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Wedding Photography

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  • Wedding Photography

    If a amateur photographer wanted to attempt a low key wedding what are some things needed? What are some ideas on how to get the most out of the pictures? any other hints tips or tricks?

  • #2
    Depends on the type of gear you are using and if you can or cannot use flash during the ceremony. If no flash is allowed, you might want to go out and rent some fast lenses.
    http://pa.photoshelter.com/c/jimbryant
    http://jimbryantphotography.blogspot.com/
    (1) EOS 1D MKIII (3) EOS 1D's, (3) EOS1D MKIIs', (1) EOS1Ds MKII, 14mmf2.8, 16-35mmf2.8, 28-70mmf2.8, 70-200mm f2.8, 300mm f2.8 and a 400mmf2.8, (4) 550 EX and 1 580E speedlite, and a Speed a tron studio flash system.

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    • #3
      f2.8 and be there. (sorry... couldn't resist)

      Seriously, you'll need a camera and a good eye. If you want your pictures to be something that the bride and groom will treasure forever... you might have to work a little harder.

      Although I shouldn't admit it,... the very first wedding that I shot with a digital camera was done with just a kit lens. If you want your pictures to look good, consider a good TTL flash, and a lens that will open up to at least 2.8 for low light. If your camera handles high ISO, that's just gravy.

      Study the pictures on other wedding photographer websites. Look at the types of pictures, the angles, and the emotion in the pictures. Google Sal Cincotta and look at his work. Or if you want to see a slideshow of pure wedding ART... check out Inku at this link

      Google Tony Hoffer. Every time I see his work, I smack myself because I suck in comparison. Learn from the masters.

      The best "tip" I ever got was to watch for the emotion. Focus on the mother of the bride as the bride is walking down the isle. Focus on the eyes as the bride and groom share their first dance. watch for the emotion. f2.8 and be there. Done.
      Rich Spears www.rspearsphotography.com
      Blog | Flickr | Zenfolio
      Nikon D3s, D700, Nikon 24-70mm f/2.8, 70-200mm f/2.8, 50mm f/1.8, 85mm 1.8

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      • #4
        Tell us what equipment you have my little chicken noodle
        Art: www.jamieorourke.co.uk
        Work: www.jamieorourkephotography.co.uk
        Sony a200 Sony a580, Canon 500D, Canon 550D, Canon 600D, Canon 600D

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        • #5
          "low light" is the real constraint. I think to pull it off you need a body with very good to excellent high iso performance, fast lenes and good post processing noise reduction software. (and of course the ability to effectively use all 3)
          "They call me Bruce."
          www.brucebphotography.com

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          • #6
            Originally posted by zona5101 View Post
            "low light" is the real constraint. I think to pull it off you need a body with very good to excellent high iso performance, fast lenes and good post processing noise reduction software. (and of course the ability to effectively use all 3)
            Yep this is it in a nutshell. I've been shooting with a 7d but am going to upgrade to a 5D MK III in a few weeks I think as even the 7d struggles with some of the locations I have to shoot weddings in...

            I shoot with a 7d and a f/2.8 lens and even then sometimes there's a fair bit of noise reduction to be carried out.
            Newcastle Photography
            Newcastle Wedding Photography

            Follow me on twitter

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            • #7
              You know what sucks?

              Wedding photography.
              moreinmind.com - photo & design

              Twitter - @KevanMorin

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              • #8
                Originally posted by moreinmind View Post
                You know what sucks?

                Wedding photography.
                Yep.. almost not worth it is it? To the OP definitely the most challenging thing you will ever do you better have allot of experience under your belt.

