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Light #8 - Weather

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  • Light #8 - Weather

    Light 8a.

    Weather - Fog & misty rain

    The weather will have a major impact on the appearance of your photographs.

    The clue is to always be prepared for it and seize the moment as it may not last very long.

    Some examples.

    (1)This early morning fog was totally unexpected and made for some marvellous lighting for shooting steam engines especially as the steam and smoke mixed with the fog to make a great atmosphere.No harsh shadows at all and notice how the background disappears.

    The green machine

    Camera Canon EOS 5D
    Exposure 0.002 sec (1/500)
    Aperture f/6.3
    Focal Length 47 mm
    ISO Speed 800
    Exposure Bias -2 EV

    (2) For comparison - A couple of hours latter, near the location above, when the sun had burnt off the fog. Bright sunny day with just a few puffy clouds about. Notice the solid shadows.

    How to start an engine (1) A bit too much fire.

    Camera Canon EOS 5D
    Exposure 0.002 sec (1/500)
    Aperture f/5.6
    Focal Length 24 mm
    ISO Speed 100
    Exposure Bias 0 EV

    (3) Light misty rain 2:15pm on a late spring day. Notice the beautiful soft lighting.

    Greenbrier Park Vinyards (1)

    Camera Canon EOS 5D
    Exposure 0.006 sec (1/160)
    Aperture f/14.0
    Focal Length 105 mm
    ISO Speed 800
    Exposure Bias -1 EV

    (4) Even indoors, with most of the light coming from outside, an overcast/rainy day, can provide beautiful light. Here the light from a drizzly day was coming in through a very large open door to the front of the subject.

    Mystic shipsmith

    Camera Canon EOS 5D
    Exposure 0.01 sec (1/100)
    Aperture f/6.3
    Focal Length 45 mm
    ISO Speed 1600
    Exposure Bias 0 EV

    More to come

    -----------------

    Larger versions of the pics are on my Flickr stream
    Thanks for looking, and feel free to ask questions or comment.

    Richard
    Flickr stream.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/34094515@N00/

  • #2
    Excellent series!

    Excellent series on light Richard! The examples were helpful - it was great to see your thought process in regards to different lighting situations.

    Looking forward to more...
    Tola Seng
    StepByStep-Photography.com - Easy to learn, step-by-step photography tutorials.
    www.EdamoStudios.com - Portfolio

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks very much. I also learn a few things whilst doing them.
      Flickr stream.
      http://www.flickr.com/photos/34094515@N00/

      Comment


      • #4
        Light 8b.

        Weather - Storms

        You can shoot from any direction and not have any real worries like harsh shadows and glare. The main thing is to have wet weather protection for you and your camera.

        (1) It also makes for some great opportunities to capture something different. Shot in pouring rain

        Laurie Burton 1969 TVR Tuscan

        Camera Canon EOS 40D
        Exposure 0.003 sec (1/320)
        Aperture f/9.0
        Focal Length 320 mm
        ISO Speed 500
        Exposure Bias 0 EV

        (2) For landscapes, even at a motor racing track, storm lighting can be magical. Always be prepared as the lighting conditions may be fleeting.

        #29 Wes Dayton 1949 MG TC special.

        Camera Canon EOS 40D
        Exposure 0.003 sec (1/320)
        Aperture f/11.0
        Focal Length 100 mm
        ISO Speed 250
        Exposure Bias -1 EV

        (3) There were storms about one morning. Occasionally you do get lucky and a break in the clouds will put sunlight in the right spot. Very little post processing. This is an approaching storm and a few minutes latter it was pouring.

        Before the Storm

        Camera Canon EOS 40D
        Exposure 0.001 sec (1/1250)
        Aperture f/8.0
        Focal Length 135 mm
        ISO Speed 400
        Exposure Bias -1 EV

        (4) Why it always pays to have your camera ready to go. 3pm on a spring afternoon. There were showers about. Picture taken through the window of a tour bus on the way to visit this church. Lots of post processing to remove the window reflections.

