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  • Canon equivalent?

    I'm planning on getting a new camera, and I was interested in the Nikon D60, but I wanted the Canon equivalent, if their is one? I've just always been a Canon fan

  • #2
    From what I've found it is either the Canon Rebel XS / 1000D or the Canon 450D (Rebel XSi)
    Blog ---- Flickr
    Nikon D90, 18-105mm, PSE 9

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    • #3
      Out of curiosity, why are you looking at the D60? Is it simply due to the fact that an older model will be much cheaper?

      The Nikon D60 is a "consumer midrange" DSLR, and the Canon 40D is around the same age and also a consumer midrange. However, the prices are much different from what I could find (Canon being much more expensive).

      Although the Rebel line of Canon DSLRs are considered "entry level", the XSi (450D) is both cheaper and better (strictly numbers comparison) than the D60.

      If you want true contenders, you should look at the D3000 or D3100 (Nikon) instead of the D60 because they're cheaper, newer, and better.

      The D3100 stacks up nicely to the Canon T1i, for example.
      My flickr photostream

      Canon XTi, Canon 5D Mark II
      18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 (EF-S), 50mm f/1.8 II, Sigma 150mm f/4 Macro, 24-105mm f/4 L, 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6 L IS

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      • #4
        Originally posted by shocellist View Post
        The D3100 stacks up nicely to the Canon T1i, for example.
        Except that the T1i is an older model as well, as is the T2i. In reality the D3100 sits between the Canon T3/1100D and the T3i/600D.

        Here's a comparison of the D60 vs. the Canon T3i/600D

        Canon 600D vs Nikon D60
        Kevin
        Canon EOS 60D, Canon EOS T3i, Canon A-1, Canon AE-1 Program, Various lenses
        http://500px.com/VeritasImageryNW/photos
        http://veritasimagerynw.smugmug.com/

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        • #5
          I think you made the wrong comparison there...

          It doesn't matter how old it is--simply how good it is vs. how expensive it is. My point was that you can look at the D3100 instead of the D60 because it is cheaper and better (and newer is just an added benefit for some). There's not much of a comparison between the two; the D3100 wins. The rest of the post was comparing the D3100 to Canon models, and had nothing to do with the age of the Canon models. The T1i does in fact match up well to the D3100, and both are cheaper than the D60. The T3i is a better match to the D5000 or D5100.

          Comparisons don't really have anything to do with age (unless you're specifically looking for a camera that is a certain number of years old).
          My flickr photostream

          Canon XTi, Canon 5D Mark II
          18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 (EF-S), 50mm f/1.8 II, Sigma 150mm f/4 Macro, 24-105mm f/4 L, 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6 L IS

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          • #6
            @shocellist - Yes, but twice now you have brought up the fact that the D3100 is newer as a benefit. Therefore, if being newer is a benefit, then the T1i fails in that area as both the T2i and T3i are newer. And the fact of the matter is that the OP asked what the equivalent to the "older" D60 in the Canon line was (not what other Nikons line up). So the fact that you mentioned the Nikon D3000 and D3100 means that you weren't really responding to their actual question.

            So, to the OP, are you looking at new cameras or used ones? The reason I ask is that, as my link showed, the new "entry level" Canons (and Nikons) will outperform a body as old as the D60. In this other comparison, the base model Canon, T3/1100D, beats out the D60, at a lower price point. So, I'm curious what about the D60 interested you, as opposed to some newer models.

            Canon T3 vs Nikon D60
            Last edited by veritasimagery; 03-04-2012, 04:56 AM.
            Kevin
            Canon EOS 60D, Canon EOS T3i, Canon A-1, Canon AE-1 Program, Various lenses
            http://500px.com/VeritasImageryNW/photos
            http://veritasimagerynw.smugmug.com/

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            • #7
              I did respond to the actual question. Read my post.

              The Nikon D60 is a "consumer midrange" DSLR, and the Canon 40D is around the same age and also a consumer midrange. However, the prices are much different from what I could find (Canon being much more expensive).

              Although the Rebel line of Canon DSLRs are considered "entry level", the XSi (450D) is both cheaper and better (strictly numbers comparison) than the D60.
              My flickr photostream

              Canon XTi, Canon 5D Mark II
              18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 (EF-S), 50mm f/1.8 II, Sigma 150mm f/4 Macro, 24-105mm f/4 L, 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6 L IS

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              • #8
                Originally posted by shocellist View Post
                I think you made the wrong comparison there...

