Beginner’s Tip: Get Closer

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I work with a lot of people just starting out in photography. People who want to move off of Auto mode and on to something more. And they show me their images, asking, “What can I do better?”

I’ve started noticing a pattern in many of the images I have seen from new photography enthusiasts. It’s not absolute, but it is common enough that I write here today offering this bit of advice: Get closer.

Here’s the pattern I see when I ask new photographers to photograph something of interest. I’ll illustrate the flow with photos most students start out with.

First, they find something interesting, like this splotch of moss on a tree trunk. They think it’s different and those who haven’t visited Washington often remark at the different varieties of moss we have here. If only we could export it for gold.

PeterWestCarey-Closer-20120206-104912-1294

The photo above is what I see a lot of. It’s not horrible, but it is not what the shooter really wanted to capture. They see the moss, they see the tree and they just take a shot, from about four feet away and zoomed out. But the image brings in the background and there is nothing special. They often frown at the camera at this point. Then turn to me with that frown, shrug their shoulders and look for advice. “Get closer.” They sigh again and take a step in.

PeterWestCarey-Closer-20120206-104918-1295

The moss gets bigger but they complain about the distraction of the person on the sidewalk in the background. More frowning. “Get closer.” One more step straight forward (moss really is cool).

PeterWestCarey-Closer-20120206-104926-1296

Straight on. They are a bit amazed their camera can take a picture so close, to be honest. Some, picking up on the theme, will take things even closer but most of the time, the lens and camera combination won’t allow focus at that range. At this point, they have a close image but everything is in focus and there is no depth to the image. They still aren’t happy, but getting there (at least the sidewalk isn’t visible!).

At this point we take another tack. I have them move to the side. To try another angle. By now they still aren’t sure I’m sane and this is par for the course. Perhaps there is a magic button on their camera that makes pretty pictures? “No,” I reply, “but that’s actually good news.”

PeterWestCarey-Closer-20120206-104933-1297

Now the eyebrows raise up a bit. There’s interest in the image. A bit of angle has added in some depth (even at f/9) and the moss is starting to become interesting. They know what’s coming by now if they were to turn to me and ask, so they tentatively ask, “Closer?”  “Yep. And zoom in just a bit.”

PeterWestCarey-Closer-20120206-104941-1298

“Oh wow,” is often heard at this point. They didn’t know their camera could take a photo with a clear subject and no distractions. They were able to get a bit closer than when straight on and they now have a focal point. But the aperture is still set to f/9 and bringing in a lot of the moss. So I have them lower the aperture as far as it will go (while still looking through the view finder as it is good practice to learn to adjust settings while looking through the viewfinder if you have one).

PeterWestCarey-Closer-20120206-104945-1299

Now at f/5.6 in this case, the focal point is narrowed down and they have an interesting picture. Will it make the cover of National Geographic? Not likely. But I’ve come to understand people learn in baby steps and this is a big one for most; realizing there is more to shoot than the broad view, with a wide angle lens, four feet back.

If you’re starting out, repeat the mantra to yourself the next time you have a subject in front of you and are frowning at your camera’s display of an average image.

Get Closer.

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Peter West Carey leads photo tours and workshops in Nepal, Bhutan, Costa Rica, Panama, Alaska, Seattle and Los Angeles. He is also the creator of 31 Days to Better Photography & 31 Days of Photography Experiments, web-based tutorials taking curious photographers on a fun ride through the basics of learning photography.

  • Robert Capa is often quoted as saying: “If your pictures aren’t good enough, you’re not close enough”.

  • This is a great tip. I am very guilty of always capturing the wide view and not getting closer. The devil is in the details so they say!

  • Nice article Peter. Thank you.
    I’ve found getting close to be quite a psychological barrier in street photography, but in nature I like it a lot.
    Here is one of my recent shots that shows that getting in closer is a joy in what it can sometimes surprise you with.

    http://wp.me/p268wp-6w

    Thanks again for the great article.
    Mike.

  • Arch

    Great tip. I love how the progression goes from something blah to a keeper. Will keep this in mind when shooting.