        Kameruka Church (1)

        Camera Canon EOS 5D
        Exposure 0.004 sec (1/250)
        Aperture f/8.0
        Focal Length 85 mm
        ISO Speed 400
        Exposure Bias -2 EV

        More to come.
        ----------------------
        #1 Introduction
        http://digital-photography-school.co...roduction.html

        Part 2 of this series (Light #2 - How much? Enough #1. ) can be found here:

        http://digital-photography-school.co...nough-1-a.html

        Part 3 - Indoors (1)
        http://digital-photography-school.co...doors-1-a.html

        Part #4 - Low light outdoors (1)

        http://digital-photography-school.co...doors-1-a.html

        Part #5 - High contrast light.
        http://digital-photography-school.co...-contrast.html

        #6 Too much light.
        http://digital-photography-school.co...uch-light.html

        #7 Light direction.
        http://digital-photography-school.co...irectiuon.html

        #9 Time of day.
        http://digital-photography-school.co...day-shoot.html

        -----------------

        Larger versions of the pics are on my Flickr stream
        Thanks for looking, and feel free to ask questions or comment.

        Richard
        Last edited by RichardTaylor; 01-05-2012, 03:23 AM.
        Flickr stream.
        http://www.flickr.com/photos/34094515@N00/

        Comment


        • #5
          Dear Richard,
          Picture (4) under 2nd post: Very nice pic that record the blowing wind beautiful, excellent foreground-background tone harmony. Great 1st horizons level, and beautiful "Z" as extreme strong leading lines to the house, beautiful trees as deliminator frame, great color harmony for subject and surrounding, subject is beautifully placed not far from center... However, i have 1 doubt that :

          a) You are shooting at 1/250s but I still able to see motion blur for trees, . I thought 1/250s is sufficient to freeze running human..??


          b) Is the main horizon at dead center? If that so, what is your reasoning for doing so?
          Note: I use non-pure photography terms..


          c) As my observation for your pics about the exposure bias. ...
          the exposure bias = - the percentage of lit area, when using matrix meter and subject in lit area. How about if the subject is in dark area ? I believe you will never take any shot of that or do some framing to void that?



          for Pic #4 under 1st post : the man with hammer.
          If I reduce the shutter speed, perhaps to 1/70s with -2EV flash compensation (so to retain the natural light), combine with flash to freeze the motion of other part of body, but with a little bit of motion blur to record the act of hamming.. will that possible?
          Last edited by ccting; 01-06-2012, 12:50 AM.

          Comment


          • #6
            The trees have been slightly softened during post processing.

            It is a "grab shot".
            I had no control over my shooting position and very little control over when I took the photograph, as I was sitting in a tour bus. Otherwise I may have composed the photograph differently.

            Exposure bias is for:
            (1) Control the highlights and/or to ensure a correct exposure. Either by using the histogram or by use of the "blinkies" or from experience as to the subject itself and how it relates to the rest of the scene.

            Framing (either during shooting or when post processing), is always for compositional purposes, except on very rare occasions (like accident photographs).
            Last edited by RichardTaylor; 01-06-2012, 12:53 AM.
            Flickr stream.
            http://www.flickr.com/photos/34094515@N00/

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by RichardTaylor View Post
              The trees have been slightly softened during post processing.

              Exposure bias is for:
              (1) Control the highlights
              .

              My brain, at this moment, tells me that,
              a) exposure time / shutter speed controls highlight.
              b) changing exposure bias impacts the exposure time significantly

              Question: Is that true that exposure bias will influence exposure time / shutter speed that influence the highlight?

              Question: Faster shutter speed can retain highlight than slow shutter speed? If that true, any reasoning for this ..?

              TY ;D

              Comment


              • #8
                Exposure bias doesn't mean only time (shutter speed), it means total exposure.

                Reduce the exposure enough, and you reduce or eliminate .the blown highlights.

                Try it yourself.
                Flickr stream.
                http://www.flickr.com/photos/34094515@N00/

                Comment


                • #9
                  @Richard,
                  You must be using Nikon Camera body..