                It doesn't matter how old it is--simply how good it is vs. how expensive it is. My point was that you can look at the D3100 instead of the D60 because it is cheaper and better (and newer is just an added benefit for some). There's not much of a comparison between the two; the D3100 wins. The rest of the post was comparing the D3100 to Canon models, and had nothing to do with the age of the Canon models. The T1i does in fact match up well to the D3100, and both are cheaper than the D60. The T3i is a better match to the D5000 or D5100.

                Comparisons don't really have anything to do with age (unless you're specifically looking for a camera that is a certain number of years old).
                think i'll have to check that one out

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by veritasimagery View Post

                  So, I'm curious what about the D60 interested you, as opposed to some newer models.

                  Canon T3 vs Nikon D60

                  well i didnt want a really difficult to use dslr. its my first upgrade from my compact digital camera and from what ive found it seems the best sort of bet. i'd prefer a canon to a nikon though, because ive been told you can use any brand of lens on a canon as opposed to nikon lenses on nikons???

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                  • #10
                    You can use other lenses on Canon bodies with the proper adapter. And in many cases you will lose autofocus and or auto exposure. As far as ease of use, any of the entry level bodies will have any degree of automation you want to use as you learn the ropes. You can use them on setting from the fully automatic "green box" to full manual operation.

                    That is one of the great advantages of a DSLR..... options. Until you get all the way up to the professional level bodies, you will have all of those options, at least in the Canon line. I don't know anything about Nikon, but the Canon T series (T1i, T2i, T3i) are all great for learning about this type of photography. As you get to the newer models, you just get updated features, higher resolution sensors - with the T31 you get the articulated LCD making video and still shots from odd angles easier. They all accept the full range of Canon lenses, and will work with many other brands with varying degrees of functionality, depending on the lens and the adapter.
                    Rick

                    Canon 60D; EF-S 10-22 f3.5-f4.5 USM; EF-S 17-55 f2.8 USM; EF-S 60mm f2.8 Macro; EF100mm f2.8 L IS Macro USM; EF 70-200 f4 L IS USM + 1.4x II TC --- Soon to have: Fuji Finepix XP 200 Waterproof

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                    • #11
                      From what I understand, the entry level Nikon bodies do not have autofocus motors built in, so unless the lens has autofocus built in, you'll be forced to use manual focus. While this can be seen as a negative for Nikon... it also forces people to use manual focus, which I think hastens improvement.

                      As for the lenses, other companies also make lenses for Nikon too. For example, Sigma makes lenses for Canon, Nikon, and others. Tamron also makes lenses for Canon, Nikon and others. And you should lose no capabilities from using those lenses.
                      But it's important to note that you can't use say, a Nikon lens on a Canon camera (without an adapter) because the lens mount is different. The Canon DSLR bodies don't have universal lens mounts, in other words you'll still have to get a lens that is compatible with the body.

                      I don't think you'll have any problem learning on an entry level Canon or Nikon body. In general the entry level cameras have less buttons and dials, and sometimes the number of options are limited as well (eg. ISO might go 100, 200, 400, etc. while my camera has 100, 125, 160, 200, 250, 320, 400 etc.).
                      My flickr photostream

                      Canon XTi, Canon 5D Mark II
                      18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 (EF-S), 50mm f/1.8 II, Sigma 150mm f/4 Macro, 24-105mm f/4 L, 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6 L IS

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by shocellist View Post
                        From what I understand, the entry level Nikon bodies do not have autofocus motors built in, so unless the lens has autofocus built in, you'll be forced to use manual focus. While this can be seen as a negative for Nikon... it also forces people to use manual focus, which I think hastens improvement.

                        As for the lenses, other companies also make lenses for Nikon too. For example, Sigma makes lenses for Canon, Nikon, and others. Tamron also makes lenses for Canon, Nikon and others. And you should lose no capabilities from using those lenses.
                        But it's important to note that you can't use say, a Nikon lens on a Canon camera (without an adapter) because the lens mount is different. The Canon DSLR bodies don't have universal lens mounts, in other words you'll still have to get a lens that is compatible with the body.

