8 Tips on Taking Party Photographs - Digital Photography School
Close
Close

8 Tips on Taking Party Photographs

A Guest post by Melissa Ashenhurst from Ashenhurst Photography.

Parties are a great time for family and friends to come together and have some fun.  Here are 8 simple tips to help with taking the party shots that last.

Image by Dustin Diaz

1. Break the camera out early

Depending on the type of party you may need to start taking pictures early. Arrive early to take pictures of the decorations, food, the cake, etc before any people show up.

2. Get the group

Typically people don’t stay in a large group at parties; they are all spread out in smaller groups. While having everyone in the same room at the same time, get that group shot so you can treasure it afterwards.

3. Capture the emotion

Keep your camera handy and turned on so you’ll be ready for those spontaneous expressions.

4. Be Candid

You can get some great shots of your family and friends when they don’t even know they are getting their picture taken. This is great for capturing emotion at the party

5. Don’t be afraid to zoom in or out

Don’t be afraid of zooming in so your subject fits into your camera frame. This way you can capture the expression of the subject. Also make sure you get pictures of the party as a whole, don’t be afraid to zoom out to capture the entire room.

6. Avoid Red Eye

One of the most common occurrences when taking pictures of people at parties is red eye.  To make sure your friends and family don’t look evil eyed have them look just over your shoulder rather than directly at camera. This should help reduce the chances of red eye in your pictures therefore saving you time having to take it out before printing them.

7. Know the schedule of events

Make sure you get a copy of the time of the events so you can have your camera ready and specific shots are not missed.

8. Try different perspectives

Don’t be afraid to try different perspectives throughout the party: get at eye level with the kids to get their perspective of the party or take pictures standing on a chair or staircase to get a shot of everyone at the party.

If you enjoyed this article, you might also like...

Guest Contributor This post was written by a guest contributor to DPS. Please see their details in the post above.

Become a Contributor: Check out Write for DPS page for details about how YOU can share your photography tips with the DPS community.

  • http://kirpi.it kirpi

    Great tips! To which I’d add, just to round up:
    9. Shoot a lot! Do not be afraid of shooting. At times, it is useful to shoot and immediately re-shoot: people change their expressions, faces move, and you get more chances to obtain the right image by shooting more.
    10. Have your camera ready. I know countless people who go to parties with half-empty batteries, half-full memory cards,… It does happen, so think about it in advance.

  • Scott

    Candid shots: what about those who don’t want their picture taken, and resent the candids?

  • Scott

    Candid shots: what about those who don’t want their picture taken, and resent the candids?

  • Scott

    Candid shots: what about those who don’t want their picture taken, and resent the candids?

  • rsulong

    flashgun with a diffuser is a must and use a zoom lens instead of prime, if you can hand hold the flashgun off-camera would be better. wider angle zoom lens would be better because parties can get a little crowded. use different angles – high, low, dutch tilt. also try rear flash sync and slower shutter speed ( 1/4″ to 1/1″) for cool effects. lastly, candid and don’t look creepy when taking the shots.

  • http://www.gtvone.com Sime

    Scott, I’d argue that there’s nothing you can do about it as you’re shooting a candid, they’re not really going to know about it until they see it afterwards (on Facebook hah) and you’re not going to know they didn’t like their photo taken, as it’s a candid and you’ve not exactly “got in their face” to ask them… I’d hazard to say “deal with it after the fact” and worry about getting the shots while you’re there.

    I shot an event on Saturday night – a night club (for a radio station) and every person or group of people I waved my camera at immediately jumped into some sort of pose – it was hilariously good fun.

    Good tips, thanks!

    Sime

  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/guillermomontero Guillermo Montero

    Obviously

  • http://www.wix.com/snaphappy/SNP1 Michelle

    Scott,
    Go with: “It is easier to ask for forgiveness than permission” if you get caught in the act. If so, show them the picture to okay it. If they insist you delete it refer them to the host/hostess. Most will not want to upset them.

  • http://www.ashenhurstphotography.com Melissa

    Hey guys, I’m really glad you’re liking this post!

    @kirpi
    Thanks for sharing those great tips! Capturing all those great expressions, is just as important as photographing everything else. Thanks again.

    @Sime & @Scott
    Thank you for answering Scott’s question. I completely agree the candid photograph isn’t candid unless the subject doesn’t know they’re being photographed. If you take a true candid photograph of someone, they won’t be thinking “oh my God someone is pointing a camera at me!” and the shot turns out so much better. I don’t know how many people have told Evan or I that they don’t want their photo taken only to later see a photo we took of them when they didn’t know it and love the image.

