Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Canon 1100D / 450D / 500D / 550D / 600D???

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Canon 1100D / 450D / 500D / 550D / 600D???

    OK I'm getting money for christmas from people to go towards my first DSLR. I was originally thinking a 1100D but have looked on Which and it has recommended these other models too. So now I'm really confused as to which to go for so any help / pointers from you guys would really be appreciated. I'm brand new to dslrs though so I don't know that much about the technical aspects. I'm sure I'll learn through being on this forum, reading the manual and practice but I don't understand all the jargon just yet.

    Also, other than the camera body and the standard lense they come with, what else would I need other than a bag? Flashes? I have a tripod already Anything else?

    Thanks in advance guys

    CANONestly say she loves DSLR photography ~ Newbie owner of Canon EOS 1100D / Rebel T3 with 18 - 55mm lens ~ Canon EF 70-300 f/4-5.6 IS USM ~ Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro lens ~ Speedlite 430EX II

  • #2
    Here's a chart of all the Canon dSLR models. The table goes (vertically) through the tiers from Pro down to entry-level, and across [left to right] by time, through the generations.

    Template:Canon DSLR cameras - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Generally speaking, the farther to the left the model is, the newer it is, and the better the sensor technology will be. The farther to the top the model is, the higher the tier, and the more features and heavier the build quality will be.

    The 450D/500D/550D are all older models. The 600D is the current dRebel model. It's an entry level camera, good for beginners, and for lower budgets. The 1100D is one tier below the 600D. It has fewer features, but it less expensive.

    Aside from a bag, you will probably need a lot of stuff. And a good sturdy tripod (one that costs three figures) is likely to be one of them, as is a flash, but honestly, you should wait and see what the kit lens can do for you, and what will frustrate you. Those frustrations are likely to lead you to the next bit of kit you're going to need. I'd also put off buying a bag for a little while, until you actually have more than one lens to tote around. The bag you need is going to continually change as you continue to add bits and pieces of gear, and you want to wait until you've got a basic set up before trying to shove it all into a bag. I quickly outgrew my first bag in only a few months.

    My main advice: don't go looking to buy gear. The desire to add things is going to naturally be there no matter what, but it's extremely easy to waste money on stuff you don't need, if you don't take the time to 1) make sure that it's not a technique issue first rather than the gear, and 2) analyze exactly what kind of gear you need (vs. want). Budget accordingly.

    Thirdly, take the time to learn about lenses. That's where most of your money is going to go in the end.
    I shoot with a Canon 5DmkII, 50D, and S90, and Pansonic GX-7. flickr stream and equipment list

    Comment


    • #3
      Like Inkista says, don't jump too quickly on accessories. As you learn more about the camera and how you like to use it, some of those will become obvious. You can really blow a lot of money on stuff that you end up not really needing. Also, it isn't a huge mistake to get an older model, as they all are quite close in image quality.

      My 500d was already a one year old model when I bought it new, but that just made it a better buy in my opinion. About all you really get between the 550d and the 600d is the articulated LCD screen on the 600d, which is mostly handy for macro photography where the camera has to be in awkward positions. Otherwise they are very similar.

      The biggest difference between my 500d and the 550d is 15 megapixels to 18 megapixels. Both are otherwise very similar. I like mine, but I haven't used the other ones on your list, so I really can't say much more than that. My sister still gets great photos with her Rebel, and it's 2 models older than mine.

      The lens is far more important when you are talking about differences in image quality between those 5 models. As long as you get the body new, get the best glass you can to go with it. The kit lenses can get you started, but they can also be somewhat limiting. As you progress, you will learn what else you need to add to your kit.
      Rick

      Canon 60D; EF-S 10-22 f3.5-f4.5 USM; EF-S 17-55 f2.8 USM; EF-S 60mm f2.8 Macro; EF100mm f2.8 L IS Macro USM; EF 70-200 f4 L IS USM + 1.4x II TC --- Soon to have: Fuji Finepix XP 200 Waterproof

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Mutter22 View Post
        other than the camera body and the standard lense they come with, what else would I need other than a bag?
        You need a memory card or two. Do you really need a bag?

        It's best to buy stuff after you decide that you need it. It's really easy to buy a lot of junk you're never going to really use.

        Are you planning on post-processing your photos? If so, you'll need a monitor calibrator and some software, at the least. After you've tried printing at your local mini-lab, you may decide that you need a printer, inks, and paper, too.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Preeb View Post
          About all you really get between the 550d and the 600d is the articulated LCD screen on the 600d, which is mostly handy for macro photography where the camera has to be in awkward positions. Otherwise they are very similar.
          Everyone seems to forget that the 600D has the same wireless flash capability that the 60D has. This is something that can be very handy down the road, and quite expensive to add on.
          Kevin
          Canon EOS 60D, Canon EOS T3i, Canon A-1, Canon AE-1 Program, Various lenses
          http://500px.com/VeritasImageryNW/photos
          http://veritasimagerynw.smugmug.com/

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Doug Pardee View Post
            You need a memory card or two. Do you really need a bag?
            Why would anyone question the purchase of a bag? I can see cautioning someone not to spend a ton of money on one right off, but to not have some way of protecting the camera when not in use is ridiculous. It's not like you're gonna use the packaging box. At least get a holster-style bag.
            Kevin
            Canon EOS 60D, Canon EOS T3i, Canon A-1, Canon AE-1 Program, Various lenses
            http://500px.com/VeritasImageryNW/photos
            http://veritasimagerynw.smugmug.com/

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by veritasimagery View Post
              Why would anyone question the purchase of a bag? I can see cautioning someone not to spend a ton of money on one right off, but to not have some way of protecting the camera when not in use is ridiculous. It's not like you're gonna use the packaging box. At least get a holster-style bag.
              I have a 5dmkii and a 60D, niether on has spent any time in a bag. Do I have a bag? Of course! It's where I keep all my lenses. If your camera is in a bag, you can't use it... If you can't use it, what's the point in having it?