  • My attempts at being ‘closer’ for a more interesting photo. One with people, one with shrubbery.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/45517597@N07/6250354090/in/photostream

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/45517597@N07/6245352500/in/photostream

  • Traciatim

    This is about the exact opposite of advice that I try to give people using point and shoots to take a shot of people. I always find people just stand where ever they currently are and then zoom out until they can fit the person in the picture and take a shot. So you end up with 28-35mm with people with big noses and small foreheads. So generally I try not to get in to the details of distortion, but give the advice of “step back, zoom in”.

  • Thanks for the great example! I like how you talked about alternating between moving in closer and changing the angle to get a different perspective.

  • Andreea

    The moss in the picture has the form of an elephant, especially in the third photo.
    Nice article btw.

  • I too suffered from this and as I learned the value of getting closer a great exercise was to go back through my first photos and crop them tighter. I found that many so so photos became good and even great photos when I cropped them closer. It was also a great opportunity to apply the newly learned rule of thirds.

  • I somehow love getting closer and filling the frame but the birds are not so receptive to the idea sometimes.

    http://blogs.gonomad.com/traveltalesfromindia/2012/02/a-blue-throat.html

  • raghavendra

    This totally depends upon the subject.
    we cannot take a closer shot for every picture.

    http://raghavendra-mobilephotography.blogspot.com/2011/06/close-shot-of-insect.html

  • I love this article! Great advice! I know I am guilty of this most of the time. I always try and remind myself. Even if its only to get a different perspective.

  • dgd

    Great advice. I tell this to my friends all the time. For beginners that just bought a camera and feel overwhelmed on where to start, I tell them: get close, follow rule of thirds, shoot wide to get some depth. Once they get comfortable. Their photos will start to look really similar, at which point they will develop new techniques and continue to improve.

  • Barry E.Warren

    Getting closer is good, screw on some macro lens and even get closer.

  • Hi

    Great article – I like to get close when using a wide angle. I love the perspective it lends. Here is a shot of a Harley Davidson taken in San Diego against a colorful mural

    http://kerstenbeckphotoart.wordpress.com/2012/02/07/night-rider-chicano-park-san-diego/

  • Alexander DiMauro

    What I like best about this article is that you show the whole progression, not just before and after. That really helps a great deal. Thanks!

  • oppimaniac

    You are absolutely right. The question always is: What is needed to tell the story?
    And it could be done with a simply cam as well.
    https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-4fF6IKUi9zU/TzLPNY5zvaI/AAAAAAAABgI/-oJu3FDRkrQ/s1024/DSCF4457.jpg

  • jim

    I dont think that getting closer is what you should be teaching. How about framing and composition? Shooting the moss you did both of that. You identified the subject and then taught them that when they apply basic com-positional and framing laws the image becomes a much better story.

    The last frame you even applied rule of thirds and taught them about dof. Photography 101. Nice job.

  • Zaman Khan

    I keep a kenko macro extension tube on my wide angle 10-20 lens, Does wonders for nature photography. Get in close with a wide angle lens, opens up a new world.

    One thing that i kinda would say is get closer but don’t zoom in, wide angle lenses are made for getting in closer more than zoom lenses i would say.

  • ccting

    What if your subject is a crocodile or a tiger l:

  • Scottc

    A great way of explaining DoF and teaching how to work with it.

    I think each of these photos represents one or more steps “closer” than most would take under the circumstances.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/lendog64/sets/72157629237254709/

  • OnyxE

    I came to naturally get close to geese because I loved their faces but probably don’t think to do it for other subjects. http://www.flickr.com/photos/marionlynne777/6839908041/in/photostream/lightbox/

    I took one close head shot of a goose once and after looking at the photo saw I was clearly reflected in the goose’s eye…had I been closer in that one and just got the eye and reflection it would have been a really neat photo.

  • Al

    I had a similar Moss on tree encounter last summer only it was with a mushroom:

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/albertshu/6414340913/in/photostream

  • Here’s some up close and personal shots of the 119:

    http://jeffejensen.blogspot.com/2012/01/119-up-close-and-personal.html

  • As someone once said, “Artists are concerned with what they want to include. Photographers are concerned with what they can exclude.”.

    I think this attitude we all have when we first start is down to the fact that we think that becuase the best images we see include so much vivid detail and interest we think that just grabbing everything in the frame will automatically make it interesting. We don’t realise that the masters of the art have checked, checked and double checked that the composition is perfect before they even put the camera on the tripod. The master snapper has a pretty damn good idea about what will make a scene work, what needs to stay in and what needs to be kept out, well in advance of thinking about the kit needed.