  • http://jasoncollinphotography.com Jason Collin Photography

    Photographing this party at a local yacht & tennis club was a wild experience. Like the author suggests, I got there early and photographed the building (very well lit up) and the tables before they become all messed up (but not before the staff was fluttering about).

    http://jasoncollinphotography.com/blog/2010/1/9/treasure-island-yacht-and-tennis-club-new-years-eve-party-20.html

    The sample shot in this DPS post is really well exposed and sharp.

    Another tip could be to use manual exposure mode for party shots.

  • Steve Rubelmann

    Just did a small family reunion in a restaurant. An on-camera (rather than built-in) flash is a must. Couldn’t use bounce because of some bizarre colored walls, but kept the camera in aperature priority, which forced a 1/200 shutter speed. That got me decent depth-of-field and enough shutter speed to stop any action during talking, moving & eating. As always, shot in RAW and waited for post-processing to make it all pretty. Just my opinion, but I think they turned out pretty good. This is such a great site with lots of very usable tips. I have had to relearn photography from my mostly-manual film SLRs to my digital SLR and this site has helped immensely.

  • http://ihsankhairir.blogspot.com IHSAN

    Thanks for the tips! Anything about lighting, flash etc that I should also take note?

  • summerbl4ck

    Good tips if you’re working a party event, but if it’s just a night with friends, don’t forget to have fun too. And if you are with friends, don’t be “that guy” about taking candids if your friends aren’t into it. It is a party after all and you’d probably like to be invited back again! :-)

  • Scott

    Great tips and a great photo included in the post. Though not parties in the same sense of the word, we go to a lot of local festivals here in Europe and many of the concepts are similar, especially the candids :)

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/lendog64/4982442459/

  • http://www.flickr.com/jonmcgovern Jon McGovern

    Candid shots: what about those who don’t want their picture taken, and resent the candids?

    Say it one more time :)

  • http://markogts.blogspot.com markogts

    About lighting: use a bounce-flash. If the ceiling is white, as often is, turn the head of the external flash upwards. Pull out the built-in diffuser a bit, or put a small piece of paper on top of the flash, or use a small diffuser box, so that a small fraction of the light gets directly to subject’s eyes, to lit them up. If the ceiling is dark or with a strong tint, then use a big flash diffuser. Use flash exposure lock, so you avoid preflash (some people are very fast with eyelids).

  • http://www.japangadgetshop.com Andrea

    Sometimes whipping out an old-school instant camera is fun for parties. Since people can see the photos right away the photography becomes more a part of the party, instead of just an outside look in.

  • http://www.advancedphotography.net/ Poonam

    I liked that candid tip…..through this you can capture natural pose ……Thanks for sharing nice tips ….i will always keep in my mind :)

  • alfanick

    Another good thing from Chase Jarvis – put camera on a tripod and use intervalometer to take a picture every 5-15 second, let people do crazy stuff, than make timelapse from that :) I really liked the results.

  • Nobody

    Scott: I DESPISE being photographed. I don’t so much mind candid shots, though, because there’s literally no pressure. I may be a little embarassed later, in the sense of “aw, geez, you took my picture!” but that’s as far as it goes.

  • wal

    It’s quite strange and not cool when people say no to taking pictures at party’s.. Then wth they are doing there anyway…? still it would be just easier to just look the other way round if they dont want their pic taken

  • http://flickrtab.com/site/889015500 maky meru

    thanks for the tips..

  • Scott

    Wal: What are they doing there? Maybe they’re there for the party. To talk or whatever, not to be preserved forever on some stranger’s Flickr page. And you’re missing the point of the candid: the person wouldn’t notice the picture being taken and thus couldn’t turn away.

    I don’t know why my first post was triplicated; it was submitted once.

  • Scott

    Wal: What are they doing there? Maybe they’re there for the party. To talk or whatever, not to be preserved forever on some stranger’s Flickr page. And you’re missing the point of the candid: the person wouldn’t notice the picture being taken and thus couldn’t turn away.

    I don’t know why my first post was triplicated; it was submitted once.

  • Scott

    Wal: What are they doing there? Maybe they’re there for the party. To talk or whatever, not to be preserved forever on some stranger’s Flickr page. And you’re missing the point of the candid: the person wouldn’t notice the picture being taken and thus couldn’t turn away.

    I don’t know why my first post was triplicated; it was submitted once.

