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  • What brand of camera is the best?!

    I'm wanting to buy a new camera, but I have no clue what brand of camera is the best to buy. Is there a certain brand that is better than others? Nikon, Canon, Kodak, Sony... What brand would you recommend?! There are so many out there!

    I currently have a Nikon. I really like it, but I would like to know if there are any better brands out there. I have no clue as to what brand of cameras I should be looking at. Please help!
    a passionate procrastinator with a Nikon D70 and no motivation
    my Flickr

  • #2
    I personally use a Sony A200 and I like it very much, but if you already have Nikon lenses my advice is to stick with Nikon.

    All the camera manufacturers provide good cameras with good image quality, chosing diferents compromises in regards of image quality.

    Another important thing is to hold the different cameras in your hand in order to see how they feel. Ergonomics is an important part also.
    Gabriel Skoropada
    Powered by Sony DSLR-A700
    my Gear
    my Flickr || my 500px || Redbubble || My Blog || Twitter
    Feel free to re-edit and re-post my pictures

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    • #3
      You say you have a Nikon, is it a Nikon point-and-shoot or a DSLR?
      And what are you shopping for? Do you want a(nother) point-and-shoot? A DSLR? A mirrorless interchangable lens camera?

      I mean, I can generally recommend Nikon or Canon if you just want a quality DSLR, but if you're just looking for a nice point-and-shoot there are lots of different choices.
      My flickriver

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      • #4
        _______Nikon_______
        please add me on facebook even if you don't like my photos. much appreciated!
        Colby Jack Photography on facebook

        :: Canon EOS 1V :: Canon EOS 3 :: 50mm f/1.8 :: 35-80mm f/4-5.6 ::80-200mm f/4.5-5.6 ::

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by TNH View Post
          ...Is there a certain brand that is better than others?
          In the general, overall-on-every-point "better" sense? No. There is no certain brand that is better than all the others at everything. If there were, chances are, the other brands wouldn't have survived.

          Can a specific brand/system be better for you? Possibly. Depends on what you shoot and how much you have to spend.

          At the $150-$200 P&S pricepoint (like your Coolpix S3000), they're pretty much all of a muchness. Pick the one with the features that appeal the most to you and go out and take pics.

          But if you're thinking of a new camera, chances are good your current one is frustrating you in some way. So, start by telling us what those frustrations are, how much you have to spend, and what you envision doing with the new camera, and maybe we can nail down some of the specs/models that could help you out.
          I shoot with a Canon 5DmkII, 50D, and S90, and Pansonic GX-7. flickr stream and equipment list

          Comment


          • #6
            @ TNH

            This is my reply to a similar question.
            ==========================

            What's the best camera?
            (1) It depends on your standards.

            (2) Your final publishing needs.

            (3) What, where, and in what lighting conditions you are shooting?

            This will determine what "features" you need (not want) for the body.
            Also what lenses you need.

            (4) How are the erganomics for you (it can make a huge difference)?

            (5) What is you budget?

            (6) What equipment do you have at the moment.

            For example I am a Canon shooter and if took the advice:

            Originally posted by 3bayjunkie View Post
            _______Nikon_______
            It would not be "best" for me as I would be replacing 2 bodies, at least 8 lenses and two flashguns.

            Similar would apply to anybody switching sytems.



            ---------------------------
            Flickr stream.
            http://www.flickr.com/photos/34094515@N00/

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Skoropada View Post
              I personally use a Sony A200 and I like it very much, but if you already have Nikon lenses my advice is to stick with Nikon.

              All the camera manufacturers provide good cameras with good image quality, chosing diferents compromises in regards of image quality.

              Another important thing is to hold the different cameras in your hand in order to see how they feel. Ergonomics is an important part also.
              Well actually, I don't have any other lenses besides the one on my camera. The one on my camera doesn't come off.
              Ok, I was planning on going into a store sometime and checking out all the cameras before I bought one. That's probably a great idea.

              Originally posted by ceremus View Post
              You say you have a Nikon, is it a Nikon point-and-shoot or a DSLR?
              And what are you shopping for? Do you want a(nother) point-and-shoot? A DSLR? A mirrorless interchangable lens camera?