    Took me about 4 years to learn to look with my eyes first, not the viewfinder. Then to “sweep the frame” when I am ready to shoot and looking at composing. Not saying I am any good but it took me thousands of shots and years before I learned to think before I act!

  • David

    Good article, my Panasonic has a magic button, called iA, don’t know if it’d work magic for moss but its so good I usually ignore aperture mode and program on my G2 and just let the magic happen!

    Not tried extension tubes with a wide angle zoom, going to give that a go with my Nikon D90 and the Tokina 11~16 zoom…..thanks for the thought!

  • This advice can work, even with birds:

    http://brewstersoft.com/photo-of-the-day/please-please-come-closer/

    I’ve always liked macro shots, unfortunately they tend not to mesh well with my liking of landscape and wildlife shots. These birds on my porch, however, let me get fairly close – and I could easily crop any of those shots to get a full-frame image, since they are 18 mega pixel.

  • Dave

    If I’m not shooting birds and alligators with my 400mm prime I like to shoot up close with my 10-22mm zoom set to 10mm. I wait until the action fills the FOV (or more) and tumble out of the way to avoid being run over.

  • John P.

    Great advise. I find that the reverse can hold true when you’re photographing landscapes. Instead of zooming in on your subject, take a minute to zoom out as well.

  • I’ve just written a blog post about getting closer in street photography…

    http://www.edwalkerphotography.com/2012/02/01/getting-closer/

  • ksw

    Thank you. Great great example and shot series. I really thought I was going to be disappointed – Or that you would change lenses… Really good.

  • JustJoyce

    Help – I don’t see the difference between frame at f/9 and frame at f/5.6. Helpful article though.

  • I’m a beginner, and this was really helpful! The photos really helped me understand it… thanks! I will try to remember that next time I go out to shoot!

  • As a newbie to DSLR within the last few months, I know I didn’t consider getting closer until a few weeks ago on a nice foggy morning.

    Here is my result. http://www.flickr.com/photos/jcarley/6843969561/in/set-72157629251758937/

    Will definitely be reminding myself to get closer from now on!

  • Your’re spot on with this one. I can’t believe how much more interesting some of my images become when I zoomed in close, change the angle and aperture.

    I’ve only had a DSLR camera for around a year, but now that I’ve taken umpteen thousand shots since then, I am gradually learning to ‘see’ through the viewfinder and experiment with the camera settings.

    It’s been a gradual learning curve, but I can attribute a lot of the improvement to browsing Professional Photographer’s websites and blogs. I make a decision or whether I like or dislike the compostion and then seriously try to work out why I like it.

    In some cases, I’ve succeeded to apply the same approach in my own photos, but when it comes to other areas I’m not so successful.

    It’s all a matter of practise, practise and more practise, and opening your eyes to see ‘outside the box’.

  • Dave

    Don’t zoom, get physically close to the subject! Give it some depth. When you zoom in from some distance the subject will be flat and uninteresting.

  • gail

    @JustJoyce – the background on the shot at f5.6 is more blurry.

    Shooting close is one of my favorite things! Thanks for a wonderful article.

  • Speaking of bees, here’s another one I got, of a bee this time:

    http://brewstersoft.com/photo-of-the-day/two-bee/img-1915.html

    The bee isn’t as sharp as I would like, but I do like how the background blurred into nonexistence.

  • Friend

    My attempt in the past in trying to get close –
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/65728881@N08/6274229680/in/photostream/

  • john j

    This is a picture where I got in close to a pine cone lying in the backyard. Getting in close brought out a lot of the detail and texture.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/gtyellojacket/6094763276/

  • Joel

    Great advice. I never thought that including too much could ruin my shot.

  • Good advice….. change your perspective. Modern cameras with tilting screens help a lot too. I have recently purchased a Nikon P7100 to back up my main DSLR kit. The macro mode is simply stunning and I’ve recently used it at a wedding shoot to capture the rings close up.