  • Scott

    Wal: What are they doing there? Maybe they’re there for the party. To talk or whatever, not to be preserved forever on some stranger’s Flickr page. And you’re missing the point of the candid: the person wouldn’t notice the picture being taken and thus couldn’t turn away.

    I don’t know why my first post was triplicated; it was submitted once.

  • Scott

    Wal: What are they doing there? Maybe they’re there for the party. To talk or whatever, not to be preserved forever on some stranger’s Flickr page. And you’re missing the point of the candid: the person wouldn’t notice the picture being taken and thus couldn’t turn away.

    I don’t know why my first post was triplicated; it was submitted once.

  • Scott

    And again, triplicate, and I absolutely, 100% submitted it once. Any Safari incompatibilities? No way to remove multiple posts?

  • http://www.facetofacephotosbyjodi.com Jodi

    All good tips…would’ve liked to see a few more sample photos along w/the tips though. Thanks for sharing!

  • klemen

    I also like to take party shots. Mostly I shoot nature, because it’s still, nobody is turning away from the camera, every moment it shows all its beauty. BUT, if you shoot paties (especially of your friends) those are the pictures that will always bring you smile on your face, even if they are not of any artistic value. In 100 years you won’t be fedup with them. Picturing people having a great time is timeless. You can immerse in those photos, living again that moment and forget all the worries of outside world. :)

  • http://www.greatphotoshop.com/newSite/defaultH.asp Haim Srur

    Great list of tip I would add to it shoot in slow shutter speed and add flash in second curtain.

  • James

    If it’s a casual party (not, say, a company party or a party where you were hired to take photos), don’t bring the largest lens in the bag and your battery grip. I find the cheaper the camera, the more comfortable people seem in front of it. My girlfriend gets the best ‘natural’ shots using her crummy toy Instax instant camera. I usually bring along my ‘Nifty Fifty’ (50mm f/1.8) since it’s so small, and it’s a good focal length so people don’t look distorted when you take close-up shots. I’m also on the fence about bringing out the speedlight. Of course, it allows you to take MUCH better photos, but again, the big speedlight on the SLR may put some people off. Many times I just open up the aperture, bump up the ISO (for background exposure) and shoot with the pop-up. The speedlight is in the bag, though. Just in case you are ‘the camera guy’ and they want a big group shot.

  • http://www.2rings.nl/ Esther

    Another tip:

    – slow shutterspeed (1/10 or something like that)
    – flash on rear curtain
    – zoom in or out while taking the shot.
    Or
    – turn camera while taking the shot.

    Works best with lights in the background.
    Example here:
    [eimg url='http://www.2-rings.nl/wp-content/uploads/2010/08/WencheBart_blog_10042.jpg' title='WencheBart_blog_10042.jpg']

  • Edwin A. Hernández-Caraballo

    Program your camera in the continuous shooting mode, and take various shots of the same situation. It is a pitty to think that one has taken a nice portrait and later find that someone has his/her eyes closed, or moved a little and the image is blurred, etc.

  • http://lifeisafieldwork.wordpress.com Robin Oberg

    If you have some extra cameras, put them out with the people at the party. Different people take different kind of photos, and it’s always extra fun to be like “huh, where was this, and how did it happen?” :)

    Otherwise, you could just pass that cheaper camera around, and let people photograph whatever they want. It’s always fun to know you were also at the party ;)

    Or you could just make like an area for photos, with stuff to wear (like freaky glasses or hats), so you know the lighting and depth of field is just perfect. It’s a great thing to do at the entrance when people arrive, and they usually are the best dressed at that time aswell. Otherwise it’s also kind of fun seeing how everyone gets more and more rowdy as the set progresses. Not the mention how the camera-man’s steady hand gets more and more unsteady as the party progresses :D

  • renato molina

    i agree totally with kirpi … shoot a lot! we just don’t know when the moment of “grace” comes when people are in their best photographic selves.

  • http://www.partyandeventguide.com Jerry Blackwell

    Great Post! We need more good party and event photographers so we can blog your party pictures!

  • Tom Wilson

    These photo sharing sites are great but sometimes I want to get a photo from someone immediately, say, when we are out having fun and someone takes that great picture of me and my friends. I found this great app called Share2Qr (or is it Share 2 QR) for my android phone. It’s easy and all someone needs to get a picture from me is a barcode scanner. It’s on the android market!

  • David Green

    don’t be afraid of using wide , or ultra-wide lenses close up for whacky images !!

