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"Av" vs. "Tv" vs. "P" mode...

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  • "Av" vs. "Tv" vs. "P" mode...

    So, if you can indulge me for a few minutes, I'd like you help clarifying these three modes...

    In "Av" (apreature priority) mode, you change the Aperature setting in order to change the debth of field. (ie. Bokeh effect of a close up shot or an all crisp and clear shot of a landscape where all is in focus...) When you change the Aperature, the camera automatically adjusts the shutter speed to expose the photo to it's predetermined setting (which is also adjustable...)

    In "Tv" (shutter priority) mode, you change the Shutter Speed in order to change the motion blur of a moving object... (ie. A water fall with blury water or a fountain with each water drop frozen in time, or fast moving cars with backround blur or again frozen in time...) When you change the Shutter Sped, the camera automatically adjusts the aperature to expose the photo to it's predetermined setting (again which is also adjustable...)

    Now, In "P" (Program) mode, the camera determines a ration of aperature and shutter speed to match up with the predetermined exposure. You then adjust the ratio up and down.

    All three modes use the "exposure tri-angle", which I think I have an basic understanding of.

    So, when (and why) do you use P mode?? I'm thinking this would be a great setting to use to learn a camera and or a len's capabilities. It seems like an easy setting to use. You can snap off several shots in each ratio, and see the exact effect of each shot through out all the ranges.

    What mode did you (or are you) learn(ing) to use first??

    I guess this is just a post for me to make sure I have a decent grasp of these three modes...

    Any imput would be great...

    Thanks again

    Junior
    Canon Rebel XTi 400D; Canon 50mm F1.8 II;

    OK to edit, modify, and/or repost my pictures on DPS only...

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/junior_co/

  • #2
    Can I just say that I never really got the P mode? I went from Auto to S (Tv) and A (Av) and then went to manual. I just never really got how the P mode worked, and I wanted to learn to understand aperture and shutter speed more than I wanted to understand that. I think that I spent more time in A mode than S mode though because I felt that shutter speed wasn't as interesting as aperture at the time I still probably shoot that way to some extent, but now I know how to use shutter speed how I want too lol
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    • #3
      Originally posted by Junior_co View Post
      So, when (and why) do you use P mode?? I'm thinking this would be a great setting to use to learn a camera and or a len's capabilities. It seems like an easy setting to use. You can snap off several shots in each ratio, and see the exact effect of each shot through out all the ranges. ...
      Basically, you use "P" when you want to be in full-auto, but you also want to be able to adjust the ISO and/or the white balance setting. The green-box full-auto will not let you touch the ISO or white balance.

      I tend to think of P as the "training wheels" mode for folks who've never shot in anything but full automatic. But I suppose you could also think of it as an ISO-priority mode.

      I actually used P the majority of the time when I got my first digital camera (Powershot S3), because I couldn't quite relate all the functions of a digital P&S at first to my old film SLR. (It also took me months to get used to the whole idea of white-balancing--I was so used to seeing incandescent lighting causing that golden glow on film...
      Last edited by inkista; 04-10-2008, 05:04 AM.
      I shoot with a Canon 5DmkII, 50D, and S90, and Pansonic GX-7. flickr stream and equipment list

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      • #4
        Originally posted by inkista View Post
        Basically, you use "P" when you want to be in full-auto, but you also want to be able to adjust the ISO and/or the white balance setting. The green-box full-auto will not let you touch the ISO or white balance... ...But I suppose you could also think of it as an ISO-priority mode...
        I guess your saying that this is a full auto mode that will still allow you to change ISO and/or white balace...

        I didn't realize that you couldn't change ISO in full Auto mode...

        Originally posted by inkista View Post
        ...(It also took me months to get used to the whole idea of white-balancing--I was so used to seeing incandescent lighting causing that golden glow on film... ...
        That is another whole ball of wax that I'm not quite ready to get into...

        Thanks for the help there...

        Junior
        Canon Rebel XTi 400D; Canon 50mm F1.8 II;

        OK to edit, modify, and/or repost my pictures on DPS only...

        http://www.flickr.com/photos/junior_co/

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        • #5
          when i was just starting, i used P then read the exif of the image and recapture the same image on Manual. that's how i came to understanding what shutter speed, aperture, and iso was. these days, i am on almost full manual (i still rely on the autofocus of my camera, but i'm trying to teach myself to not rely on the autofocus more and more). learning how to manipulate the intesity of your flash on manual can be an itch, but brings you to a lot of understanding how the triangle affects artificial light made by flashes.
          canon 40d, 50mm 1.8/f II, 85mm 1.8/f, sigma 28-70 2.8-4/f, nissin Di622 (i lost this while i was drunk... huhuhu), a now working vivitar df200, and an open mind
          ditchedconcepts.com multiply

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          • #6
            Honestly, when I first started out I used Aperture Priority. Actually I wanted to jump right in into fully manual, but a friend of mine (who joined me in the testing of my camera as soon as I got it, an SLR user) told me to stick with A, because that's the one I will use the most. And, it is, because I love to manipulate the Depth of Field. I can say that I've only used the Auto on my camera for 2 shots, to test some stuff out, I used the P for 5-10 shots and the S for a single ocassion when I had to photograph someone's birthday party and another friend told me that she was using S with flash, I did the same . Manual and Aperture priority are really great, and I'm going towards full manual recently, especially in low light conditions, the only thing auto I use is the Auto-Focus, but I'm slowly getting the hang of the manual Focus too.
            The thing is to experiment with all the different modes that your camera has to offer and see how you can get the shot you wanted in the fastest time. Then you know you found the mode that will suit you best!
            I shoot with a Fujifilm S9600... and with a Zenit E (Industar 50-2, f3.5; Tele-Universar 200mm, f4.5) too
            notsowellEXPOSED
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            • #7
              Have a look at the "Using P, A, S and M modes" tutorial in my signature. It has a whole lot of information about these modes, as well as information about when to use them.