  • Marco

    That is a great starting point that I learned early on shooting wildlife with telephotos. However I have since learned to do the opposite as well. I start by getting the “frame filling portrait” of the animal, but the zoom out and get the “animal in its environment” shots that are often much better images. Wildlife photography is often about the where and why of the animal so environmental shots are best. If you are shooting for an encyclopedia or field guide on animals, you want the zoomed in, frame filling portrait style of image. Different needs for different purposes. So I cover both styles while I am there if it is possible.

  • Very good tips to start. By the way I think I’m getting it: http://mauriciofotodigital.blogspot.com/2010/10/blog-post_6276.html

  • Kathleen Mekailek

    I have learned to get close and now love my zoom! I took pictures of my nectarine tree blooming and the branches were nice, but I love the shots of one or two flowers and when bees showed up- it was a bonus!
    Only comment about this article which would have beeb more helpful to me a couple months ago is that you don’t explain bokeh to the people you are teaching while telling them to get closer. That is what transformed my photos and actually made me want to get as close as possible.

  • simplysutton

    This made me smile.

Some Older Comments

  • Morris March 20, 2012 12:47 am

    Very good tips to start. By the way I think I'm getting it: http://mauriciofotodigital.blogspot.com/2010/10/blog-post_6276.html

  • Marco February 17, 2012 05:19 am

    That is a great starting point that I learned early on shooting wildlife with telephotos. However I have since learned to do the opposite as well. I start by getting the "frame filling portrait" of the animal, but the zoom out and get the "animal in its environment" shots that are often much better images. Wildlife photography is often about the where and why of the animal so environmental shots are best. If you are shooting for an encyclopedia or field guide on animals, you want the zoomed in, frame filling portrait style of image. Different needs for different purposes. So I cover both styles while I am there if it is possible.

  • Paul February 15, 2012 07:26 am

    Good advice..... change your perspective. Modern cameras with tilting screens help a lot too. I have recently purchased a Nikon P7100 to back up my main DSLR kit. The macro mode is simply stunning and I've recently used it at a wedding shoot to capture the rings close up.

  • tjade February 12, 2012 05:38 am

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/tracyjade/6857732813/

  • Joel February 11, 2012 01:28 pm

    Great advice. I never thought that including too much could ruin my shot.

  • john j February 11, 2012 12:33 pm

    This is a picture where I got in close to a pine cone lying in the backyard. Getting in close brought out a lot of the detail and texture.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/gtyellojacket/6094763276/

  • Friend February 11, 2012 04:49 am

    My attempt in the past in trying to get close -
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/65728881@N08/6274229680/in/photostream/

  • Israel Brewster February 11, 2012 03:03 am

    Speaking of bees, here's another one I got, of a bee this time:

    http://brewstersoft.com/photo-of-the-day/two-bee/img-1915.html

    The bee isn't as sharp as I would like, but I do like how the background blurred into nonexistence.

  • Naveen February 11, 2012 02:53 am

    www.viewingthroughlens.blogspot.com/2011/09/flower-and-bee.html

    i got closser to the subject and i got this

  • gail February 11, 2012 12:48 am

    @JustJoyce - the background on the shot at f5.6 is more blurry.

    Shooting close is one of my favorite things! Thanks for a wonderful article.

  • Dave February 10, 2012 02:11 pm

    Don't zoom, get physically close to the subject! Give it some depth. When you zoom in from some distance the subject will be flat and uninteresting.

  • Vicki February 10, 2012 01:47 pm

    Your're spot on with this one. I can't believe how much more interesting some of my images become when I zoomed in close, change the angle and aperture.

    I've only had a DSLR camera for around a year, but now that I've taken umpteen thousand shots since then, I am gradually learning to 'see' through the viewfinder and experiment with the camera settings.

    It's been a gradual learning curve, but I can attribute a lot of the improvement to browsing Professional Photographer's websites and blogs. I make a decision or whether I like or dislike the compostion and then seriously try to work out why I like it.

    In some cases, I've succeeded to apply the same approach in my own photos, but when it comes to other areas I'm not so successful.

    It's all a matter of practise, practise and more practise, and opening your eyes to see 'outside the box'.

  • Jim Carley February 10, 2012 12:29 pm

    As a newbie to DSLR within the last few months, I know I didn't consider getting closer until a few weeks ago on a nice foggy morning.