Some older comments

  • Tom Wilson

    February 14, 2012 08:52 am

    These photo sharing sites are great but sometimes I want to get a photo from someone immediately, say, when we are out having fun and someone takes that great picture of me and my friends. I found this great app called Share2Qr (or is it Share 2 QR) for my android phone. It's easy and all someone needs to get a picture from me is a barcode scanner. It's on the android market!

  • Jerry Blackwell

    November 1, 2011 07:09 am

    Great Post! We need more good party and event photographers so we can blog your party pictures!

  • renato molina

    November 26, 2010 02:04 pm

    i agree totally with kirpi ... shoot a lot! we just don't know when the moment of "grace" comes when people are in their best photographic selves.

  • Robin Oberg

    October 11, 2010 06:59 pm

    If you have some extra cameras, put them out with the people at the party. Different people take different kind of photos, and it's always extra fun to be like "huh, where was this, and how did it happen?" :)

    Otherwise, you could just pass that cheaper camera around, and let people photograph whatever they want. It's always fun to know you were also at the party ;)

    Or you could just make like an area for photos, with stuff to wear (like freaky glasses or hats), so you know the lighting and depth of field is just perfect. It's a great thing to do at the entrance when people arrive, and they usually are the best dressed at that time aswell. Otherwise it's also kind of fun seeing how everyone gets more and more rowdy as the set progresses. Not the mention how the camera-man's steady hand gets more and more unsteady as the party progresses :D

  • Edwin A. Hernández-Caraballo

    September 18, 2010 08:53 am

    Program your camera in the continuous shooting mode, and take various shots of the same situation. It is a pitty to think that one has taken a nice portrait and later find that someone has his/her eyes closed, or moved a little and the image is blurred, etc.

  • Esther

    September 18, 2010 05:35 am

    Another tip:

    - slow shutterspeed (1/10 or something like that)
    - flash on rear curtain
    - zoom in or out while taking the shot.
    Or
    - turn camera while taking the shot.

    Works best with lights in the background.
    Example here:
    [eimg url='http://www.2-rings.nl/wp-content/uploads/2010/08/WencheBart_blog_10042.jpg' title='WencheBart_blog_10042.jpg']

  • James

    September 18, 2010 04:15 am

    If it's a casual party (not, say, a company party or a party where you were hired to take photos), don't bring the largest lens in the bag and your battery grip. I find the cheaper the camera, the more comfortable people seem in front of it. My girlfriend gets the best 'natural' shots using her crummy toy Instax instant camera. I usually bring along my 'Nifty Fifty' (50mm f/1.8) since it's so small, and it's a good focal length so people don't look distorted when you take close-up shots. I'm also on the fence about bringing out the speedlight. Of course, it allows you to take MUCH better photos, but again, the big speedlight on the SLR may put some people off. Many times I just open up the aperture, bump up the ISO (for background exposure) and shoot with the pop-up. The speedlight is in the bag, though. Just in case you are 'the camera guy' and they want a big group shot.

  • Haim Srur

    September 18, 2010 02:17 am

    Great list of tip I would add to it shoot in slow shutter speed and add flash in second curtain.

  • klemen

    September 18, 2010 12:00 am

    I also like to take party shots. Mostly I shoot nature, because it's still, nobody is turning away from the camera, every moment it shows all its beauty. BUT, if you shoot paties (especially of your friends) those are the pictures that will always bring you smile on your face, even if they are not of any artistic value. In 100 years you won't be fedup with them. Picturing people having a great time is timeless. You can immerse in those photos, living again that moment and forget all the worries of outside world. :)

  • Jodi

    September 17, 2010 11:51 pm

    All good tips...would've liked to see a few more sample photos along w/the tips though. Thanks for sharing!

  • Scott

    September 16, 2010 12:34 am

    And again, triplicate, and I absolutely, 100% submitted it once. Any Safari incompatibilities? No way to remove multiple posts?

  • Scott

    September 16, 2010 12:22 am

    Wal: What are they doing there? Maybe they're there for the party. To talk or whatever, not to be preserved forever on some stranger's Flickr page. And you're missing the point of the candid: the person wouldn't notice the picture being taken and thus couldn't turn away.

    I don't know why my first post was triplicated; it was submitted once.

  • Scott

    September 16, 2010 12:21 am

    Wal: What are they doing there? Maybe they're there for the party. To talk or whatever, not to be preserved forever on some stranger's Flickr page. And you're missing the point of the candid: the person wouldn't notice the picture being taken and thus couldn't turn away.

