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Help Please?! Properly exposing the sky with People in the shot...

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  • Help Please?! Properly exposing the sky with People in the shot...

    I did an engagement session today and I was trying to expose the sky while getting the couple that were pretty much immediately infront of me properly exposed... But I couldn't expose the sky nicely AND get them good...With a few of the shots I did I managed to get the sky OK with some post work, but there was so much more to the sky than I managed to get...

    Can someone help me?

    This is the photo:
    Pat&Angela-FG-72
    Camera: Nikon D80
    Exposure: 0.005 sec (1/200)
    Aperture: f/4.0
    Focal Length: 18 mm
    ISO Speed: 125
    Exposure Bias: 0 EV
    Flash: Auto, Fired, Return not detected
    The rest of the Exif data is here.

    Thank you in advance!
    ~ Fawn

    My New Site! {Out of Commission for a few days}
    My Gear, Photography Blog, Flickr & My Twitter

  • #2
    I expose for the sky and then let the flash properly expose the person, use a smaller aperture to get your shutter speed down to sync speed with your flash

    * when I remember, that is*
    view my photo stream: http://www.flickr.com/photos/kelleyrie/

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    • #3
      Could you maybe go into a bit more detail?

      For example, with the picture I posted - what would the numbers look like? I used a flash for it, but not my sb 900 because it died (Grrr! LOL)... So, say I have my 900, i then make the aperture smaller, then shutter slower... Mmm, kay perhaps I'm trying to make sense of this to late at night... lol Thank you, though. I have a general idea of what your saying.. lol

      Originally posted by kelleyrie View Post
      I expose for the sky and then let the flash properly expose the person, use a smaller aperture to get your shutter speed down to sync speed with your flash

      * when I remember, that is*
      ~ Fawn

      My New Site! {Out of Commission for a few days}
      My Gear, Photography Blog, Flickr & My Twitter

      Comment


      • #4
        Postwork

        Are you planning on photoshopping the image or reshooting?

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        • #5
          Use a GND - Graduated Neutral Density filter.



          Rotate the density to where you want less exposure - prevent's blown-out skies and it's especially useful for sunsets. Perfect tool for that shot of yours
          Last edited by JeffSmith; 01-24-2010, 06:13 PM.
          Jeff Smith

          Some of my stuff on Flickr

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          • #6
            I think what was being said it let your camera meter for the sky and use those settings in manual mode but now use your flash to provide fill for the people. That way the camera will expose the sky correctly and the flash will compensate so the people will also be exposed correctly.
            Nikon D800e, D300, D5000, NIKON GLASS 85mm F/1.8 D, 105mm f/2.8 Micro AF-S VR, 70-200 AF-S VR f/2.8, 28-300 AF-S VRII,10.5mm Fisheye, 24-70 AF-S f/2.8, TC-20E III AF-S, Sigma 12-24 HSM, Sigma 30mm f/1.4 HSM, Sigma 150-500 OS, 2 SB-600 Speedlights, SB-900 speedlight, 4 YN-622N transceivers, Manfrotto 190MF3 tripod & 322RC2 ball grip head. - NJ, USA
            Flickr Photobucket
            Ok to edit and repost my shots on DPS forums

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            • #7
              Originally posted by ericariker View Post
              Are you planning on photoshopping the image or reshooting?
              I already photoshopped the image and am gonna leave it as it appears and I don't plan to re-shoot, the clients are very happy with the pictures as they are... I am just trying to educate myself for the next time is all. Thank you


              Originally posted by JeffSmith View Post
              Use a GND - Graduated Neutral Density filter.



              Rotate the density to where you want less exposure - prevent's blown-out skies and it's especially useful for sunsets. Perfect tool for that shot of yours
              Perfect!!! Thank you - I will definitely look into one of those! Funny cause I was thinking polarized filter, but that seems a lot better. Thank you!


              Originally posted by kirbinster View Post
              I think what was being said it let your camera meter for the sky and use those settings in manual mode but now use your flash to provide fill for the people. That way the camera will expose the sky correctly and the flash will compensate so the people will also be exposed correctly.

              Thank you! That makes sense! Now so does the original post I replied to regarding this - I was just tired when I first read it lol. Thank you!
              ~ Fawn

              My New Site! {Out of Commission for a few days}
              My Gear, Photography Blog, Flickr & My Twitter

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              • #8
                Originally posted by JeffSmith View Post
                Use a GND - Graduated Neutral Density filter.



                Rotate the density to where you want less exposure - prevent's blown-out skies and it's especially useful for sunsets. Perfect tool for that shot of yours
                Only problem with a GRAD is if you have people in the shot, and the horizon is cutting through them, you will have a subject with two different exposures.
                Luke.
                500px
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                • #9
                  Originally posted by RLucas View Post
                  Only problem with a GRAD is if you have people in the shot, and the horizon is cutting through them, you will have a subject with two different exposures.
                  I was thinking about that.. I was a bit concerned about that... Hmmm...

                  But I do want to get one anyways, so, what one do you get for sunsets? the b&w one?

                  Thanks!
                  ~ Fawn

                  My New Site! {Out of Commission for a few days}
                  My Gear, Photography Blog, Flickr & My Twitter

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