    Here is my result. http://www.flickr.com/photos/jcarley/6843969561/in/set-72157629251758937/

    Will definitely be reminding myself to get closer from now on!

  • Cindy Dalfovo February 10, 2012 10:30 am

    I'm a beginner, and this was really helpful! The photos really helped me understand it... thanks! I will try to remember that next time I go out to shoot!

  • JustJoyce February 10, 2012 04:17 am

    Help - I don't see the difference between frame at f/9 and frame at f/5.6. Helpful article though.

  • ksw February 10, 2012 04:17 am

    Thank you. Great great example and shot series. I really thought I was going to be disappointed - Or that you would change lenses... Really good.

  • Ed Walker February 10, 2012 03:51 am

    I've just written a blog post about getting closer in street photography...

    http://www.edwalkerphotography.com/2012/02/01/getting-closer/

  • John P. February 10, 2012 03:33 am

    Great advise. I find that the reverse can hold true when you're photographing landscapes. Instead of zooming in on your subject, take a minute to zoom out as well.

  • Dave February 10, 2012 03:29 am

    If I'm not shooting birds and alligators with my 400mm prime I like to shoot up close with my 10-22mm zoom set to 10mm. I wait until the action fills the FOV (or more) and tumble out of the way to avoid being run over.

  • Israel Brewster February 10, 2012 03:26 am

    This advice can work, even with birds:

    http://brewstersoft.com/photo-of-the-day/please-please-come-closer/

    I've always liked macro shots, unfortunately they tend not to mesh well with my liking of landscape and wildlife shots. These birds on my porch, however, let me get fairly close - and I could easily crop any of those shots to get a full-frame image, since they are 18 mega pixel.

  • David February 10, 2012 02:56 am

    Good article, my Panasonic has a magic button, called iA, don't know if it'd work magic for moss but its so good I usually ignore aperture mode and program on my G2 and just let the magic happen!

    Not tried extension tubes with a wide angle zoom, going to give that a go with my Nikon D90 and the Tokina 11~16 zoom.....thanks for the thought!

  • Fuzzypiggy February 9, 2012 11:46 pm

    As someone once said, "Artists are concerned with what they want to include. Photographers are concerned with what they can exclude.".

    I think this attitude we all have when we first start is down to the fact that we think that becuase the best images we see include so much vivid detail and interest we think that just grabbing everything in the frame will automatically make it interesting. We don't realise that the masters of the art have checked, checked and double checked that the composition is perfect before they even put the camera on the tripod. The master snapper has a pretty damn good idea about what will make a scene work, what needs to stay in and what needs to be kept out, well in advance of thinking about the kit needed.

    Took me about 4 years to learn to look with my eyes first, not the viewfinder. Then to "sweep the frame" when I am ready to shoot and looking at composing. Not saying I am any good but it took me thousands of shots and years before I learned to think before I act!

  • Jeff E Jensen February 9, 2012 04:28 pm

    Here's some up close and personal shots of the 119:

    http://jeffejensen.blogspot.com/2012/01/119-up-close-and-personal.html

  • Al February 9, 2012 02:32 pm

    I had a similar Moss on tree encounter last summer only it was with a mushroom:

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/albertshu/6414340913/in/photostream

  • OnyxE February 9, 2012 12:59 pm

    I came to naturally get close to geese because I loved their faces but probably don't think to do it for other subjects. http://www.flickr.com/photos/marionlynne777/6839908041/in/photostream/lightbox/

    I took one close head shot of a goose once and after looking at the photo saw I was clearly reflected in the goose's eye...had I been closer in that one and just got the eye and reflection it would have been a really neat photo.

  • Scottc February 9, 2012 10:58 am

    A great way of explaining DoF and teaching how to work with it.

    I think each of these photos represents one or more steps "closer" than most would take under the circumstances.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/lendog64/sets/72157629237254709/

  • ccting February 9, 2012 10:37 am

    What if your subject is a crocodile or a tiger l:

  • Zaman Khan February 9, 2012 09:19 am

    I keep a kenko macro extension tube on my wide angle 10-20 lens, Does wonders for nature photography. Get in close with a wide angle lens, opens up a new world.

    One thing that i kinda would say is get closer but don't zoom in, wide angle lenses are made for getting in closer more than zoom lenses i would say.