    I don't know why my first post was triplicated; it was submitted once.

  • Scott

    September 16, 2010 12:21 am

    Wal: What are they doing there? Maybe they're there for the party. To talk or whatever, not to be preserved forever on some stranger's Flickr page. And you're missing the point of the candid: the person wouldn't notice the picture being taken and thus couldn't turn away.

    I don't know why my first post was triplicated; it was submitted once.

  • Scott

    September 16, 2010 12:20 am

    Wal: What are they doing there? Maybe they're there for the party. To talk or whatever, not to be preserved forever on some stranger's Flickr page. And you're missing the point of the candid: the person wouldn't notice the picture being taken and thus couldn't turn away.

    I don't know why my first post was triplicated; it was submitted once.

  • Scott

    September 16, 2010 12:19 am

    Wal: What are they doing there? Maybe they're there for the party. To talk or whatever, not to be preserved forever on some stranger's Flickr page. And you're missing the point of the candid: the person wouldn't notice the picture being taken and thus couldn't turn away.

    I don't know why my first post was triplicated; it was submitted once.

  • maky meru

    September 15, 2010 09:38 am

    thanks for the tips..

  • wal

    September 15, 2010 03:01 am

    It's quite strange and not cool when people say no to taking pictures at party's.. Then wth they are doing there anyway...? still it would be just easier to just look the other way round if they dont want their pic taken

  • Nobody

    September 15, 2010 02:08 am

    Scott: I DESPISE being photographed. I don't so much mind candid shots, though, because there's literally no pressure. I may be a little embarassed later, in the sense of "aw, geez, you took my picture!" but that's as far as it goes.

  • alfanick

    September 14, 2010 09:59 pm

    Another good thing from Chase Jarvis - put camera on a tripod and use intervalometer to take a picture every 5-15 second, let people do crazy stuff, than make timelapse from that :) I really liked the results.

  • Poonam

    September 14, 2010 08:54 pm

    I liked that candid tip.....through this you can capture natural pose ......Thanks for sharing nice tips ....i will always keep in my mind :)

  • Andrea

    September 14, 2010 06:00 pm

    Sometimes whipping out an old-school instant camera is fun for parties. Since people can see the photos right away the photography becomes more a part of the party, instead of just an outside look in.

  • markogts

    September 14, 2010 05:21 pm

    About lighting: use a bounce-flash. If the ceiling is white, as often is, turn the head of the external flash upwards. Pull out the built-in diffuser a bit, or put a small piece of paper on top of the flash, or use a small diffuser box, so that a small fraction of the light gets directly to subject's eyes, to lit them up. If the ceiling is dark or with a strong tint, then use a big flash diffuser. Use flash exposure lock, so you avoid preflash (some people are very fast with eyelids).

  • Jon McGovern

    September 14, 2010 04:39 pm

    Candid shots: what about those who don’t want their picture taken, and resent the candids?

    Say it one more time :)

  • Scott

    September 14, 2010 02:01 pm

    Great tips and a great photo included in the post. Though not parties in the same sense of the word, we go to a lot of local festivals here in Europe and many of the concepts are similar, especially the candids :)

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/lendog64/4982442459/

  • summerbl4ck

    September 14, 2010 01:19 pm

    Good tips if you're working a party event, but if it's just a night with friends, don't forget to have fun too. And if you are with friends, don't be "that guy" about taking candids if your friends aren't into it. It is a party after all and you'd probably like to be invited back again! :-)

  • IHSAN

    September 14, 2010 01:18 pm

    Thanks for the tips! Anything about lighting, flash etc that I should also take note?

  • Steve Rubelmann

    September 14, 2010 12:03 pm

    Just did a small family reunion in a restaurant. An on-camera (rather than built-in) flash is a must. Couldn't use bounce because of some bizarre colored walls, but kept the camera in aperature priority, which forced a 1/200 shutter speed. That got me decent depth-of-field and enough shutter speed to stop any action during talking, moving & eating. As always, shot in RAW and waited for post-processing to make it all pretty. Just my opinion, but I think they turned out pretty good. This is such a great site with lots of very usable tips. I have had to relearn photography from my mostly-manual film SLRs to my digital SLR and this site has helped immensely.

  • Jason Collin Photography

    September 14, 2010 11:10 am

    Photographing this party at a local yacht & tennis club was a wild experience. Like the author suggests, I got there early and photographed the building (very well lit up) and the tables before they become all messed up (but not before the staff was fluttering about).

    http://jasoncollinphotography.com/blog/2010/1/9/treasure-island-yacht-and-tennis-club-new-years-eve-party-20.html

    The sample shot in this DPS post is really well exposed and sharp.