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              • #8
                I started out using P mode as well. In addition to changing ISO and WB, you can also shift up and down, and use exposure compensation. When you shift up or down, the camera increases shutter speed while opening the aperture (or the other way around) in a way that keeps a correct exposure. With these two together, you've almost got manual control.
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                • #9
                  I only very occasionally use the 'P' mode and find myself now mainly in 'A' mode. I didn't really start using my D80 properly (and by that I mean not relying on the full 'Auto' mode) until the last couple of months... mainly since joining this great site. I did go straight to manual mode at one point but and although I managed to get some good shots I decided to drop back to 'A' while still in the early stages of learning about how everything fits together.

                  I tend to experiment quite a lot and find myself taking the same shot with all the different modes just to try to get a handle on what effect each one can have on the picture.

                  Tiberius, thanks for that information.. extremely useful stuff and just what I needed
                  Cheers

                  Peter

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                  • #10
                    I have been afraid of using the full manual mode and manual focus (the manual focus on my camera is a pain). But, I was taking pictures in low light conditions a few weeks ago, and didn't think I was going to get any good pictures anyway so I flipped to manual mode just playing around - and guess what - I actually got some good pictures.
                    Also I have recently discovered that I love manual focusing - I just wish my camera didn't take "two hours" to adjust
                    ~wannabe
                    ~Wannabe
                    Canon Rebel XTi & 2 broken p&s NOW 1MP kid tough camera
                    Canon EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 II, Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 II, Canon 430EX Speedlite
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                    • #11
                      I wonder about the "Manual Syndrome". When in manual and one selects an f-stop the uses the meter to set the SS to get the correct exposure one has used Av. The same for Tv setting the SS then adjusting the f-stop to get exposure you have just manually implemented Tv.

                      P offers some neat benifits. It selects both SS and f-stop based on research of what the most used settings for this lighting condition. Some P's even take the FL used into consideration.

                      With this in mine I generally use P, that way is something happens quickly i will get a decent exposure. When more time is avaliable I shoot P then to. I put the camera to my eye note the suggested exposure values. If I do not like them a simple roll of the top wheel and the values change to correct the issue I have with its selection maintaining overall exposure values. If i see exposure compensation is needed a quick turn of the thumb wheel and all is done.

                      I use Av if DOF is the major concern or when using my CZ or Zuiko primes (both have no reporting or automatic features).

                      Tv honestly I do not remember the last time I used this mode. I use Av for sports as generally the DOF is of more concern than SS. I will adjust ISO if SS gets too low.

                      M. After 50 years of shooting in manual, we had no automatic features, the automatic features let one concentrate on composition rather than fiddling with dials just to be fiddling with them. Saying that there are times manual is a must. Those are times when the exposure must not change between exposures like when shooting pano's.

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                      • #12
                        Inkista: Thanks for the simple explaination of the P mode. I've always wondered what the difference between P and "Auto" was. That is a tremendous help. I'm trying to stay in Av. It's difficult in low light...I keep forgetting to adjust my ISO. A few more ruined shots and I might have it though.
                        Jul
                        Canon XTi
                        Tamron 28-80 mm f/3.5 - Canon 50 mm f/1.8 - Canon 55-250 mm f/4-5.6 IS -Sigma 28-70 mm f/2.8

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                        • #13
                          I m all over the modes really, i use Auto,Program, Shutter Prioirty, Appreture and Manual. It all really depends on my situation, If i m out ands its a pretty sunny day and i m just walking about i always keep my camera on P and somteims Auto? Why so if i see something that is just going to happen for the moment i can just torn my camera of and start to fire shots! You dont really have time to mess around with the appreture it takes time and sometimes you dont have the time to set everything up. But when i m wondering about the sam secenario and its dark outside i leave the camera in P mode and bump up the ISO to 200-400 depending really on the day (if there is a birght moon i keep it 200 vice versa)

                          But when i m shooting my indoors "studio" type of shots i like to go fully manual becuase i can controll everything alot better! and i knw what shutter speed and what appreture is going to do the image, so its really nice to have this freedom!

                          When i m out Shooting landscapes i tend to fluctuate form Appreture to Manual just because sometimes i like ot play with the lightning a bit, depends if its really birgh out or not so Bright...

                          Shutter prioirty is something that i dont use that often really, only when i want to get the panning effect, that the only time i find myself using this setting, for night shots i go manual and use trial and error but often findmyself shooting a larger appretures...

                          yeaht thats all i can say about my modes
                          Nikon D40x
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                          • #14
                            all those buttons!

                            I can't get up close and sharp when I use macro mode. I have a Sanyo s770. Are these types of cameras good for doing that? (Point and Shoot).

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