated!
                              Colby Jack Photography on facebook

                              :: Canon EOS 1V :: Canon EOS 3 :: 50mm f/1.8 :: 35-80mm f/4-5.6 ::80-200mm f/4.5-5.6 ::

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