              I mean, I can generally recommend Nikon or Canon if you just want a quality DSLR, but if you're just looking for a nice point-and-shoot there are lots of different choices.
              Well... uh... what is the difference between a point-and-shoot and a DSLR? And what is a DSLR...? Sorry, I'm not too smart about cameras. If you tell me what that means, then I can probably answer you questions.

              Originally posted by 3bayjunkie View Post
              _______Nikon_______
              Well, you got straight to the point! I guess that's what you have?
              a passionate procrastinator with a Nikon D70 and no motivation
              my Flickr

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              • #8
                DSLRS are cameras that may be configured (at a cost, in $$$ and physical size) to be the almost perfect camera no matter what the shooting situation - mainly becuse of interchangeable lenses.

                P&S cameras are very small, sometimes pocketable, general purpose cameras.
                Picture results can be good, in good light, or if you are using a tripod.

                They can be a bit sluggish to use (they may not be responsive).

                I use both styles of cameras.
                If I am shooting birds/motor sport or indoor concerts I will be using a DSLR

                If I am shooting 'scapes and close ups of flowers etc I will most likely be using my P&S camera.
                Flickr stream.
                http://www.flickr.com/photos/34094515@N00/

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by inkista View Post
                  In the general, overall-on-every-point "better" sense? No. There is no certain brand that is better than all the others at everything. If there were, chances are, the other brands wouldn't have survived.
                  That's true...

                  Can a specific brand/system be better for you? Possibly. Depends on what you shoot and how much you have to spend.
                  I mostly take pictures of people, animals, and landscapes.
                  I want a nice camera, but probably don't want to spend over $500. But if I found one that was just what I want, a little over my price range, I would probably still get it.

                  At the $150-$200 P&S pricepoint (like your Coolpix S3000), they're pretty much all of a muchness. Pick the one with the features that appeal the most to you and go out and take pics.

                  But if you're thinking of a new camera, chances are good your current one is frustrating you in some way. So, start by telling us what those frustrations are, how much you have to spend, and what you envision doing with the new camera, and maybe we can nail down some of the specs/models that could help you out.
                  Yes, my camera is frustrating me. It does basically nothing.
                  I bought my current camera before I really got interested in photography. I bought it to mainly take pictures at birthday partied, and just for fun. Then I got really interested in photography, and I found out that my camera really can't do much.

                  The things about it that really frustrate me-
                  • Most of the time, the pictures are bad quality.
                  • You can't change the aperture.
                  • You can't change the shutter speed.
                  • You can't change the lenses.
                  • You can't manual focus. The camera just auto-focuses everything for you. Sometimes it focuses on things that I don't want to be in focus.
                  • The only settings that you can change manually are the flash, ISO, exposure, and macro mode. Those are the only things you can change. The camera automatically does everything else.

                  I'm not the only one who has complaints about my camera. Here someone talks about what my camera can and can't do.
                  At the end, he said, "The S3000 is a mediocre camera. There's no way that you can get publishable photos out of this thing, and if you want any advanced features or plan to do any kind of semi-serious photography, this is not the camera for you. But it is passable for its price, and better than its predecessor by a mile. Basically, the S3000 is the kind of camera to keep around for quick, casual snapshots to post on Facebook or Flickr. But even at that, I'm still not sure if it's worthy of a purchase.'

                  So from a photographer's perspective, my camera is pretty useless. I want a camera that can take good pictures, not just snapshots.

                  Well, I told you my approximate price range awhile ago. What I would like for a new camera to do is,
                  • Be able to change the aperture (I think that's called 'aperture priority?')
                  • Be able to change the shutter speed
                  • To probably be able to change the lenses.
                  • And to have more manual controls than what my current camera has, that I listed earlier.
                  So what cameras would do these things?
                  a passionate procrastinator with a Nikon D70 and no motivation
                  my Flickr

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by RichardTaylor View Post
                    @ TNH

                    This is my reply to a similar question.
                    ==========================

                    What's the best camera?
                    (1) It depends on your standards.

                    (2) Your final publishing needs.

                    (3) What, where, and in what lighting conditions you are shooting?

                    This will determine what "features" you need (not want) for the body.
                    Also what lenses you need.

                    (4) How are the erganomics for you (it can make a huge difference)?

                    (5) What is you budget?

                    (6) What equipment do you have at the moment.