                        I don't think you'll have any problem learning on an entry level Canon or Nikon body. In general the entry level cameras have less buttons and dials, and sometimes the number of options are limited as well (eg. ISO might go 100, 200, 400, etc. while my camera has 100, 125, 160, 200, 250, 320, 400 etc.).
                        +1 on all this. The only exception I would add (in favor of Nikons, unfortunately) is that all Nikon bodies will accept all Nikon lenses, including the older ones. That's not the case with Canon. While the ASP-C bodies can use all newer Canon lenses (EF-S and EF), the full frame cameras can only use the EF lenses. And neither the ASP-C and Full-Frame Canon bodies can use the old, manual focus, FD series lenses. Definitely a plus for Nikon, but not enough for me to give up me Canons.
                        Kevin
                        Canon EOS 60D, Canon EOS T3i, Canon A-1, Canon AE-1 Program, Various lenses
                        http://500px.com/VeritasImageryNW/photos
                        http://veritasimagerynw.smugmug.com/

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by shocellist View Post
                          The Canon DSLR bodies don't have universal lens mounts, in other words you'll still have to get a lens that is compatible with the body.
                          No, but as Preeb said, canon is the easiest to adapt to. Some pro landscape photographers use NIkon lenses on their cameras because they can - with an adaptor.

                          Originally posted by shocellist View Post
                          I don't think you'll have any problem learning on an entry level Canon or Nikon body. In general the entry level cameras have less buttons and dials, and sometimes the number of options are limited as well (eg. ISO might go 100, 200, 400, etc. while my camera has 100, 125, 160, 200, 250, 320, 400 etc.).
                          The shift in ISO numbers is something that is cntrolled by a menu option on Nikon bodies: it can be set to full-stops (100, 200, 400, etc), half stops, or third stops (100, 125, 160, 200, 250, 320, 400, etc)
                          I am responsible for what I say; not what you understand.
                          adammontpetit.com
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                          500PX | Graphic Design

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by veritasimagery View Post
                            +1 on all this. The only exception I would add (in favor of Nikons, unfortunately) is that all Nikon bodies will accept all Nikon lenses, including the older ones. That's not the case with Canon. While the ASP-C bodies can use all newer Canon lenses (EF-S and EF), the full frame cameras can only use the EF lenses. And neither the ASP-C and Full-Frame Canon bodies can use the old, manual focus, FD series lenses. Definitely a plus for Nikon, but not enough for me to give up me Canons.
                            Using a DX lens on an FX body, however, will vignette, and typically be cropped in-camera. While you can use the DX lens, you are pretty much "wasting" an FX sensor doing it.

                            Actually, the big advantage here is that you don't need an adapter, that you can use lenses in the native mount going back to 1959 vs. lenses going back to 1986 (i.e., lenses <25 years old), and that with higher-end cameras, like the D300, you can program the EXIF from the camera with a non-CPUed lens's max. aperture and focal length.

                            The disadvantages are that using lenses in other mounts is problematic without replacing the lens mount. You probably don't want to use pre-AI lenses if you plan on upgrading your body from an entry-level. On the Canon side of the fence with adapter rings, you can not only use all the Nikon F lenses (including pre-AI), you can also use lenses from five other camera systems. And a D3100/D5100/D90 will not meter with a non-CPU lens (I.e., can only perform wide-open metering, not stop-down metering). Canons, otoh, will perform accurate stop-down metering when it cannot detect a lens via the electronic contacts.

                            But no matter how you mount one of these old lenses, you have no autofocus, you have no aperture control from the camera body (only on the lens), and you basically lose the ability to shoot in any modes but full Manual and aperture priority. On top of that, going wide is a PITA because all the old glass was designed for film. And going fast is still going to be relatively expensive no matter which mount you're spelunking your way through. AND you have to know how to evaluate the working condition and the nomenclatures of vintage glass. You may also want to swap out a focus screen to help you with the manual focusing.

                            I find it fun. But it's not a path for everyone to take.
                            I shoot with a Canon 5DmkII, 50D, and S90, and Pansonic GX-7. flickr stream and equipment list

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                            • #15
                              Newer does not equal better.

                              A newer camera is not better than an old camera. It is just new. What you do with it matters a whole lot more than how old it is. I have a 60D and it is a fine camera. I also have an Elan 7NE, it is 8 years old and is still a fine camera. My Yashica FX-2 is about 35 years old; it too, is still a fine camera. My mom gave me a Brownie Hawkeye when I was 6 years old (it was new then). I wish I still had it. I will never use the FX-2 to shoot an indoor volley ball game; it is not the right tool for that. I will never agonize over just the right settings on the 60D; it can help me when the action gets rushed. Use the right tool for the job. Age does not matter.
                              5D, 60D - both gripped. 24 2.8 IS USM, 85 1.8, 100-400L, Σ70-200 f/2.8 OS HSM, 10-22, 15-85, Tamron 17-50 f/2.8 non-VC, Tamron 28-75 f/2.8, 20-35 USM, 28-135 IS USM.

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