              I suppose not everyone keeps their cameras with them everywhere they go, but then if it's not moving, what does it need protection from? ;D

              Comment


              • #8
                Keep mine with me, but it's much safer in the car, and on the motorcycle, when it's in a bag. Never had a problem using it. It's always ready to go. The bag holds the camera, lenses, flash, spare batteries, spare SD cards, filters, cleaning cloths, and anything else I need at hand.

                And you must not have children, or grandchildren. Keeps it safe from little hands.
                Kevin
                Canon EOS 60D, Canon EOS T3i, Canon A-1, Canon AE-1 Program, Various lenses
                http://500px.com/VeritasImageryNW/photos
                http://veritasimagerynw.smugmug.com/

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by veritasimagery View Post

                  And you must not have children, or grandchildren. Keeps it safe from little hands.
                  Lol I do! But she isn't old enoulph for sticky fingers yet

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Tzetsin View Post
                    Lol I do! But she isn't old enoulph for sticky fingers yet
                    Just wait. I have four kids that went through that stage. Now I have a 15 month old grandson that loves anything electronic.
                    Kevin
                    Canon EOS 60D, Canon EOS T3i, Canon A-1, Canon AE-1 Program, Various lenses
                    http://500px.com/VeritasImageryNW/photos
                    http://veritasimagerynw.smugmug.com/

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I have a 30 year old day pack which is my day to day walk-around camera bag. I use padded pouches for my lenses in the bottom compartment, and the camera with my 17-55 f2.8 goes in the top.I've been using this method with this pack since I bought my first SLR back in the mid 70's. I like that it gives the camera some slight protection, and there is nothing about it to advertise what's inside. In fact, after 30 years of travel and day hikes and you name it, the pack looks quite disreputable - pine sap stains, etc., which won't wash out - but that's fine. Just adds to the disguise.

                      I have a larger Swiss Gear pack which I use as my carry on bag for traveling. It holds all of my camera gear and my 17" laptop - weighs about 3000 pounds but that way my important stuff is never out of sight.
                      Rick

                      Canon 60D; EF-S 10-22 f3.5-f4.5 USM; EF-S 17-55 f2.8 USM; EF-S 60mm f2.8 Macro; EF100mm f2.8 L IS Macro USM; EF 70-200 f4 L IS USM + 1.4x II TC --- Soon to have: Fuji Finepix XP 200 Waterproof

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I would add a 50mm 1.8 lens - so cheap and so good at accelerating the learning curve (framing and exposure triangle)
                        Canon EOS 7D + 20D, 70-200mm F4, 17-55 F2.8 IS, 50mm F1.4, 550EX.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Thanks sooooo much for your replies everyone. They are really appreciated.

                          I think I will get the standard lens that comes with the package and then get another lens for my birthday once I've had chance to get used to using the camera and can work out what I need. Probably a 50mm 1.8 lens like you say Andrewdt.

                          Re camera bags... I do feel I need one. I intend to take the camera with me in the car so I can use it whenever and I also have 2 small children ( 2 1/2 yrs and 7 months) who, if they get their mitts on it will make a real mess of it lol. Even if they didn't I would worry that I would scratch the lense without a bag. I'm thinking of getting a fairly cheap and compact bag that will hold the body, a couple of lenses and a few other little bits. Then at a later point I can get an additional lense bag if required. A bag will also hide the fact that I have an expensive piece of equipment in the car. People will hopefully just think it is a food cool bag for the kids if they peer in my car as I have so much other kids equipment / accessories in there already.

                          Re camera model ... I think I'm erring towards a 1100D or 600D. Thanks for helping me narrow it down guys. I'm leaning towards to 600D but we will see how much money santa brings me lol. The Wikipedia Canon DSLR page was really useful thanks as was the info on lenses

                          Memory cards ... what would be a reasonable size? I don't mind splashing out on these as my hubby can get them pretty cheaply

                          I don't even knowwhat a monitor calibrator is lol but will look into them as I probably will want to edit photos.

                          Software... I currently use paintshop pro 7 but again need to look into other software as I feel I could get more out of something more up to date. I also don't have a manual for it so I've learnt how to do things by trial and error which isn't probably the best way to get the most out of it. Any recommendations welcome

                          Printer, inks and paper are already sorted
                          CANONestly say she loves DSLR photography ~ Newbie owner of Canon EOS 1100D / Rebel T3 with 18 - 55mm lens ~ Canon EF 70-300 f/4-5.6 IS USM ~ Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro lens ~ Speedlite 430EX II

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X