Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Full Moon

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Full Moon

    What can I do to really make my lunar shoots pop???


    Camera Canon EOS 7D
    Exposure 1/125
    Aperture f/13
    Focal Length 250 mm
    ISO Speed 100
    White Balance Color Temperature(3300K)
    Website 'Like' My Facebook Page Site #2 Flickr

    Canon 7D | Canon 24-70mm L USM | Canon 28-135mm USM | Canon 50mm 1.8 | Sigma 18-250mm | Nissin Di866 | MBP |

  • #2
    Most of mine have been hit or miss, and I actually do better with my point and shoot than the SLR.
    See below some good tips.
    How to Photograph the Moon (With 10 Great Examples) | Light Stalking

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by mattjordan View Post
      What can I do to really make my lunar shoots pop???


      Camera Canon EOS 7D
      Exposure 1/125
      Aperture f/13
      Focal Length 250 mm
      ISO Speed 100
      White Balance Color Temperature(3300K)
      Looks good, needs to be cropped, too much dead space, and more zoom, if you have a bigger lens. But it looks like a great shot.
      Joe

      Nikon D90, 18-105mm, 55-200mm, Wireless Hotshoe, 3 wireless speedlite YN460

      Comment


      • #4
        Hey dude good shot .
        Could have digitally processed, which makes look even better.
        Selvam Anand

        Comment


        • #5
          great shot of the moon! Something in the foreground would make it pop, clouds, trees, something to give it scale.
          http://www.flickr.com/photos/klementowski/

          Comment


          • #6
            I think that it's difficult to make a full moon image pop like you could a "lesser" moon like a crescent. When the moon is full, the angle of the light hitting it (relative to Earth) is rather steep, so you don't get the shadows along the leading rim of craters and behind rocks. It is these shadows, I believe, that can really make an image pop.

            In order to capture those nicely, one technique is to increase your focal length as much as possible (or as is reasonable), underexpose the image by a few stops (probably need to play with different levels of underexposure), and then bump up the contrast in post-processing until the image looks sharp and properly exposed.



            andrew
            AndrewSieveke.com

            Comment

            Working...
            X