                    For example I am a Canon shooter and if took the advice:

                    Quote:
                    Originally Posted by 3bayjunkie
                    _______Nikon_______


                    It would not be "best" for me as I would be replacing 2 bodies, at least 8 lenses and two flashguns.

                    Similar would apply to anybody switching sytems.



                    ---------------------------
                    Thank you for responding! I said in my previous post what my price range is and what I am wanting. I don't have any lenses or equipment that was made specifically for my camera like that. So I can really buy any brand that I would want to. That is a good point, though.
                    a passionate procrastinator with a Nikon D70 and no motivation
                    my Flickr

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by RichardTaylor View Post
                      DSLRS are cameras that may be configured (at a cost, in $$$ and physical size) to be the almost perfect camera no matter what the shooting situation - mainly becuse of interchangeable lenses.

                      P&S cameras are very small, sometimes pocketable, general purpose cameras.
                      Picture results can be good, in good light, or if you are using a tripod.

                      They can be a bit sluggish to use (they may not be responsive).

                      I use both styles of cameras.
                      If I am shooting birds/motor sport or indoor concerts I will be using a DSLR

                      If I am shooting 'scapes and close ups of flowers etc I will most likely be using my P&S camera.
                      I think I see now. So, if I want a camera that you can change lenses with, I need to get a DSLR?
                      BTW, does DSLR stand for something?!
                      a passionate procrastinator with a Nikon D70 and no motivation
                      my Flickr

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        For under $US 500 (Adorama prices) you can get an entry level DSLR (not the latest models) with a kit (general purpose - good light) lens.

                        Canon or Nikon or Sony are all good brands.- it doesn't really matter.
                        Keep in mind that this may be the start of something big, you are buying into a system.

                        The good P&S cameras (I am familiar with the Canon G series etc) will be in a similar price range and will offer what you want, but no interchangeable lenses.
                        May be a bit unresponsive for catching "party" action.

                        Edit:
                        DSR - Digital single lens reflex.

                        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital..._reflex_camera


                        What he has over his shoulder (he is using a P&S)
                        Everybody likes having their picture taken (1) or what is wrong with this pic?
                        Last edited by RichardTaylor; 09-14-2011, 10:19 PM.
                        Flickr stream.
                        http://www.flickr.com/photos/34094515@N00/

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          DSLR = Decompressed Superior Light Recipricator.

                          What that means is that it takes the light from the lens into the camera sensor and converts it to a useable digital signal.

                          Anyway, NIKON roxxors. The first time I held a Nikon D7000 in my hands at the local Best Buy, I fell in love with it Love it!
                          please add me on facebook even if you don't like my photos. much appreciated!
                          Colby Jack Photography on facebook

                          :: Canon EOS 1V :: Canon EOS 3 :: 50mm f/1.8 :: 35-80mm f/4-5.6 ::80-200mm f/4.5-5.6 ::

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by TNH View Post
                            I mostly take pictures of people, animals, and landscapes.
                            Thank you SO much for not saying "people and nature." Drives me batty when folks do that. Nature can mean landscapes, wildlife, and flower macros: each of which has very different equipment requirements.

                            I want a nice camera, but probably don't want to spend over $500. But if I found one that was just what I want, a little over my price range, I would probably still get it.
                            Gotcha. Does this include money for the whole camera system? Or just the camera body? dSLR gear, unfortunately, can get extraordinarily expensive. A single lens can easily eclipse the cost of the camera body, and most of us end up with two or three. Given your subject matter choices, I'd say you want a telephoto zoom for the animals, a fast prime for the people portraits, and a good wide angle/walkaround for the landscapes. Or possibly an ultrawide. To start with, the 18-55 kit lens that comes with most entry-level dSLRs can cover your people & landscapes for a while, and a 50mm f/1.8 prime for portraits is in the $100-$200 range. But the animals and a telephoto zoom may take a while longer, or limit you to a consumer lens that won't be as sharp or fast as the $1000+ pro lenses, so your keeper rate will be lower.

                            It's doable. But you probably won't be able to get everything all at once.

                            Yes, my camera is frustrating me. It does basically nothing.
                            Yup. Sounds like you're ready for an SLR. When a P&S gets in your way more than it helps you out, that's when you start looking.

                            OTOH.