                I revert to a famous thread here. It will put it in prospective..

                http://digital-photography-school.co...g-shooter.html
                Cameras: Canon 60D, Canon 20D, 35mm Nikon FM2n
                Canon EF lens used : 50mm f1.8, 18-55mm f/3.5-5.5, 75-300mm f/4.5-5, 85mm f/1.8
                Tamron Lens: 28-75mm F/2.8 XR Di LD Aspherical (IF)
                Strobist: Canon 580EX II , "Vivitar DF400MZ, Nikon SB-24, LP-160, YN568EX"
                http://flickr.com/photos/bhursey | http://brianhurseyphotography.com

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                • #9
                  Hey Polarismagic, frankly speaking the main thing you require is the talent and interest to capture the good moments. Apart from that a good proficient lens is needed. Other things you can learn with time and experience. Try to examine the photographs of some other professionals. You will get some good ideas from that also. Best of luck.

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                  • #10
                    A backup camera.
                    Art: www.jamieorourke.co.uk
                    Work: www.jamieorourkephotography.co.uk
                    Sony a200 Sony a580, Canon 500D, Canon 550D, Canon 600D, Canon 600D

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Biomech View Post
                      A backup camera.
                      Thumbs up! Yah you really need a backup of everything truthfully.
                      Cameras: Canon 60D, Canon 20D, 35mm Nikon FM2n
                      Canon EF lens used : 50mm f1.8, 18-55mm f/3.5-5.5, 75-300mm f/4.5-5, 85mm f/1.8
                      Tamron Lens: 28-75mm F/2.8 XR Di LD Aspherical (IF)
                      Strobist: Canon 580EX II , "Vivitar DF400MZ, Nikon SB-24, LP-160, YN568EX"
                      http://flickr.com/photos/bhursey | http://brianhurseyphotography.com

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        You'll need the ability to change everything on your camera for something that is unfolding in front of you, and you'll only have a few seconds to adapt everything... wait... you missed it... the moment is gone.

                        With most photography.... we can take our time getting the settings correct... and we can make "test shots" to make sure the lighting is correct, and if it didn't work, we can re-take the shot.

                        With wedding photography, everything happens fast. The light changes, the shooting background changes, people with different skin tones move in an out frame. You have to move and shoot fast. You have to know your camera controls by touch. You can't even take time to chimp. Just when you think you're doing good, your battery will die or memory card will become full just as the bride and groom start their first dance. Pack some Pepto Bismol in your camera case... you'll need it.
                        Rich Spears www.rspearsphotography.com
                        Blog | Flickr | Zenfolio
                        Nikon D3s, D700, Nikon 24-70mm f/2.8, 70-200mm f/2.8, 50mm f/1.8, 85mm 1.8

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Wow-- you guys have gotten nicer in the last few months since I've been on here last! As soon as I saw this post, I was preparing for answers like, "5+ years experience", "knowledge", "talent" etc.

                          I am happy to see that there were a lot of helpful responses! Very refreshing!

                          My suggestion for the OP is an extra battery and extra cards with a lot of space! Like others have said, everything happens fast and there are no do-overs. It all only happens once! Good Luck!
                          www.metric-photography.com

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by metric_photography View Post
                            Wow-- you guys have gotten nicer in the last few months since I've been on here last! As soon as I saw this post, I was preparing for answers like, "5+ years experience", "knowledge", "talent" etc.

                            I am happy to see that there were a lot of helpful responses! Very refreshing!

                            My suggestion for the OP is an extra battery and extra cards with a lot of space! Like others have said, everything happens fast and there are no do-overs. It all only happens once! Good Luck!
                            That's only because I added my 2 cents worth of advice!
                            http://pa.photoshelter.com/c/jimbryant
                            http://jimbryantphotography.blogspot.com/
                            (1) EOS 1D MKIII (3) EOS 1D's, (3) EOS1D MKIIs', (1) EOS1Ds MKII, 14mmf2.8, 16-35mmf2.8, 28-70mmf2.8, 70-200mm f2.8, 300mm f2.8 and a 400mmf2.8, (4) 550 EX and 1 580E speedlite, and a Speed a tron studio flash system.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Hello I live in Austria and have been asked to be the second camera at a wedding, I have a Canon 7d, what lens would you recommend, the main photographer als has a 7d and uses a 24-70mm Canon l series.
                              Thanks for any help, by the way I used to live in Ryton, JIM Email jmsmulholland@gmail.com

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