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  • Left or Right?

    It was a foggy day today.

    Which do you prefer?

    Reading Railroad Bridge


    Reading Railroad Bridge by skersting66, on Flickr

    Camera Nikon D4
    Exposure 0.008 sec (1/125)
    Aperture f/10.0
    Focal Length 24 mm
    ISO Speed 200

    Any other critique is also welcome.
    Last edited by sk66; 03-09-2013, 02:17 AM.
    Steve
    the Photographic Academy.com
    SharpShooter Industries
    My 500px, My Flickr, My Blog

  • #2
    I like the first photo.
    Michael - Nikon D7000 - NIKKOR 18-200mm F/3.5 - 5.6 ED DX VR II Lens

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    • #3
      Second one - mainly becuse the bridge stops my eye from leaving the page more..
      Flickr stream.
      http://www.flickr.com/photos/34094515@N00/

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      • #4
        first

        I'd go for the first one simply because people look at an image from left to right in my view. So leaving the left section empty and starting from the right might be a way to 'shock' the viewer perhaps or make a more 'unconventional' shot. For me, however, the first is more pleasing to the eye. Great shots, though.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by argonaut View Post
          I'd go for the first one simply because people look at an image from left to right in my view. So leaving the left section empty and starting from the right might be a way to 'shock' the viewer perhaps or make a more 'unconventional' shot. For me, however, the first is more pleasing to the eye. Great shots, though.
          +1 on that. I tend to like leading lines from left to right.

          Great shots by the way!
          Zafar
          Nikon D300s, Nikkor 50mm F1.4G, Tamron SP 24-70mm F2.8 VC, Tokina 11-16mm F/2.8, Tamron SP 70-200mm F2.8 VC, Nikkor 18-300mm F3.5-5.6, Nikon SB 900
          Flickr http://www.flickr.com/photos/zafarsami/

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          • #6
            Interesting...I find the image "reads" both ways.
            In the first image you follow the bridge "into" the image, but arrive at "nothing." Since there is nothing solid to anchor the eye it wanders back.
            In the second you follow the bride from "nothing" out of the image, but end at something "defined" and to anchor the eye. But since it's "out of" the image the eye wanders back.

            Neither image is "easy," but since the "point" of the image is the bridge fading off into nothing being engulfed by the fog, I suppose the first image might be "better." I really don't know what to do with it. The second image is how it was taken...
            Steve
            the Photographic Academy.com
            SharpShooter Industries
            My 500px, My Flickr, My Blog

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            • #7
              I kinda like the second image better. Maybe it's because I'm right handed. I don't know. But my brain seems to be more comfortable processing the second photo. Beautiful shots either way. Very nicely done.
              Rick
              JustMe
              Canon EOS 40D

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              • #8
                Originally posted by sk66 View Post

                Neither image is "easy," but since the "point" of the image is the bridge fading off into nothing being engulfed by the fog, I suppose the first image might be "better."
                That was my first thought, that I was looking at a bridge fading into the fog, so the first worked for me. But then, since the second one at first glance is not what my eye expected, I actually lingered on it longer. But I'm not sure if that'd be true if I hadn't seen it right after the first one, if that makes sense.
                My Website: Carissa Lyn
                My Flickr Photos
                Nikon D5000 | Tamron 28-75 f/2.8 | Tamron 70-200 2.8 | Sigma 70-300mm f/4-5.6 | Nikon 50mm f/1.8 AF-S | Various speedlights & lighting equipment

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                • #9
                  The first one definitely works better for me! Funny how everyone's opinion is different on this Right vs left "sidedness"?
                  Lisa
                  All you touch and all you see is all your life will ever be (c)
                  Canon 7D, 17-40 f/4L, 100-400 f/4.5-5.6L, 50mm f/1.8II, 40mm f/2.8, Tokina 11-16 f/2.8
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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by CarissaLyn View Post
                    That was my first thought, that I was looking at a bridge fading into the fog, so the first worked for me. But then, since the second one at first glance is not what my eye expected, I actually lingered on it longer.
                    I have the same "feeling". With the first image you get to the end of the bridge and it's "done." Nothing more to look at. With the second image I end at the bridge and reflection and linger a bit longer, even "starting over" for further consideration... I suppose it is then a bridge "coming out of the fog." But unfortunately it doesn't "stop" at/on anything.
                    Last edited by sk66; 01-14-2013, 04:38 PM.
                    Steve
                    the Photographic Academy.com
                    SharpShooter Industries
                    My 500px, My Flickr, My Blog

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                    • #11
                      In film: left to right is faster; easier, smoother - right to left is slower; showing resistance. That's why people chased through the dark forest by the axe wielding fiend run from right to left. This is usually not counted in photography and preference is often with the person viewing but... there is a tiny underlying feeling about this left/right idea. We've been trained to it since childhood just by reading books and watching T.V.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by webcat View Post
                        We've been trained to it since childhood just by reading books and watching T.V.
                        Well, "we" being english based/euro based have, but not everyone...
                        Steve
                        the Photographic Academy.com
                        SharpShooter Industries
                        My 500px, My Flickr, My Blog

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                        • #13
                          I prefer the first one, because I can't even see the bridge in the second.
                          Nikon D810, Nikon AF-S 24-70mm f/2.8G ED, Nikon AF-S 16-35 f/4G ED, Nikon AF-S 70-200mm F/2.8G ED VRll, Nikon AF-S 105mm Micro f/2.8 if-ED, Nikon 300mm f/4eG PF VR IF ED, SB-600, SB-910, Nikon T14E and 17E teleconverters, Fujifilm XT-1, XF 50-140 F/2.8, XF18-135 F/3.5-5.6, XF56 F1.2, XF10-24 f4.0.
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                          • #14
                            Ok, I lifted the fog in the second one for you.

                            Damn LR plugin....
                            Steve
                            the Photographic Academy.com
                            SharpShooter Industries
                            My 500px, My Flickr, My Blog

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                            • #15
                              In one of my composition books (I think it was David DuChemin), the author talks about the psychology of left-right combined with up-down. When going from left-to-right (natural direction for western countries), then going downhill is easier and faster and therefore "smoother" (as someone on a earlier page for this thread mentioned). But, when going from left-to-right, if it's going uphill, then it implies more stress or hard work and it's supposed to be slower.

                              I'm not sure that I always agree with that in what I see in various images, but I don't get paid for my opinions.
                              Dave.
                              Some pictures... (500px)

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