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Canon, and not always a DSLR, see the exif data.
                    Flickr stream.
                    http://www.flickr.com/photos/34094515@N00/

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Richard, thank you for this very clear, informative series on light. As a new photographer, I often find it difficult to deal with light conditions, so this is really useful information. Thanks also for including the exif information with each shot - it helps when I'm trying to set up a shot.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Thank you, and glad to be of help..
                        Flickr stream.
                        http://www.flickr.com/photos/34094515@N00/

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Thanks for posting this. I have a question ... how do you choose the 'right Exposure Bias'?
                          And when?
                          --
                          BP 19
                          Koutiala, Mali, West-Afrika
                          W: http://www.avonturiers.nl
                          P: http://www.flickr.com/photos/btwienclicks

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Experience: "In this light condition I've always needed +1-2/3 stops of exposure bias, so I'll start there."

                            Chimping: "Looks blown out on the back of my camera; I'd better dial in some minus EC and reshoot."

                            Histogram: "All stacked up on the left side, I'd better brighten it up a bit."

                            Or in post, but that can fail pretty badly.
                            Flickr

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              @ btwien clicks

                              In addition to doug's comments.

                              "When"
                              Probably easier to say "when not"
                              (1) Shooting manual
                              You will still need to take the nature of the scene into account.
                              (2) camera dependant, in a scene mode where you have very little control over the camera settings.
                              (3) When you are looking at an "average scene" ie; not a lot of contrast and not a lot of real bright subjects (snow etc) or real dark subjects (a black car for example).

                              #9 An average subject. This is a B&W conversion of a basically colourless subject shot in overcast lighting conditions so no harsh shadows. No exposure compensation.
                              Even though it was shot in auto the exposure is ok.

                              Tree trunk (B&W)

                              Camera Canon PowerShot G11
                              Exposure 0.017 sec (1/60)
                              Aperture f/4.0
                              Focal Length 6.1 mm
                              ISO Speed 200
                              Exposure Bias 0 EV
                              Flash Off, Did not fire

                              ------------------------

                              "how do you choose the 'right Exposure Bias'?"

                              If you are shooting with a the aid of a live histogram you can just dial it in as needed whilst watching the histogram.

                              If you don't have a live a live histogram you need to ask a couple of things.
                              (1) Do I want negative or positive exposure compensation?
                              (2) Are there any highlights that may blow out?

                              If you are shooting a predominately dark subject the camera will think the picture is too dark and will try to lighten it by increasing the exposure - so a black car may come out grey or dark grey.
                              So you will need to reduce the exposure to compensate. How much depends on the subject. This was probably one of the more extreme cases (along with the train picture above). Normally for the subjects I shoot it is around -2/3

                              #10 Here the subject was mostly darkish green and black engine. Light was diffused as it was morning fog.

                              Working on the railway (2)

                              Camera Canon EOS 5D
                              Exposure 0.003 sec (1/320)
                              Aperture f/10.0
                              Focal Length 75 mm
                              ISO Speed 800
                              Exposure Bias -5/3 EV
                              Flash Off, Did not fire
                              Exposure Program Shutter speed priority AE

                              Conversely if the subject is mostly very light, like snow or a beach in daylight, the camera will think the scene is over exposed and it will reduce the exposure making the scene look dark.
                              You will need to dial in positive exposure compensation. How much depends on the scene. I havn't shot in snow but I would be looking at possibly two stops.

                              #11 The light wall in the background made the camera think the scene was brighter than it was.

                              Pink rose.

                              Camera Canon EOS 40D
                              Exposure 0.003 sec (1/320)
                              Aperture f/5.6
                              Focal Length 400 mm
                              ISO Speed 200
                              Exposure Bias +2/3 EV
                              Flash Off, Did not fire

                              #12 Sometimes with high contrast scenes you may need to make a decision on what detail you want to preserve. Stopping the whites blowing out was the main concern here as it didn't really matter if the background was a little dark
                              Notice the exposure compensation..

                              Reflected light - 5 minutes from home.

                              Camera Canon EOS 40D
                              Exposure 0.001 sec (1/1600)
                              Aperture f/8.0
                              Focal Length 400 mm
                              ISO Speed 250
                              Exposure Bias -4/3 EV

                              Keep in mind there are other techniques you can use when shooting.
                              (1) In difficult lighting conditions you may be able top bracket your exposures.
                              (2) Using a different metering metering method (ie spot, instead of evaluative/are/matrix) may reduce the need to dial in any exposure compensation at all.
                              Flickr stream.
                              http://www.flickr.com/photos/34094515@N00/

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