  • jim February 9, 2012 06:55 am

    I dont think that getting closer is what you should be teaching. How about framing and composition? Shooting the moss you did both of that. You identified the subject and then taught them that when they apply basic com-positional and framing laws the image becomes a much better story.

    The last frame you even applied rule of thirds and taught them about dof. Photography 101. Nice job.

  • oppimaniac February 9, 2012 06:40 am

    You are absolutely right. The question always is: What is needed to tell the story?
    And it could be done with a simply cam as well.
    https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-4fF6IKUi9zU/TzLPNY5zvaI/AAAAAAAABgI/-oJu3FDRkrQ/s1024/DSCF4457.jpg

  • Alexander DiMauro February 9, 2012 04:39 am

    What I like best about this article is that you show the whole progression, not just before and after. That really helps a great deal. Thanks!

  • Erik Kerstenbeck February 9, 2012 04:21 am

    Hi

    Great article - I like to get close when using a wide angle. I love the perspective it lends. Here is a shot of a Harley Davidson taken in San Diego against a colorful mural

    http://kerstenbeckphotoart.wordpress.com/2012/02/07/night-rider-chicano-park-san-diego/

  • Barry E.Warren February 9, 2012 04:01 am

    Getting closer is good, screw on some macro lens and even get closer.

  • dgd February 9, 2012 03:16 am

    Great advice. I tell this to my friends all the time. For beginners that just bought a camera and feel overwhelmed on where to start, I tell them: get close, follow rule of thirds, shoot wide to get some depth. Once they get comfortable. Their photos will start to look really similar, at which point they will develop new techniques and continue to improve.

  • Jessica Peters February 9, 2012 02:32 am

    I love this article! Great advice! I know I am guilty of this most of the time. I always try and remind myself. Even if its only to get a different perspective.

  • raghavendra February 9, 2012 02:23 am

    This totally depends upon the subject.
    we cannot take a closer shot for every picture.

    http://raghavendra-mobilephotography.blogspot.com/2011/06/close-shot-of-insect.html

  • Mridula February 9, 2012 02:14 am

    I somehow love getting closer and filling the frame but the birds are not so receptive to the idea sometimes.

    http://blogs.gonomad.com/traveltalesfromindia/2012/02/a-blue-throat.html

  • Ed Letts February 9, 2012 02:10 am

    I too suffered from this and as I learned the value of getting closer a great exercise was to go back through my first photos and crop them tighter. I found that many so so photos became good and even great photos when I cropped them closer. It was also a great opportunity to apply the newly learned rule of thirds.

  • Andreea February 9, 2012 02:09 am

    The moss in the picture has the form of an elephant, especially in the third photo.
    Nice article btw.

  • hubblefromthesun February 9, 2012 02:06 am

    Thanks for the great example! I like how you talked about alternating between moving in closer and changing the angle to get a different perspective.

  • Traciatim February 9, 2012 01:55 am

    This is about the exact opposite of advice that I try to give people using point and shoots to take a shot of people. I always find people just stand where ever they currently are and then zoom out until they can fit the person in the picture and take a shot. So you end up with 28-35mm with people with big noses and small foreheads. So generally I try not to get in to the details of distortion, but give the advice of "step back, zoom in".

  • Jean-Pierre February 9, 2012 01:47 am

    My attempts at being 'closer' for a more interesting photo. One with people, one with shrubbery.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/45517597@N07/6250354090/in/photostream

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/45517597@N07/6245352500/in/photostream

  • Arch February 9, 2012 01:35 am

    Great tip. I love how the progression goes from something blah to a keeper. Will keep this in mind when shooting.

  • MikeC366 February 9, 2012 01:33 am

    Nice article Peter. Thank you.
    I've found getting close to be quite a psychological barrier in street photography, but in nature I like it a lot.
    Here is one of my recent shots that shows that getting in closer is a joy in what it can sometimes surprise you with.

    http://wp.me/p268wp-6w

    Thanks again for the great article.
    Mike.

  • Ed O'Keeffe February 9, 2012 01:24 am

    This is a great tip. I am very guilty of always capturing the wide view and not getting closer. The devil is in the details so they say!

  • Andy Mills February 9, 2012 01:21 am

    Robert Capa is often quoted as saying: “If your pictures aren’t good enough, you’re not close enough”.

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