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How to get that professional look in a portrait?

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  • How to get that professional look in a portrait?

    HI!!!

    Does anybody know how to take indoor portraits with a flash that will result in a "non-reflective face" (not shiny, but creamy). I have been wanting to be able to do it for a while, but haven't been able to so far.

    I will be using a nikon sb-700 flash.

    Thank you!!!

  • #2
    Proper exposure and good skin touch ups in photoshop.

    Here is what I mean... the picture on the left is properly exposed and not a bad shot. The one on the right has had some Adobe love.

    Scott
    Nikon D700, D300, 50mm 1.8, 85mm 1.8, 105mm f2.8, 28-75 f2.8, 35-70 f2.8, 80-200 f2.8

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    • #3
      I guess I should add, the larger the light source, the soft the light is. If you are using an umbrella etc, that will help or bounce off of a white wall or sheet etc. Get the light source as close as possible to the subject as well, because closer = larger.
      Scott
      Nikon D700, D300, 50mm 1.8, 85mm 1.8, 105mm f2.8, 28-75 f2.8, 35-70 f2.8, 80-200 f2.8

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      • #4
        It also has a lot to do with makeup. Oily/shiny skin is a problem...
        Steve
        the Photographic Academy.com
        SharpShooter Industries
        My 500px, My Flickr, My Blog

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        • #5
          Originally posted by spngebob View Post
          HI!!!

          Does anybody know how to take indoor portraits with a flash that will result in a "non-reflective face" (not shiny, but creamy). I have been wanting to be able to do it for a while, but haven't been able to so far.

          I will be using a nikon sb-700 flash.

          Thank you!!!
          Apart from a proper exposure you must use a diffused light source of some type. Whether is is a Diffusing dome for your SB700 or a soft box of some sort, you will get better results with indirect, bounced, or diffused flash

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          • #6
            Originally posted by sk66 View Post
            It also has a lot to do with makeup. Oily/shiny skin is a problem...
            Absolutely. Fresh make-up makes a huge difference.

            I can still work around it if I need to. This bride had just had her make-up done, but 100 degree weather was quickly taking care of that. I was still able to smooth out the shine coming through. I posted an example here:

            http://digital-photography-school.co...-b4-after.html
            Scott
            Nikon D700, D300, 50mm 1.8, 85mm 1.8, 105mm f2.8, 28-75 f2.8, 35-70 f2.8, 80-200 f2.8

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            • #7
              Well yes, but that is definitely "working around it" and requires some post skills as well. Would be a PITA for a large number of photos...
              Steve
              the Photographic Academy.com
              SharpShooter Industries
              My 500px, My Flickr, My Blog

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              • #8
                Originally posted by sk66 View Post
                Would be a PITA for a large number of photos...
                Uh huh..... damn sweat
                Scott
                Nikon D700, D300, 50mm 1.8, 85mm 1.8, 105mm f2.8, 28-75 f2.8, 35-70 f2.8, 80-200 f2.8

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                • #9
                  Thanks guys!!!

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                  • #10
                    Yup........it's all about the direction and type of lighting that makes a professional portrait.
                    http://pa.photoshelter.com/c/jimbryant
                    http://jimbryantphotography.blogspot.com/
                    (1) EOS 1D MKIII (3) EOS 1D's, (3) EOS1D MKIIs', (1) EOS1Ds MKII, 14mmf2.8, 16-35mmf2.8, 28-70mmf2.8, 70-200mm f2.8, 300mm f2.8 and a 400mmf2.8, (4) 550 EX and 1 580E speedlite, and a Speed a tron studio flash system.

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                    • #11
                      lighting i would say is the majority. and as what was previously explained, the model has something to do with it as well.

                      A good photo editing program will help. They all primarily work the same..you can adjust the clarity, saturation, brightness, contrast and so on with most photo editing software, but its always easier if you start out with a good exposure as what was explained above.

                      one thing i would suggest is learn the different types of lighting...for instance learn how to do loop lighting, rembrandt, split, butterfly and so on..this will help you get a better idea as to how to control the light at your model/subject.

                      you can also practice bouncing the light, which can make a somewhat inadequate situation turn into a great one.

                      Also be careful where to place your strobes or your key light, as you will develop strobe spots or flare in the model's eyes..for instance they say it tends to be more appealing if the light source is subtle or directed either at the 11 or 1 oclock position..if you use multiple strobes or light sources it will be evident in the eyes, and may or may not look as appealing.

                      but again, teach yourself how to control the light, and how to take a proper exposure and everything else will fall into place. I am still trying to learn the above mentioned, so its not something you can literally learn over night, it takes time and some good assistance.
                      http://jessemartinez.zenfolio.com

                      https://www.facebook.com/j.martinezphotog

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