    Another tip could be to use manual exposure mode for party shots.

  • Melissa

    September 14, 2010 10:50 am

    Hey guys, I'm really glad you're liking this post!

    @kirpi
    Thanks for sharing those great tips! Capturing all those great expressions, is just as important as photographing everything else. Thanks again.

    @Sime & @Scott
    Thank you for answering Scott's question. I completely agree the candid photograph isn't candid unless the subject doesn't know they're being photographed. If you take a true candid photograph of someone, they won't be thinking "oh my God someone is pointing a camera at me!" and the shot turns out so much better. I don't know how many people have told Evan or I that they don't want their photo taken only to later see a photo we took of them when they didn't know it and love the image.

  • Michelle

    September 14, 2010 10:41 am

    Scott,
    Go with: "It is easier to ask for forgiveness than permission" if you get caught in the act. If so, show them the picture to okay it. If they insist you delete it refer them to the host/hostess. Most will not want to upset them.

  • Guillermo Montero

    September 14, 2010 09:24 am

    Obviously

  • Sime

    September 14, 2010 09:18 am

    Scott, I'd argue that there's nothing you can do about it as you're shooting a candid, they're not really going to know about it until they see it afterwards (on Facebook hah) and you're not going to know they didn't like their photo taken, as it's a candid and you've not exactly "got in their face" to ask them... I'd hazard to say "deal with it after the fact" and worry about getting the shots while you're there.

    I shot an event on Saturday night - a night club (for a radio station) and every person or group of people I waved my camera at immediately jumped into some sort of pose - it was hilariously good fun.

    Good tips, thanks!

    Sime

  • rsulong

    September 14, 2010 09:11 am

    flashgun with a diffuser is a must and use a zoom lens instead of prime, if you can hand hold the flashgun off-camera would be better. wider angle zoom lens would be better because parties can get a little crowded. use different angles - high, low, dutch tilt. also try rear flash sync and slower shutter speed ( 1/4" to 1/1") for cool effects. lastly, candid and don't look creepy when taking the shots.

  • Scott

    September 14, 2010 08:33 am

    Candid shots: what about those who don't want their picture taken, and resent the candids?

  • Scott

    September 14, 2010 08:32 am

    Candid shots: what about those who don't want their picture taken, and resent the candids?

  • Scott

    September 14, 2010 08:32 am

    Candid shots: what about those who don't want their picture taken, and resent the candids?

  • kirpi

    September 14, 2010 08:29 am

    Great tips! To which I'd add, just to round up:
    9. Shoot a lot! Do not be afraid of shooting. At times, it is useful to shoot and immediately re-shoot: people change their expressions, faces move, and you get more chances to obtain the right image by shooting more.
    10. Have your camera ready. I know countless people who go to parties with half-empty batteries, half-full memory cards,... It does happen, so think about it in advance.

Receive a FREE SAMPLE of our Portrait Photography Ebook

  • Guaranteed for 2 full months
  • Pay by PayPal or CreditCard
  • Instant Digital Download

Receive a FREE SAMPLE of our Portrait Photography Ebook

  • Guaranteed for 2 full months
  • Pay by PayPal or CreditCard
  • Instant Digital Download

Receive a FREE SAMPLE of our Portrait Photography Ebook

  • Guaranteed for 2 full months
  • Pay by PayPal or CreditCard
  • Instant Digital Download

Sign up to the free DPS PHOTOGRAPHY COURSE

  • Guaranteed for 2 full months
  • Pay by PayPal or CreditCard
  • Instant Digital Download

GET DAILY free tips, news and reviews via our RSS Feed

Sign up to the free

DPS PHOTOGRAPHY COURSE

  • Guaranteed for 2 full months
  • Pay by PayPal or CreditCard
  • Instant Digital Download

GET DAILY free tips, news and reviews via our RSS Feed

Sign up to the free

DPS PHOTOGRAPHY COURSE

  • Guaranteed for 2 full months
  • Pay by PayPal or CreditCard
  • Instant Digital Download
DPS NEWSLETTER
DPS NEWSLETTER
DPS NEWSLETTER

DPS offers a free weekly newsletter with: 
1. new photography tutorials and tips
2. latest photography assignments
3. photo competitions and prizes

Enter your email below to subscribe.
Email:
 
 
Get DAILY free tips, news and reviews via our RSS feed