                            There are higher-end P&S cameras that can allow you just about everything except the changing lenses thing. My Canon Powershot S90 cost $400 when it was new. Today you could snag one, refurbished for under $300. It gives me RAW, full manual mode, and decent available light performance. I use it when I don't feel like getting a sore shoulder with a dSLR bag full o' gear.


                            (jury duty).

                            A P&S camera is like a swiss army knife: small, compact, cheap, portable, and does a lot of stuff pretty well. A dSLR is like a big red tool box: big, heavy, expensive, and you still have to buy all the tools, but you can get the right tool for the right task. If you just need to tighten a screw, a swiss army knife may be just as good. But if you need to pound a few hundred nails: you want the pneumatic nail gun.

                            It's kinda like that.
                            ... You can't manual focus. ...
                            A dSLR will let you manually focus, but it's not like on old cameras that were designed for manually focusing. It'll be far easier than with a P&S digicam, but chances are good that the autofocus system in a dSLR could be more accurate than trying to manually focus. The big difference is that a dSLR has more tools for you to tell it what to focus on.

                            The one thing you may seriously miss, though, going to a dSLR is there is no "macro mode" on a dSLR. To get macro capability you probably need to get a macro lens. It's the upshot of using a bigger sensor: you're using bigger lenses. And it's harder to get a longer lens to focus close than it is to get a short one to focus close.

                            So from a photographer's perspective, my camera is pretty useless. I want a camera that can take good pictures, not just snapshots.
                            And here's where you may want to also have a good rethink. I know what you're saying, and I agree a dSLR could help you out with plain old image quality. BUT. The difference between a snapshot and a good picture isn't so much the camera you take it with--it's the amount of thought you put into making the image in planning, shooting, and post-production. Great images were rarely done in a split second. Just because it only takes a split second to push the shutter doesn't mean that's all the time that went into creating the image.



                            This image was taken with a 3 megapixel Canon Powershot S30. In "P" mode. I set the iso as low as possible to get a longer shutter speed, and stuck the camera on a mini tripod and used the timer to avoid camera shake blur from when I hit the shutter button. I saw the possibilities in the moving crowd and the unmoving security guard, and the contrast between the sculptures in the background and the crowd in the foreground, and composed accordingly. Yes, the camera could be frustrating as hell with its limitations (and it had PSAM modes and shot RAW). But that doesn't mean it forced me to take snapshots.

                            All a dSLR is going to do is remove some gear limitations. It's not going to inspire you or instantly confer better composition skills to you, or get fascinating subjects to automatically walk in front of your lens. You still have to do the work. It's weird, but some folks forget this part.

                            Ok, to wrap this up, I'd say you might have enough budget to get a used entry-level dSLR with an 18-55 kit lens from one or two generations back, and that might be the best way for you to go. Maybe a Canon 500D/550D or a Nikon D60/D5000 would be worth looking at.
                            I shoot with a Canon 5DmkII, 50D, and S90, and Pansonic GX-7. flickr stream and equipment list

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by RichardTaylor View Post
                              For under $US 500 (Adorama prices) you can get an entry level DSLR (not the latest models) with a kit (general purpose - good light) lens.

                              Canon or Nikon or Sony are all good brands.- it doesn't really matter.
                              Keep in mind that this may be the start of something big, you are buying into a system.

                              The good P&S cameras (I am familiar with the Canon G series etc) will be in a similar price range and will offer what you want, but no interchangeable lenses.
                              May be a bit unresponsive for catching "party" action.

                              Edit:
                              DSR - Digital single lens reflex.

                              Digital single-lens reflex camera - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


                              What he has over his shoulder (he is using a P&S)
                              Thanks!! Seeing the picture and the link helped me understand better. Thanks for all you're help!

                              Originally posted by 3bayjunkie View Post
                              DSLR = Decompressed Superior Light Recipricator.

                              What that means is that it takes the light from the lens into the camera sensor and converts it to a useable digital signal.

                              Anyway, NIKON roxxors. The first time I held a Nikon D7000 in my hands at the local Best Buy, I fell in love with it Love it!
                              Thanks! Is Best Buy a good place to look at cameras?
                              a passionate procrastinator with a Nikon D70 and no motivation
                              my Flickr

                              Comment

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